Qt apps on Ubuntu

Tuesday, January 18th, 2011

As part of our planning for Natty+1, we’ll need to find some space on the CD for Qt libraries, and we will evaluate applications developed with Qt for inclusion on the CD and default install of Ubuntu.

Ease of use, and effective integration, are key values in our user experience. We care that the applications we choose are harmonious with one another and the system as a whole. Historically, that has meant that we’ve given very strong preference to applications written using Gtk, because a certain amount of harmony comes by default from the use of the same developer toolkit. That said, with OpenOffice and Firefox having been there from the start, Gtk is clearly not an absolute requirement. What I’m arguing now is that it’s the values which are important, and the toolkit is only a means to that end. We should evaluate apps on the basis of how well they meet the requirement, not prejudice them on the basis of technical choices made by the developer.

In evaluating an app for the Ubuntu default install, we should ask:

* is it free software?
* is it best-in-class?
* does it integrate with the system settings and preferences?
* does it integrate with other applications?
* is it accessible to people who cannot use a mouse, or keyboard?
* does it look and feel consistent with the rest of the system?

Of course, the developer’s choice of Qt has no influence on the first two. Qt itself has been available under the GPL for a long time, and more recently became available under the LGPL. And there’s plenty of best-in-class software written with Qt, it’s a very capable toolkit.

System settings and prefs, however, have long been a cause of friction between Qt and Gtk. Integration with system settings and preferences is critical to the sense of an application “belonging” on the system. It affects the ability to manage that application using the same tools one uses to manage all the other applications, and the sorts of settings-and-preference experience that users can have with the app. This has traditionally been a problem with Qt / KDE applications on Ubuntu, because Gtk apps all use a centrally-manageable preferences store, and KDE apps do things differently.

To address this, Canonical is driving the development of dconf bindings for Qt, so that it is possible to write a Qt app that uses the same settings framework as everything else in Ubuntu. We’ve contracted with Ryan Lortie, who obviously knows dconf very well, and he’ll work with some folks at Canonical who have been using Qt for custom development work for customers. We’re confident the result will be natural for Qt developers, and a complete expression of dconf’s semantics and style.

The Qt team have long worked well in the broader Ubuntu community – we have great Qt representation at UDS every six months, the Kubuntu team have deep experience and interest in Qt packaging and maintenance, there is lots of good technical exchange between Qt upstream and various parts of the Ubuntu community, including Canonical. For example, Qt folks are working to integrate uTouch.

I’d draw a distinction between “Qt” and “KDE” in the obvious places. A KDE app doesn’t know anything about the dconf system configuration, and can’t easily integrate with the Ubuntu desktop as a result. So we’re not going to be proposing Amarok to replace Banshee any time soon! But I think it’s entirely plausible that dconf, once it has great Qt bindings, be considered by the KDE community. There are better people to lead that conversation if they want, so I’ll not push the idea further here :-). Nevertheless, should a KDE app learn to talk dconf in addition to the standard KDE mechanisms, which should be straightforward, it would be a candidate for the Ubuntu default install.

The decision to be open to Qt is in no way a criticism of GNOME. It’s a celebration of free software’s diversity and complexity. Those values of ease of use and integration remain shared values with GNOME, and a great basis for collaboration with GNOME developers and project members. Perhaps GNOME itself will embrace Qt, perhaps not, but if it does then our willingness to blaze this trail would be a contribution in leadership. It’s much easier to make a vibrant ecosystem if you accept a certain amount of divergence from the canonical way, so to speak ;-) Our work on design is centered around GNOME, with settings and preferences the current focus as we move to GNOME 3.0 and gtk3.

Of course, this is a perfect opportunity for those who would poke fun at that relationship to do so, but in my view what matters most is the solid relationship we have with people who actually write applications under the GNOME banner. We want to be the very best way to make the hard work of those free software developers *matter*, by which we mean, the best way to ensure it makes a real difference in millions of lives every day, and the best way to connect them to their users.

To the good folks at Trolltech, now Nokia, who have made Qt a great toolkit – thank you. To developers who wish to use it and be part of the Ubuntu experience – welcome.

183 comments:

  1. Osm says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 9:31 am

    super and fantastic! Good decision, thank you.

  2. Paskma says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 9:36 am

    I appreciate that. I was very surprised how well Clementine (Amarok 1.x port to Qt4) integrates with Ubuntu desktop. (And frankly, I’m preferring this app over Banshee/Rhythmbox).

  3. Qt apps on UbuntuMark Shuttleworth | 9nd.pl says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 9:37 am

    [...] mark Posted by Bez kategorii Subscribe to RSS feed [...]

  4. me4oslav says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 9:37 am

    The Unity 2D version uses QT and QMl,and If I have understood right it will be shipped for 11.04,so doesn’t that mean that 11.04 will also be shipped with QT stuff.Anyway speaking of QT i’m pretty sure a lot of people (including me) would like to know if there are any chances Unity switching to QT entirely(both 2D and 3D version).

  5. novatillasku.com » Blog Archive » Aplicaciones Qt en Ubuntu(Mark Shuttleworth) says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 9:37 am

    [...] Mark Shuttleworth, acaba de escribir en su blog sobre la inclusión de las aplicaciones Qt en el cd de instalación de cara a la próxima versión, Ubuntu 11.04. Como os comentaba el otro dia, Unity tendrá opción para 2D y usará Qt, es por eso que se necesitan incluir las distintas bibliotecas que necesitan las aplicaciones en la instalación, para los usuarios que vayan a necesitar 2D. Como Mark comenta en su post:“Qt ha estado disponible bajo la licencia GPL por mucho tiempo, y más recientemente se hizo disponible bajo la licencia LGPL.”, que es una de las primeros requisitos para incluir una aplicación por defecto en Ubuntu. A pesar de las fricciones que ha habido entre Qt y Gtk, Canonical está impulsando el desarrollo de enlaces dconf para Qt, por lo que es posible escribir una aplicación de Qt que utiliza el marco de la misma configuración que todo lo demás en Ubuntu. De todo ésto y de cómo habrá intercambio técnico con la comunidad de Kubuntu, nos habla Mark en su blog, donde podéis ir a leerlo completo. [...]

  6. novatillasku.com » Blog Archive » Aplicaciones Qt en Ubuntu(Mark Shuttleworth) says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 9:37 am

    [...] Mark Shuttleworth, acaba de escribir en su blog sobre la inclusión de las aplicaciones Qt en el cd de instalación de cara a la próxima versión, Ubuntu 11.04. Como os comentaba el otro dia, Unity tendrá opción para 2D y usará Qt, es por eso que se necesitan incluir las distintas bibliotecas que necesitan las aplicaciones en la instalación, para los usuarios que vayan a necesitar 2D. Como Mark comenta en su post:“Qt ha estado disponible bajo la licencia GPL por mucho tiempo, y más recientemente se hizo disponible bajo la licencia LGPL.”, que es una de las primeros requisitos para incluir una aplicación por defecto en Ubuntu. A pesar de las fricciones que ha habido entre Qt y Gtk, Canonical está impulsando el desarrollo de enlaces dconf para Qt, por lo que es posible escribir una aplicación de Qt que utiliza el marco de la misma configuración que todo lo demás en Ubuntu. De todo ésto y de cómo habrá intercambio técnico con la comunidad de Kubuntu, nos habla Mark en su blog, donde podéis ir a leerlo completo. [...]

  7. Sebastian Sauer says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 9:39 am

    > because Gtk apps all use a centrally-manageable preferences store, and
    > KDE apps do things differently.

    That’s not correct. KDE has KConfig which is a centrally-manageable preference
    store.

    > A KDE app doesn’t know anything about the dconf system configuration,
    > and can’t easily integrate with the Ubuntu desktop as a result.

    That’s not correct either. KConfig has plugable backends what would allow to get dconf integrated. The best is that can be done transparently without the need to touch the applications themself and without breaking what works already. It could be so easy…

  8. pmarin says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 9:39 am

    How about the different Human Interface guidelines between GNOME and KDE like keybinding or window layouts?

  9. Bilal Akhtar says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 9:40 am

    Good to see this post come by. Canonical has been developing Qt apps for a while now (eg Bazaar Explorer) and I have faith that this plan will go well.

  10. Juanjo Marin says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 9:41 am

    Hi Mark. I’ve read natty will come with a Qt-based Unity 2D as a fallback mode to provide a Unity environment on hardware platforms that don’t support Unity’s Open GL requirements.

    I guess this is the main reason, or at least one of them, for the inclusion of Qt, isn’t it ?. I’d like to know the rationale for using Qt instead of GTK+ for developing new components for Ubuntu. Is there any document about this ?. Thanks.

  11. Cyrille Berger says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 9:45 am

    On a side note, writting a dconf-backend for the KDE’s configuration system is possible. And no change needed for applications.

  12. Pavel says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 9:46 am

    great to see this push finally happening. The different handling of Qt and Gtk applications was an obstacle for a long enough time now. In the end this will mean that whether it is Gtk or Qt doesnt matter any more, which is great.
    Qt was my personal preference for some time now as it simply innovates faster than Gtk and seeing it in MeeGo was great.
    Now seeing it in Ubuntu is even better, as it finally makes Qt really cross-plattform. Look native on MeeGo, looks native on Ubuntu, looks native on Windows.
    I just hope that the Ubuntu/ MeeGo based tablets come out soon, so I can stop messing with Android :)

  13. Peter says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 10:00 am

    Should we ask:

    Are there any more potential problems with regard to software patents for one program compared to another?

  14. oiaohm says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 10:09 am

    Strange I have seen nothing about this on the QT mailing lists. Could you please provide pointer on the QT mailing list?

    Also I am sorry to say this is past wrong. QT and KDE where able have followed the Freedesktop.org specifications.

    The correct way to deal with this is simple truly get dconf if it will pass in as a Freedesktop.org specification or if not get something else into the Freedesktop.org specification doing it job.

    Reason this will solve the problem for all Windows Managers and Future programs. Most windows managers will take up Freedesktop standards no matter the toolkits they use then those standard push from them down into toolkits.

    http://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Specifications If you look here you will see http://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Specifications/icon-theme-spec, http://www.freedesktop.org/wiki/Specifications/xsettings-spec Both were starting down the path to integration of the Windows managers and toolkits. Never got far enough never had enough support to get to a point of solving the Gnome/KDE dispute.

    http://code.google.com/p/gtk-qt-engine/ Yes GTK to QT has been going on for a while. Same class of hack.

    Failure to get an agreement over how this data should be stored has been on going pain. So windows manager after windows manager and distribution after distributions making hacks.

    Can we please end the hack cycle. Please enter a standard process to solve this once and all.

    Will this mean software like basket will have a chance of being shipped by default on Ubuntu?

  15. Alexander Rojas says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 10:15 am

    These are great news! I must say I have always like the look and feel from GTK better but as a developer Qt always made much more sense and now I use it for almost all of my projects. I cannot be more happy now.

  16. Jerome Leclanche says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 10:16 am

    I’m glad Ubuntu is finally deciding to embrace Qt. There are hundreds of amazing Qt apps out there which really deserve to be in Ubuntu, instead of their poor-quality GTK alternatives. Nautilus vs Dolphin comes to mind (And Dolphin isn’t even that good).

    Qt is an amazing toolkit. The documentation is very-well maintained (Really is the best online documentation I’ve ever seen). All the naming is extremely consistent. This makes Qt very easy to learn. New apps tend to be written for Qt as well as it’s so much more portable than Gtk. (Gtk on Windows looks horrible, while Qt looks completely native).

    I’m not really sure implementing a new QSettings backend is the right way to go. I personally use QSettings::IniFormat everywhere (more easily human-editable, easy to manually remove; I could go on).
    What I wonder is, how will adopting dconf in Qt help the adoption of Qt apps on GNOME? Qt apps can already exist wonderfully well on GNOME. KDE apps have a harder time, because they tend to start up tons of services when opening them. On all my GNOME systems, I instantly install Kate and Dolphin.
    What would help the adoption of Qt would be a better user-level integration. Graphical and usability-wise. This is work that has to be done on the GTK side as well, as there are many features simply lacking there. Gtk apps on Qt look horrible (I use XChat, Synaptic and Pidgin on my KDE install).

    This settings stuff is a red herring…

  17. oiaohm says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 10:25 am

    Sorry I missed this but I do support for people using Wine. Wine uses freedesktop standards to integrate it self in. Part of the reason why windows programs inside wine look so out of place on the desktop is a lack of standard for storing the information WM and Toolkit independent as a standard.

  18. John says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 10:35 am

    I would have thought that “* does it integrate with the system settings and preferences?” had more to do with using the POSIX locale instead of Qt’s ICU or the KDE locale files? Surely the first step is to get QLocale and KLocale to play nice on the host platform by using the host locale settings? Exactly what settings do Qt/KDE apps need to know that they have to read from DConf? Will you also require them to save their app settings into DConf when running under Gnome, cause that will mean the app has a different config when it runs under a KDE session which while rare is not exactly playing nice.

  19. Martin Owens says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 10:43 am

    Nice to see things move in a good direction with integration. I hear Akonadi suite and kmail are looking attractive these days and it would be very nice to have them integrated.

  20. Seung Soo, Ha says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 10:46 am

    A nice post!

    Qt will enrich Ubuntu for sure.

    Kudos for identifying and addressing problems on the way!

  21. oiaohm says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 10:51 am

    Akonadi also integrate under evolution.

    I agree with John the bigger question is what setting do QT need. And should they be in dconf in the first place. Remember at one point to register items in the menus of windows managers you had to access items like dconf.

  22. Jose says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 11:05 am

    Hello

    You talked about radical changes on the computer industry like the 16-bit to 32bit, witch I don’t agree with, it was more the change from Command line GUI to graphic GUI(when I disassembled win95 functions back in the day more than 90% code was still 16bits, code from MS DOS). You now talk about 32-64 as the next change when it is obvious now if you saw CES that it is tablets and natural interfaces like touch pen computing and voice recognition.

    What is going to do Ubuntu in this front? I mean, if you provide utouch but the majority of the applications does not support it(realtime scrolling update on browser, big buttons on the applications config tools…), some do, some does not, is going to be a complete mess. Apple created a system with only apps designed for multitouch, Android did exactly the same thing. Will ubuntu create a distro that works only with tablets and works?

    A lot of companies have years of work on c,c++ on POSIX, and can’t use this code on Android,just iOS(c,c++ works out of the box very easy), porting it to java-NDK would take so much resources, and will get interpreted code instead of compiled.

  23. LibertyZero says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 11:06 am

    QT is the *best* toolkit at present IMHO. It is widely spread, extremely well documented and it feels absolutely natural to work with. This is a step into the right direction. I’d actually like to see the real Unity based on QT and not just the 2D version of it.

  24. Aplicaciones Qt en Ubuntu (Mark Shuttleworth) | El Blog de Rigo says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 11:16 am

    [...] Mark Shuttleworth, acaba de escribir en su blog sobre la inclusión de las aplicaciones Qt en el cd de instalación de cara a las próximas versiónes, Ubuntu 11.04 y siguientes. [...]

  25. Flavio Tordini says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 11:23 am

    I develop Qt apps and, while they already integrate very well with the Ubuntu desktop, this kind of “official” endorsement by Ubuntu is great news.

    Will the dconf bindings be a QSettings backend? In that way it will be transparent to existing apps. I hope its not an entirely different API.

  26. Luca Ferretti says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 11:29 am

    It seems you forgot “is it accessible to people who are visually impaired” in criteria list.

  27. Wim Leers says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 11:32 am

    I’m not sure where/how Qt applications should be submitted for inclusion, so I’d like to point to a nice Sudoku application that I wrote for a university class a couple of years ago. It’s a fancy, feature-complete, cross-platform, translatable Sudoku app written in C++/Qt. Build scripts are available, so please give it a try: https://github.com/wimleers/sudoku/wiki.

  28. Sune Vuorela says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 11:32 am

    Hi

    Have you created a Qt api on top of a dconf library, or have you written a QSettings backend that uses dconf?
    The latter sounds really useful, and all existing Qt apps that uses QSettings as described in the apidocs would be able to benefit directly from it.

    Similar in kdelibs, there is KConfig, which also has the possibility for various backends, and could most likely easily grow a dconf backend as well. Then you immediate would get all KDE Applications to use dconf for their configuration.

    Yay for well thought and well written libraries.

  29. Ubuntu – Was kommt nach Natty? | Yet another Linux Blog says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 11:34 am

    [...] Ansätze, die Mark Shuttleworth da in seinem gerade veröffentlichten Blog-Eintrag zur weiteren Zukunft von Ubuntu [...]

  30. Bad VLC, bad! – Ixis's Blog says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 11:35 am

    [...] and that might be the reason to put Qt applications inside. Here’s link to orginal article: http://www.markshuttleworth.com/archives/568 January 18, 2011 – 11:13 | By ixis | Posted in Uncategorized | Comments (0) ← [...]

  31. SOURCES.LIST Aggregator » Blog Archive » Qt Applications To Be Evaluated For Inclusion On The Ubuntu CD Starting With Natty+1 says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 11:41 am

    [...] in Natty+1 but there are a few very good ones which have a pretty good chance! VLC anyone? [via Mark Shuttleworth] (CC) http://www.webupd8.org 2009-2011. | Daily Ubuntu / Linux news and application [...]

  32. Alexander Larsson says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 11:48 am

    What about GVfs integration. do you have any plans for that?

  33. Kelytha says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 11:53 am

    @Jose: Java is not an interpreted language, never was. It is unbelievable that such statements are still made in 2011.

    As for the better integration of Qt into Ubuntu: sounds like a great plan and I hope that it will succeed. Qt is an extremely powerful framework that sees very rapid improvements since Nokia bought Trolltech. Being a KDE user I also hope that more support for Qt will benefit KDE too. :)

  34. iaintme says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 11:58 am

    I wonder why the good old GNOME guys still let your blog get syndicated on GNOME Planet… It must be a matter of “unity”.

  35. that guy says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 12:08 pm

    Come on Mr Spaceman

    Everyone knows you have a hard on for Qt and if you had enough resources you would rewrite Gnome in the Qt toolkit. Its just that KDE doesn’t blend well with the plain and simple philosophy.

  36. Conscious User says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 12:13 pm

    “But I think it’s entirely plausible that dconf, once it has great Qt bindings, be considered by the KDE community.”

    But what if this never happens? Then you’re asking the KDE folks to support another configuration system with no real benefits to them, and creating a third world (Qt+dconf) in addition to the two that already exist.

    I fully support this direction in theory, but I’m interested in knowing what the KDE devs think about it now.

  37. Fale says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 12:27 pm

    I really don’t see why KDE guys should be happy with dconf… I would only like to remind what Seigo published some years ago: http://aseigo.blogspot.com/2005/04/stupidity-of-dconf.html

    Maybe things changed, but I do think that KDE has more powerful configs store systems…

  38. jepong says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 12:39 pm

    good move Mark! Hope this is the start of many development and innovation with Kubuntu and KDE as well.

  39. Qt apps on Ubuntu | Ubuntu News says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 12:51 pm

    [...] use it and be part of the Ubuntu experience – welcome.Originally posted by Mark Shuttleworth here on Tuesday, January 18th, 2011 at 9:01 [...]

  40. Jesse says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 12:59 pm

    It’s really nice to actually see Ubuntu see Qt for something great rather than an enemy now. This is just my opinion and only that. But the more I see coming out of Canonical and Ubuntu to make apps work with Ubuntu and the alike. Asking KDE to consider making it part of KDE. The more KDE loses it’s touch of what it is. Like the last time I heard, Canonical or someone else (cannot remember), wanted KDE to drop KIO for GIO. It seems KDE has to adapt everything for GNOME than GNOME has to of KDE.

  41. Kevin Krammer says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 1:11 pm

    @Conscious User: I think the idea is that the bindings will be low level enough to be used as a building block in QSettings and KConfig backends, thus not requiring any change on Qt/KDE application level.

    And then, once these Canonical developed backends prove to be viable due to wide spread testing in Ubuntu, they might become the default.

  42. Rajesh G says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 1:14 pm

    Excellent write-up! It would be great to get the best of both GNOME and KDE worlds in the default installation (say, KDE-PIM) – Hope it happens soon! :-)

  43. La fine dell’antagonismo KDE contro GNOME? « SimpliX SoftWorks – la collezione software ideale says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 1:15 pm

    [...] Mark Shuttleworth » Blog Archive » Qt apps on Ubuntu. [...]

  44. Qt w domyślnej instalacji Ubuntu - Najciekawsze Wiadomości z Sieci says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 1:29 pm

    [...] w domyślnej instalacji Ubuntu sty 18 Ubuntu W ostatnim wpisie na swoim blogu Mark Shuttleworth ogłosił rzecz przez dłuższy czas oczekiwaną przez [...]

  45. David Edmundson says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 1:41 pm

    As a KDE developer who often ends up porting GTK apps to Qt I can’t welcome this move enough!

    I have to read GTK/C and Qt/C++ code, and (I know this is subjective) but the latter is so much easier to read, and normally a lot lot smaller.

    Any time we end up duplicating the same application identically in two different toolkits, just for the sake of it, it’s a complete waste of everybody’s time (i.e usb-creator and ubiquity).

    It’s not saying we won’t have KDE and Gnome+Qt applications, but it will make it a hell of a lot easier to maintain both.

    This and the potential move in the KDE community so split up KDElibs to make them easier to use anywhere is going to make for a lot of excitement in the next few years.

    This is definitely a massive move in the right direction. Just keep posting when you’re hiring Qt coders :-P

  46. ¿Canonical pensando en incluir aplicaciones Qt por defecto en Ubuntu? | MuyLinux says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 1:55 pm

    [...] un repentino anuncio hecho el día de hoy, Mark Shuttleworth dice que tendrán que encontrar algo de espacio en el CD para incluir las bibliotecas Qt y que [...]

  47. Ubuntu integrará Qt mucho más en el futuro | MuyLinux says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 2:07 pm

    [...] Shuttleworth, el creador de Canonical, ha anunciado sus planes para las futuras versiones de Ubuntu más allá de Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal, que a [...]

  48. spockfish says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 2:16 pm

    Mark,

    Again you amaze me. In positive way :-) Although I like Ubuntu very much, there’s only one thing which kept me going back to another distro. And that was the absence of my favorite toolkit. And now you’re fixing this… Great!

  49. me4oslav says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 2:46 pm

    Awesome nws-now I don’t need to isntall QT it will come preinstalled.Plus this opens the chance for stuff like VLC,SMPlayer,Clementine,Minitube etc… to come installed with Ubuntu by default.
    Just hope that this doesn’t become a world war with Gnome folks,don’t wanna see neither projects get hurt by a great decision like including QT stuff in Ubuntu,after all QT!=KDE.

  50. g4b says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 2:59 pm

    If you look at history, kde folks always tried to integrate GTK apps as much as possible. It was not them leading to the schism anyway and all the reasons for the great divide – which had more to do with (valid) problems with Qt not being GPL on all platforms – have no basis now whatsoever anymore.
    But after years of flamewars, some of this negative feelings still continue. Because idealists and fanboys tend to get hardcore if they devote themselves blindly to their ideals or objects of admiration. Or even worse, define their ideals by having some kind of “enemy”.

    Of course, people are people, and our reservations towards things we dont agree on stay alive or even become more radical as we get older. Forgivness and acceptance still are things hard to learn by every human being.

    That said, it would be sad, if Gnome ppl would hold a grudge against steps like this. But sadly, also expectable. As every human likes to participate in bad talks, but not everybody takes it too seriously.

    But tossing some technology over to qt and kde enthusiasts also can be read as a somewhat arrogant move, if everything else is expected from them. If it fails to become used properly, and kde apps even get worse in ubuntu, it will only fuel people who smile and say “told you so”.

    Having such a small kubuntu team already makes it suffer a lot. I just hope, they will get help to also integrate these changes properly, together with having respect of the “KDE way” of doing things – which mostly is “older” anyway.

    canonical once chose gnome as flagship (I didnt like that move in particular). Maybe the reasons for this decisions are long gone now either, like the reason for the original kde-gnome war. We still have to live with consequences.

    Not everything is about free mind and diversity. Many things are split because of exact opposite reasons.
    But I like if somebody authentically says, he wants people to have choice.

    I dont envy your position, mark. :)

  51. Jens says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 3:01 pm

    I don’t think fitting the OS onto a CD should be of concern anymore. Ubuntu is designed for desktop (or notebook) use, and all modern desktops and notebooks have DVD drives. Please leave the minimalistic approach to other distributions and give us everything we need, not everything that fits into a 700 MB archive!

  52. Aplicativos QT no Ubuntu « Café com Pinguim says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 3:11 pm

    [...] Site: http://www.markshuttleworth.com/archives/568 [...]

  53. Daniel Kasza says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 3:27 pm

    ,,is it accessible to people who cannot use a mouse, or keyboard?”

    What? Did you ever try to use Ubuntu without a keyboard?
    There is no virtual keyboard for the lock screen, and no user-friendly interface to turn the lock screen off.
    There is also no virtual keyboard, when (for example) you want to edit the software sources in the software center.

  54. pprkut says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 3:47 pm

    I’m not a KDE developer, but I read blogs of kde developers very often.
    I recall to have read somewhere that kde’s configuration system supports backends. The blogs talked about one for elektra (couple of years ago, during the kde3-4 transition), and I don’t see how dconf should have different requirements. But since I’m not a developer I wouldn’t know how hard it is to implement such a backend, or how to tell kde apps to use it, or if that abstraction layer would even work for dconf at all.

    Just a pointer from a user that it might not be that difficult after all :)

  55. w1ngnut says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 3:51 pm

    Mr. Mark, you’re once again revolutionizing the Linux world. This is the kind of thought that makes all different, again. For years I’ve been following the Gnome community but, I don’t sense it in pace with the changes we see everyday and being locked to it sometimes prevents Ubuntu from innovating more and more. There are excellent apps written in QT with a brilliant community so, this is what Ubuntu needs to be… a layer of innovation on top of all of that (with linux kernel running below).

    Thanks for your efforts!

  56. Carl Simpson says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 3:53 pm

    Some comments have said that there is no real reason for KDE developers to adopt dconf, since it brings no benefit to them. That may be- I don’t know. It’s also possible that KDE applications are integrated into other KDE technology that would preclude them from inclusion by default on the Ubuntu CD.

    I don’t feel that this is too big a deal, though. Even though existing applications might not be able- or might not want- to meet with the criteria for inclusion in Ubuntu, what all of this does is to bring closer a situation where, when developing new applications for Ubuntu, the choice of toolkit is wide open and subject to the developers’ discretion.

    It means that where before there has been KDE/Qt and Gnome/Gtk, and that’s that, now there is a chance to break those associations, and build applications that are integrated into Gnome, but that also leverage Qt.

  57. Christopher Denter says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 3:54 pm

    Nice.

    I personally quite like Qt as a developer; so I do appreciate this open-mindedness.

    I would, however, consider replacing the CDs with DVDs to get rid of the problems of squeezing as much as possible into only 700 MB (mid-term).

  58. Markus S. says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 3:54 pm

    While I’m not sure whether dconf is beneficiary for Qt/KDE applications, the next generation Gwibber version and the Qt-only version of Marble are certainly great additions to Ubuntu.

  59. ecyrbe says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 4:01 pm

    Oh no! Having Qt libs isn’t going to work for me. I’m really considering swithing to a stock gnome debian without mono for the next release of ubuntu.

  60. Shane Fagan says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 4:10 pm

    TBH I think we are getting to the point where we probably should be using a DVD. We could do a lot of things like include Samba on the disk or special Zeitgeist logic to relevancy or some interesting Banshee extensions like mirage the list goes on and on. We could fill 7 GB of space with a lot of awesome stuff. The only things to think of that would stop us is bandwidth and the CD distribution around releases to locos and conferences..etc.

  61. Anil says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 4:17 pm

    Cool!

  62. dragonbite says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 4:27 pm

    This sounds like a wonderful move, alongside Unity, that may bring together the two camps into a middle ground where the choice is on the best available rather than the best built for the environment. Kudos and good luck!

  63. Anil says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 4:28 pm

    oh btw mark, your copyright still reads 2006-2007 :P (not sure if it’s intentional)

  64. Ubuntu incluirá aplicaciones Qt por defecto says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 4:46 pm

    [...] un entorno de escritorio basado, en su rama principal, en GNOME y GTK pero, según podemos leer en el blog de Mark Shuttleworth, el equipo de desarrollo de Ubuntu está “buscando sitio” en el CD de instalación de [...]

  65. Anders Wallenquist says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 4:58 pm

    Don’t forget to harmonize gvfs/gio and the file open and save dialogs. Directories with shared files that are mounted thru gvfs/gio today are viewable with Gnome applications but not by KDE/QT KIO-using applications. The view of the filesystem are totaly different with applications like Inkscape (gtk) and Scribus (qt) that is supposed to cooperate with files, that is not good. This is also a problem with other not genuine Gnome applications today like Firefox and in some cases OpenOffice.

    Maybe the project KioGio-bridge http://live.gnome.org/KioGioBridge can be a solution for this?

  66. Joseph Smidt says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 4:59 pm

    Excellent choice. Is there already a list of applications that are being considered for inclusion?

  67. anzan says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 5:06 pm

    Unlike some other current directions Canonical is taking with Ubuntu, this could come to be of very real benefit to other distributions and to Linux as a whole. Thank you.

  68. motorslav says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 5:19 pm

    DVD/CD who uses them there is USB.
    @Jospehh Smidt Excellent question,there should be a list of applications.

  69. lefty.crupps says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 5:21 pm

    One thing tha prevents GTK, Qt, and KDE apps from functioning ‘properly’ on various desktops is that they all use different File Open dialogs, Print dialogs, etc. If this could be standardized in the backend to use the File and Print dialogs of the desktop, not of the toolkit or app, that would be wonderful. Then KDE users could use SFTP://path/to/remote/file and Gnome users can continue with the confusing ‘single click on the desktop if you want it, but only double-click in the file dialogs’…

  70. Philip Van Hoof says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 5:24 pm

    Great news. The more integration between Qt and Gtk+, the better! Thanks Canonical for sponsoring this work.

  71. Tom Hodgins says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 5:25 pm

    Well said, I look forward to this collaboration as I currently prefer KDE and many of its apps, but enjoy the Gnome setup of Ubuntu as it is installed.

  72. Pavel says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 6:05 pm

    good to see this push finally happening. The different handling of Qt and Gtk applications was an obstacle for a long enough time now. In the end this will mean that whether it is Gtk or Qt doesnt matter any more, which is great.
    Qt was my personal preference for some time now as it simply innovates faster than Gtk and seeing it in MeeGo was great.
    Now seeing it in Ubuntu is even better, as it finally makes Qt really cross-plattform. Look native on MeeGo, looks native on Ubuntu, looks native on Windows.
    I just hope that the Ubuntu/ MeeGo based tablets come out soon, so I can stop messing with Android :)

  73. Roman says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 6:30 pm

    GTK and Glib itself have a solid and (almost) polished c code. It’s needless to add yet another cpp lib with all-in-one.
    And about unity 2D: it’s your marketing FAIL.

  74. komputes says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 6:31 pm

    I would recommend evaluating krdc over vinaigre. Some good reasons are explained in Bug #702103. Although there may be challenges to overcome if it doesn’t integrate with other applications, particularly empathy’s remote desktop via XMPP feature.

  75. Adam says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 6:43 pm

    So what apps do you have in mind? I have little experience of Qt apps so would be interested in trying them before Natty+1.

  76. Jonathan RIddell says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 6:44 pm

    > If this could be standardized in the backend to use the File and Print dialogs of the desktop

    With Qt this is the case.

  77. Some Further Notes On Qt In Ubuntu | jonobacon@home says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 7:18 pm

    [...] recently blogged about plans to make Qt a first-class citizen alongside GTK in Ubuntu. He outlined the reason for [...]

  78. Марк Шаттлворт планирует включить Qt-приложения в базовую поставку Ubuntu | AllUNIX.ru – Всероссийский портал о UNIX-системах says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 7:19 pm

    [...] Шаттлворт, сообщил в своём блоге, что в осеннем выпуске Ubuntu 11.10 в состав базовой системы [...]

  79. Desde Natty +1 (11.10) Qt tendrá mayor lugar en Ubuntu « Soft-Libre says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 7:50 pm

    [...] lo ha anunciado Mark Shuttleworth en su blog en el día de hoy. Dada la posibilidad de contar con Unity 2D mediante librerías Qt entre otras y el gran trabajo [...]

  80. enedene says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 8:30 pm

    This is great news, artificial barriers should not exist. Let the best application win.

  81. Some Further Notes on Qt in Ubuntu | Ubuntu News says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 8:40 pm

    [...] Further Notes on Qt in UbuntuBy akgraner | Published: 2011-01-18Mark recently blogged about plans to make Qt a first-class citizen alongside GTK in Ubuntu. He outlined the reason for [...]

  82. Fulano says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 9:24 pm

    “CD”? People still uses them?

  83. BigWhale says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 9:25 pm

    Yes! We need better integration and we need things to work smoothly. Having Qt in the default install is a great news. With a proper default theme and dconf support it should be easy to develop ‘native’ Ubuntu applications in Qt.

    Just make sure that python bindings are also there. :)

  84. Luke Yelavich says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 9:36 pm

    I second Luca’s comment. QT at present, is inaccessible for those who use various assistive technologies such as screen readers or on-screen keyboards. There is work going on in the community to finish the QT at-spi bridge, but thsi work is not commercially funded, and is on a best effort and as time permits basis.

  85. Mathias says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 10:06 pm

    To get an better judgement of your proposal: Are there any Qt applications which already meet your first two criterion and therefore should be considered for default installation? Fixing violations of the remaining criterion should be pure engineering exercises.

  86. Ashish Ranjan says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 10:11 pm

    @Shane,@Christopher

    or, we can go for distribution in two modes
    either a) two CDs
    OR, b) one DVD with 700MB CD * 2 = 1400 MB limit in that

  87. Marco says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 10:15 pm

    Very smart move. To open Ubuntu even more to Qt-Apps is very clever. Qt is gaining so much track at the moment and making it easier to integrate apps from Meego-based systems offer a lot of opportunity.

    Thanks guys

  88. Jose says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 10:52 pm

    I agree we are getting to a time when we should use a DVD too. The compression needed to put all what is needed in 700mb is huge, will take a lot of resources of the computer and makes Ubuntu not provide important packages on standard distro.

    You also need to provide art to compete with Apple and Microsoft, I suppose you don’t provide good quality pictures for the desktop background or good themes because of the CD restriction. That is huge for people like me, I’m writing this on a mac and I realize having used it for a year that is so beautiful and ubuntu so ugly, I love linux because is so powerful, but the aesthetics and design are not geeks strength. When I show a project to my mom on a ubuntu screen, she asked me: Why the windows are so ugly? My father who is an artist painter said exactly the same thing(“the color palette this is using doesn’t match at all, if you use bright orange on buttons you need to soft it, and etc, etc”) and is common quote when I show it to friends.

    It is like someone that go to a party or a business meeting without shaving, dirty hair, stinking just because “the important is in the inside”, is going to be more difficult for him to connect with other people, some people will consider this essential for a relationship. The same way, being so ugly makes convincing people to use linux harder, some people will consider aesthetics essential(artists).

    By beautiful I don’t mean copying Apple, just make it aesthetically pleasant with their own style. If you don’t want to spend money on it the community could if you provide some way people could collaborate economically in specific projects. I think you are convinced that donations doesn’t work, and I agree, if people donate to “ubuntu” but other people decide how this money is expended, people want to collaborate in “this specific project, with this people” and not the other, like you do when you buy an app from the appstore. I

  89. edwood says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 11:00 pm

    Mark,

    When you say free, do you mean, as in beer?

  90. Bruno says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 11:01 pm

    This is great. More and more developers are switching to Qt, it is a good news Ubuntu will not stay behind.

  91. Gibizz News » News of ‘Natty Narwhal’ Preview What’s Next For Ubuntu (PC World) says: (permalink)
    January 18th, 2011 at 11:07 pm

    [...] it’s been the subject of some debate, there’s also been word that wrote on his blog. “We should evaluate apps on the basis of how well they meet the requirement, not prejudice [...]

  92. Martin N says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 12:05 am

    Very shrewd strategy there, Canonical! Investing in establishing Qt as a baseline toolkit for Ubuntu apps atop Wayland… Sounds like you’re carving out a GUI platform for Linux, akin to what Apple’s done w/OS X. I am curious to know if – and I can’t see why not but correct me if I’m wrong – Wayland can have the same PDF/PostScript style rendering implemented a la Quartz style eventually?

    I think Intel (even IBM too) should be all over this project, throwing their engineering weight behind establishing dominance on the desktop 10+ years from now. Microsoft may be edging out everyone on the desktop currently, but they are on autopilot and pretending to know their ass from a hole in the ground, but 5-10 years from now, provided Microsoft stays complacent and devoid of innovation, Linux can have a viable desktop running on Wayland w/all the X legacy on-board, and a genuinely good toolkit like Qt, ported natively to run atop Wayland, disentangled from the X legacy while at the same time allowing it to exist, much like OS X does.

    MeeGo is also a welcome addition to the mobile space, where Android is entangled w/Oracle lawsuits and OS X is about the only solid choice for mobile development. The only thing that might be a slight turn off for developers is Qt’s C++ nature… but then, for each VM language, there will probably be bindings for Qt anyway.

    Intel & Canonical can rule Earth’s desktops in about 10 years! Not to mention that the rest of the world (non-USA) loves Linux!

  93. Patrick Dickey says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 12:08 am

    This is a great move. The Planet KDE reply was more about why Canonical needs to rethink the idea that the developers should make their apps “Ubuntu format” and “everyone else format” (quotes are mine–not quotations from their reply).

    Is it possible to have an interpreter (for lack of a better word) or intermediary between the QT libraries and the desktop/GNOME shell? One that interprets the QT commands for File/Open, Print, and other things that are handled differently, and sends the proper commands to the dconf subsystem.

    If this is possible, this would be the best solution. That way the developers would only have to make one version of their apps. And the subsystem will make the apps flow smoothly with Ubuntu.

    For more information about what the KDE People have to say, check out this blog: http://aseigo.blogspot.com/2011/01/qt-acceptance-growing-next-colaboration.html

    Have a great day:)
    Patrick.

  94. mark says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 12:30 am

    The issue is not solely that of storage – it’s also of dynamic application, which is a preferred user experience. In KDE, you have to apply settings, in GNOME, where possible, they are applied in real time.

  95. Luca Cappelletti says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 1:06 am

    +1
    Qt is “the” framework that at the moment can compete against “App Store” and “Market” objects.
    We lost the Android compatibility and the huge “do nothing” apps…but embracing Qt we can start to be more closed to the next Nokia Qt based app repository.
    Today the App is the computer and embracing Qt help us to be more lined up with the needs to be more app-centric a despite religiousware thinkerers…

  96. DITB says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 1:10 am

    Mark? ????

  97. News of ‘Natty Narwhal’ Preview What’s Next For Ubuntu (PC World) – Linux Guide Online says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 1:11 am

    [...] it’s been the subject of some debate, there’s also been word that wrote on his blog. “We should evaluate apps on the basis of how well they meet the requirement, not prejudice [...]

  98. Canonical 要将 Qt 应用带入 Ubuntu : OSMSG says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 3:39 am

    [...] 的创始人 Mark Shuttleworth 在自己的博客中发表通告说,可能会在 Natty 之后的 Ubuntu 11.10 中内置 Qt [...]

  99. Things are really heating up for Natty — lostsonsvault says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 3:41 am

    [...] Mark Shuttleworth’s blog [...]

  100. Grirk » Blog Archive » Ubuntu เปิดทางสำหรับโปรแกรมที่เขียนด้วย Qt เข้ามาในดิสโทร says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 4:49 am

    [...] ที่มา - Mark Shuttleworth [...]

  101. zloy.pingvin says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 6:39 am

    это хороший шаг.
    но мне кажется 700 мб это уже очень мало.надо что то над этим думать

  102. Марк Шаттлворт планирует включить Qt-приложения в базовую поставку Ubuntu | Компания "Alllinux" says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 7:10 am

    [...] Шаттлворт, сообщил в своём блоге, что в осеннем выпуске Ubuntu 11.10 в состав базовой системы [...]

  103. Mandy Sauls says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 7:19 am

    Really Good Article: #MS
    http://arstechnica.com/open-source/news/2011/01/inclusion-of-qt-in-ubuntu-1110-is-a-win-for-developers.ars

    ITS On:
    Collabs OS Platform
    Qt
    Nokia Canonical Ubuntu #UDS #Mobile

  104. Fred says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 8:26 am

    F I N A L L Y

    Thank you!

  105. Gary Martin says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 8:46 am

    Mr. Shuttleworth

    This is exactly the direction Ubuntu/Canonical need to be going after. A great partnership can be developed by Ubuntu/Canonical with Nokia QT. This may be one of the vehicles that may help both companies gain market share in the enterprise. I love what you guys have accomplished so far with Ubuntu One and would like to see a real cloud alternative to Google Apps put into motion with Server-side backup and a Desktop solution to compliment. I have been using Ubuntu exclusively since 2005 and would like to thank you for your vision and the communities vigilance in creating a product that puts consumers and enterprises of all sizes on a level playing field.

  106. MeeGoUser says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 9:03 am

    Qt is the Future!

    A REALLY SMART MOVE!

    More apps for all desktop Linux users coming from Symbian/MeeGo.

    Time to put the Android Java VM walled garden to sleep.

  107. Anders Wallenquist says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 9:39 am

    Dconf is a backend for storing configuration data. In a possible future the gtk GSettings-library can use other backends than dconf, on Windows the backend is registry already today. For example, if we use DesktopCouch as backend for configuration data, we can share the same configurations between several computers when syncing to UbuntuOne or a private CouchDB-server. Imagine sharing the same configuration for Evolution, Empathy and Gwibber on all computers… But that future will only come true for gtk-applications if the common ground for sharing configuration data between QT and GTK are dconf – the backend. A better solution whould be to find a common API at the same level as GSettings that share the same mechanisms using several backends for data store.

  108. Raseel says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 10:39 am

    This seems to be one of the boldest decisions by Mark so far.
    Having said that, I hope that the Kubuntu factions will not be disgruntled since the Ubuntu folks will now have native support for Qt applications.
    On the other hand, if Canonical manages to pull this off we face new questions :
    - Will Kubuntu try to put in support for Gtk applications in their default installs ?
    - Will Ubuntu see imports of other Desktop Environments like Enlightenment

  109. Jim Campbell says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 12:10 pm

    Hi Mark – will contributions to the dconf bindings that you’re working on be subject to Canonical’s contributor agreement? I hope that you would be willing to keep them free from this, as Nokia has kept Qt itself free from such contributor agreements.

  110. Stanbr says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 12:26 pm

    That’s cool. I like QT itself, but I prefer the Gnome way over KDE, that’s why I use Gnome. So I think that’s the best of both worlds.

    btw: will you fix the copy and past bugs on the next release? ;-)

  111. Mike says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 12:27 pm

    I really don’t understand why this is supposed to be so big news? remember that Ubuntu is based on Debian’s development version. Debian has always had Qt, Qt apps and KDE desktop as a official part of distribution. So it’s ridiculous that now suddenly Ubuntu guys say “hey we are going to add Qt to distro, isn’t that cool new feature?” I don’t really understand why Ubuntu is Split in Ubuntu, Kubuntu and Xubuntu etc. Why didn’t you do like Debian right from the beginning? Debian supports several desktops and both GTK+ and Qt. User can then select which he wants to use and install. Debian installer allows that, and you can also install eg. Qt and KDE later too directlöy from official repository.

  112. Sorpigal says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 12:35 pm

    Ugh. Who wants dconf? Its recommendation is only that it isn’t as bad as gconf, but that’s no recommendation at all!

    A fd.o configuration API standard would be most welcome, but I doubt that you could get broad agreement on dconf. I know that Ubuntu doesn’t run on broad agreement like the rest of us do, so you can push dconf under Qt if you like, but it’s better in the long run to work with the community and gain consensus and support than to go it alone and potentially collapse under the weight of single-handed support.

  113. Ubuntu将引入Qt 应用程序 | VedaClub says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 12:35 pm

    [...] 应用程序引入默认Ubuntu安装包的可行性。Mark Shuttleworth 今天在他的博客中宣告了这一政策的变革。 Ubuntu has always had a Gtk+-policy (well, Firefox and OpenOffice were the exceptions), but [...]

  114. mariuz says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 12:37 pm

    Dear Mark do you know that gconf sux ?

    http://aseigo.blogspot.com/2005/04/stupidity-of-dconf.html
    What is wrong with .conf files ? and why do push something that is more complex and doesn’t solve anything

  115. Canonical and Shuttleworth add Qt to Ubuntu Linux | BeeHiveTech.com says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 1:59 pm

    [...] will work. Now, though, Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical, Ubuntus corporate big brother, is bringing Qt software to Ubuntu, long a GNOME [...]

  116. Ubuntu To Include Qt Applications | Up-to-Date says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 2:22 pm

    [...] After years of focussing entirely on Gtk+ and GNOME, Ubuntu will finally start evaluating Qt applications for inclusion in the defaukt Ubuntu installation. Mark Shuttleworth announced the policy change on his blog today. [...]

  117. Mark Shuttleworth announces inclusion of Qt applications in default Ubuntu install says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 2:30 pm

    [...] exists seperate distributions for each Desktop environment, viz. GNOME and KDE (Kubuntu)In his blog, Mark explains his controversial decision by pointing out that Canonical is dedicated to providing [...]

  118. Ubuntu incluirá las librerías Qt says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 3:26 pm

    [...] Blog de Mark Shuttleworth Tags: Canonical, Mark Shuttleworth, Natty Narwhal, qt, [...]

  119. nils says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 3:50 pm

    It is eclecticism what that…

  120. Qt en Ubuntu | MeeGo Argentina says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 5:25 pm

    [...] información: Mark Shuttleworth Blog [...]

  121. lAlexander Bisogiannis says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 6:14 pm

    Mark, why don’t you just theme KDE, and be done with it?

    I just did it, and in 10 minutes I have a 98% identical appearance to Ubuntu. Plus I have all the added functionality of KDE. And if I fubar by setup, then I just click on the “Defaults” button in settings, and thats it.

    I mean developer time could be used to more interesting stuff than theming, don’t you agree?

  122. bernstein says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 8:01 pm

    while i think kde is the better desktop, i keep using gnome. the thing is, while kde has so many cool concepts, technology & features, as .5 release it is still slow, buggy & cluttered and in dire need of a talended UI designer.
    but not so for qt. i’ve always thought of it as THE ui toolkit for any application, be it linux, mac or windows. so this is indeed great news! be it for running applications coming to linux, new linux apps choosing qt over gtk or qt influx into the gnome based ubuntu desktop.

  123. Bourne Shell says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 8:31 pm

    Please Mark, DVD this time! The CD is too restricting for general IT use. Let me explain why. In college, I got three people coming to me, telling me they wanted to “install ubuntu” and asked my help. The problem was that some of them had no internet, and after one installed Ubuntu, there were a lot of missing software he wanted to download. It was very problematic for me to make an aptoncd for him. It would be so much easier if I ever had a DVD with much more packages to install some important set of software.

  124. Марк Шаттлворт планирует включить Qt-приложения в базовую поставку Ubuntu | Ubuntu says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 9:33 pm

    [...] 11.10 Комментариев нет Марк Шаттлворт, сообщил в своём блоге, что в осеннем выпуске Ubuntu 11.10 в состав базовой системы [...]

  125. Penelope says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 10:21 pm

    I think the idea of really opening up for QT apps for Ubuntu is interesting and probably a really good long-term goal, however, I am very concerned that it will reduce the accessibility of Ubuntu. Your post mentions accessibility for those who cannot use a mouse or keyboard, but do not mention screen readers or other alternate ways of accessing Ubuntu. Right now at-spi does not integrate with QT and while it is being worked on, there is no funding so it could take years to get done. Does this mean that Canonical will help fund this process to make sure that Ubuntu does not lose accessibility features for any added QT apps or will accessibility be left waiting to catch up?

  126. Ubuntu 11.04 “Natty Narwhal”, ecco le novità - The New Blog Times says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 10:57 pm

    [...] sviluppate con Qt per inserirle nel CD con l’installazione predefinita di Ubuntu”, ha scritto il dirigente sul suo blog. “Dovremo valutare sulla scorta di come esse rispondono ai [...]

  127. Gibizz News » News of ‘Natty Narwhal’ Previews What’s Next For Ubuntu (PC World) says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 11:11 pm

    [...] it’s been the subject of some debate, there’s also been word that wrote on his blog. “We should evaluate apps on the basis of how well they meet the requirement, not prejudice [...]

  128. News of ‘Natty Narwhal’ Previews What’s Next For Ubuntu (PC World) – Linux Guide Online says: (permalink)
    January 19th, 2011 at 11:12 pm

    [...] it’s been the subject of some debate, there’s also been word that wrote on his blog. “We should evaluate apps on the basis of how well they meet the requirement, not prejudice [...]

  129. Jahrmando » Blog Archive » Canonical planea incluir Qt oficialmente en ubuntu says: (permalink)
    January 20th, 2011 at 1:31 am

    [...] via Mark Shuttleworth Marcarlo en Delicious Marcar este post Recomendar en Facebook Compartir Linkedin Compartir via MySpace Compartir via Reddit Compartir con Stumblers Tumblr este Tweet about it Subscribe to the comments on this post Tell a friend Gnu/linux Canonical, Gnu/linux, ubuntu [...]

  130. η Qt στο Ubuntu και “παραθυράκι” και για KDE εφαρμογές; « elkosmas.gr says: (permalink)
    January 20th, 2011 at 3:06 am

    [...] του (την Natty Narwhal) που αναμένουμε τον Απρίλιο του 2011 η Canonical θα εξετάσει αν θα συμπεριλάβει εφαρμογές Qt στο … καθώς θα έχει μεταξύ άλλων στο CD εγκατάστασης και τις [...]

  131. [Sondaggio] QT: favorevoli o contrari al loro inserimento su Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal? - Chimera Revo says: (permalink)
    January 20th, 2011 at 12:18 pm

    [...] preambolo. Non ne ho parlato fin ora perchè non ho trovato il tempo di leggere integralmente il post di Shuttleworth (creatore ed amministratore delegato di Ubuntu) e ho voluto evitare di scrivere supposizioni che [...]

  132. Juan Due says: (permalink)
    January 20th, 2011 at 1:16 pm

    Hope this does not start another religious war. I bet an average computer user does not know, or care, what a toolkit is. As long as an application is good, it does not metter to me in what toolkit is written. Better integration between GTK/Gnome and QT is nevertheless welcome.

  133. Qt dans Ubuntu ! Des morts à venir ? | Club Linux Atomic says: (permalink)
    January 20th, 2011 at 2:28 pm

    [...] 18 janvier c’est Mark Shuttleworth en personne qui annonçait que de la place sera réservée pour Qt sur le CD de Natty+1, c’est-à-dire Ubuntu 11.10, et que toute application se basant dessus se trouvait donc [...]

  134. truman says: (permalink)
    January 20th, 2011 at 3:13 pm

    You guys have needed 7 years to realize GTK is going nowhere. It’s no wonder chances of ever closing bug#1 are as slim now as when you started.

  135. Prof.Yeow says: (permalink)
    January 20th, 2011 at 4:08 pm

    thanks for this article, it’s very good.
    thanks again for the information.

  136. kikl says: (permalink)
    January 20th, 2011 at 10:31 pm

    Great news and well explained Mark. I think we all welcome more choice and better applications on the ubuntu desktop no matter which toolkit is used.

  137. Chauncellor says: (permalink)
    January 21st, 2011 at 8:20 am

    I, too, would like to voice concern of resources spent maintaining compression for 700 MB CDs. I’m genuinely curious: What is it that is preventing the decision to migrate to DVD? Being in a first-world country it is difficult to determine the status of the rest of the globe.

  138. Julius says: (permalink)
    January 21st, 2011 at 11:26 am

    I like change as long as it is heading a good direction. However, I am concerned with Mono (Banshee). Its too resource hog and it has Micro$oft Virus (Mono).

    Personally I prefer Rhythmbox over Banshee. I tested them both in my machine and Rhythmbox is better than banshee.

    Mark, may I suggest to hear from the voice of the users by making a sort of survey regarding Ubuntu regarding the packages/software to use. I know its your game but would it hurt your toy if you listen directly from the users?

    I like Ubuntu a lot. I used this operating system since I first build my own computer 3 years ago. Godspeed Ubuntu/Canonical…

  139. Jose says: (permalink)
    January 21st, 2011 at 1:32 pm

    @Kelytha: Java has always been interpreted. Java interprets bytecode.

  140. With Ubuntu’s shift to Qt in 11.10, an attack on the mobile sector must be imminent says: (permalink)
    January 21st, 2011 at 8:12 pm

    [...] come the end of 2011, is to become a standard component of Ubuntu 11.10. Ubuntu currently, and in the upcoming 11.04 Natty Narwhal distribution, uses Gtk+, a competing [...]

  141. tyler says: (permalink)
    January 21st, 2011 at 9:20 pm

    Fail Mark.

    KDE has been (and always will be) aesthetically (and functionally) inferior to Gnome.

    Looks like I may have to start looking at other distros.

  142. Valentin Rusu » Canonical adopte Qt, mais … says: (permalink)
    January 21st, 2011 at 9:39 pm

    [...] Depuis quelques jours, cette annonce de Mark Shuttleworth a été bien relayée par les grandes sources d’information liées aux logiciels libres : http://www.markshuttleworth.com/archives/568 [...]

  143. With Ubuntu’s shift to Qt in 11.10, an attack on the mobile sector must be imminent | hidekibonsai.com says: (permalink)
    January 22nd, 2011 at 12:17 am

    [...] come the end of 2011, is to become a standard component of Ubuntu 11.10. Ubuntu currently, and in the upcoming 11.04 Natty Narwhal distribution, uses Gtk+, a competing [...]

  144. oiaohm says: (permalink)
    January 22nd, 2011 at 12:50 am

    Jose there is an exception. gcj that turns java into native byte code. So making java more livecd usage friendly.

    Big thing bytecode based systems like normal Java(bytecode) and .net really have no place on a livecd. They are too ram binding. Move mono stuff onto disk two ie mono applications disk for desktop installs. Bring Rhythmbox back onto the livecd and that basically free up all the space you need to bring a few QT applications.

    The big thing to always remember livecd cannot depend on the existence of swap-space. So has to use tricks like compressing contents in ram and deallocating mapped files that can be reread at a latter date from the disk.

    Mono is basically build at run in a lot of places creating memory that cannot be deallocated to make way for other applications.

    Personally the biggest mistake Ubuntu is making is not sorting what is suitable on full blown machine and what is suitable on a livecd. Yes its nice to show exactly what the final system will work like. But including stuff that causes Livecd to run bad is not good.

    Chauncellor Think knoppix. Its a compressed DVD these days and they still want more. Basically will not matter what size media you have people will want more

  145. mark says: (permalink)
    January 22nd, 2011 at 1:21 am

    @Tyler

    First, the use of the term “fail” as a commentary on a statement of intent is generally not a sign of thoughtful analysis. I’m not sure of the degree to which you have considered your position, but your inability to read the piece where I said “KDE apps are not automatically considered, we’re talking about new Qt apps that fit in” suggests not much.

    In addition, your grand hand-wavy statement that KDE-is-inferior-to-GNOME is precisely the sort of half-witted playground name-calling (“you’re ugly and your mother dresses you funny”) that distinguishes vulgar tourists from those who participate in open source to make it better. Next you’ll be spouting off that the GPL is superior to BSD. In fact, both KDE and GNOME serve their users well, have distinct values and work hard to achieve a great result. Their goals are equally noble. Your commentary, alas, is not.

  146. salemboot says: (permalink)
    January 22nd, 2011 at 1:53 am

    Enlightenment (E16) was always seen as the dream desktop. We use to drool over the AcceleratedX X distribution. It was a paid product.

    Consider building off Rasterman’s libraries. E17 looks to be the next thing for the bang.

  147. Chauncellor says: (permalink)
    January 22nd, 2011 at 6:26 am

    oiaohm: I think your reasoning is unfounded. The concern is not about finding more things to fill but on the sheer amount of manpower that is continually needed to keep the final size under 700 MB. Windows 7 and OSX don’t even use up all of the space on the DVD and they are incredibly “bloated”, as they call it.

  148. Barbie says: (permalink)
    January 22nd, 2011 at 1:08 pm

    @Tyler

    Fail Tyler.

    Free Will we are all seekers in OS!

    Nobody has all the answers.

  149. tyler says: (permalink)
    January 23rd, 2011 at 3:19 am

    Wow, looks like I managed to strike a nerve. ;)

    Of course there was no thoughtful analysis Mark, I read your post and typed a quick reply (maybe 10 seconds). And stating that one offering is inferior to another isn’t quite “half-witted playground name-calling”, it’s just an opinion based on my observations of both environments.

    I said what I said simply in relation to my experiences with KDE and Gnome. Visually, Qt apps remind me of Windows 95. That’s all it is, you’re reading far too much into what I said (or just REALLY took offense to ~20 words).

    And Barbie, I didn’t say anything about Gnome (or anyone) having all the answers. All I know is Gnome and GTK apps look a hell of a lot nicer than KDE and Qt apps.

  150. Linux DE的未来 | 繁星之眠 says: (permalink)
    January 23rd, 2011 at 9:59 am

    [...] 这时的 Linux 世界,应该是 Unity 和 KDE 并存,这里同样有变数。Ubuntu 他们有没能力用 Qt 写出一个跟 KDE 同样庞大的项目。从之前 Ubuntu 捐赠 KDE 服务器,到后面Mark写博引入Qt所说的 Nevertheless, should a KDE app learn to talk dconf in addition to the standard KDE mechanisms, which… [...]

  151. Qt in the land of Gnome-based desktops: The issue of copyright in Free software « Notes from the mousepad says: (permalink)
    January 23rd, 2011 at 5:43 pm

    [...] GNOME, Qt | Jan 23rd, 2011 | No Comments » Recently Mark Shuttleworth wrote about how Qt will become part of the Ubuntu 11.10 desktop, and that Qt-based apps will eventually be considered as possible default Ubuntu apps. Obviously, [...]

  152. News of ‘Natty Narwhal’ Previews What’s Next For Ubuntu (PC World) | Websbay says: (permalink)
    January 23rd, 2011 at 8:58 pm

    [...] it’s been the subject of some debate, there’s also been word that wrote on his blog. “We should evaluate apps on the basis of how well they meet the requirement, not prejudice [...]

  153. News of ‘Natty Narwhal’ Preview What’s Next For Ubuntu (PC World) | Websbay says: (permalink)
    January 23rd, 2011 at 8:58 pm

    [...] it’s been the subject of some debate, there’s also been word that wrote on his blog. “We should evaluate apps on the basis of how well they meet the requirement, not prejudice [...]

  154. With Ubuntu’s shift to Qt in 11.10, an attack on the mobile sector must be imminent | Self Hosted WordPress Blog says: (permalink)
    January 24th, 2011 at 1:58 am

    [...] come the end of 2011, is to become a standard component of Ubuntu 11.10. Ubuntu currently, and in the upcoming 11.04 Natty Narwhal distribution, uses Gtk+, a competing [...]

  155. With Ubuntu’s shift to Qt in 11.10, an attack on the mobile sector must be imminent | Rott Weilers and Everything Else says: (permalink)
    January 24th, 2011 at 10:09 am

    [...] come the end of 2011, is to become a standard component of Ubuntu 11.10. Ubuntu currently, and in the upcoming 11.04 Natty Narwhal distribution, uses Gtk+, a competing [...]

  156. Shuttleworth: pensiamo a Qt su Ubuntu | oneOpenSource says: (permalink)
    January 24th, 2011 at 1:50 pm

    [...] di stupire qualche utente/sviluppatore: il patron di Ubuntu ha infatti dichiarato di voler includere le librerie Qt nelle prossime versioni di [...]

  157. capt jack harkness says: (permalink)
    January 24th, 2011 at 4:30 pm

    >All I know is Gnome and GTK apps look a hell of a lot nicer than KDE and Qt apps.

    I would love just once for a discussion not to devolve in the childish ‘my desktop is the bestest’.
    If your personal taste is to be used as a barometer, then fine, we will all agree with you since that’s all you know. Quick now… which should we like more? Vanilla or chocolate ice cream?

    The Qt move is the right one. I know that some of the diehard fanatics who started GNOME because KDE wasnt free enough will have fits but it really is a fine tool that is always moving ahead. Its importance in mobile is a great plus.

    I do agree with A.Seigo that the Ubuntu way of going about this is all wrong.
    Im a bit lazy so I will copy and paste from his blog that someone kindly posted in the comments here:

    “To get applications working together as well as possible, the answer is not to start creating Ubuntu-targeted versions of Qt apps, but to work on the issues below the application developer’s line of sight. If settings are an issue, then there are two avenues that should be pursued: identification of which settings ought to be widely shared and identification of management processes that ought to be shared. The former can be approached through standardization if nothing else, and the latter is probably a technology problem.

    Solving this means working together, not thinking that we are individually capable of coming up with the best ideas ever and that the world should simply bend to our whim of the day. That is a strategy fraught with risk and is socially unrealistic given the number of stakeholders.”

    I would have hoped that Mark would have talked to the Qt people before he made his final decision.

    He took the right decision but will go on implementing it the wrong way and all of free software loses.

    Then again, many of us devs are trying so hard to cross the artificial bridges that are created in FLOSS, and instead we have to fight agaisnt the Androidization of the desktop.

  158. With Ubuntu’s shift to Qt in 11.10, an attack on the mobile sector must be imminent | 0845numbersonline.com says: (permalink)
    January 24th, 2011 at 6:24 pm

    [...] come the end of 2011, is to become a standard component of Ubuntu 11.10. Ubuntu currently, and in the upcoming 11.04 Natty Narwhal distribution, uses Gtk+, a competing [...]

  159. With Ubuntu’s shift to Qt in 11.10, an attack on the mobile sector must be imminent | Funk Sites says: (permalink)
    January 25th, 2011 at 4:00 am

    [...] come the end of 2011, is to become a standard component of Ubuntu 11.10. Ubuntu currently, and in the upcoming 11.04 Natty Narwhal distribution, uses Gtk+, a competing [...]

  160. Ubuntu vil implementerer Qt-apps i default-install | Techblog says: (permalink)
    January 25th, 2011 at 9:02 am

    [...] Efter flere år med fokus på udelukkende på GTK+ og GNOME har Ubuntu endelig meldt ud at de vil begynde at supporterer Qt-applikationer i deres default-installation. Mark Shuttleworth meddelte denne ændring på sin blog i dag. [...]

  161. Brett Alton says: (permalink)
    January 25th, 2011 at 3:22 pm

    Hey Mark, do you think you could add the Disqus plugin for your comments on this blog? It allows user to “vote up” comments they like and sort comments based on votes, popularity, lack of popularity, etc. and generally makes users feel more involved. Not a spokesperson, just a guy who enjoys using it on other sites and my own blog.

  162. my disposition depends says: (permalink)
    January 25th, 2011 at 9:03 pm

    @ tyler
    I think it’s quite reasonable to be offended at how your post was formatted. It’s a personal blog and consideration of ones thoughts is expected and deserved. To just write fail, etc., while acceptable other places, simply isn’t respectful on a blog. As for striking a nerve, I expect you really haven’t. You have, however, shed light on something…

    “but in my view what matters most is the solid relationship we have with people who actually write applications under the GNOME banner”
    “that distinguishes vulgar tourists from those who participate in open source to make it better”
    and, how it’s interpreted, “”Hope this does not start another religious war. ”

    …that some watching closely have suspected for some time now. Personally, I’m still waiting to hear about some watery tart who throws swords at chairmen ;) Unfortunately, because of an unconsidered attack, you have only served as ‘justification’ to further invalidate the voices of those who would see Free and open source software in a different context than canonical set forth by the “leading distribution”. Please, for the sake of everyone, be more considerate in the future :)

  163. Canonical to support Qt in Ubuntu | Maemo Nokia N900 says: (permalink)
    January 26th, 2011 at 9:58 am

    [...] Mark Shuttleworth has announced that Qt libraries will ship in the Ubuntu 11.10 CD. Ubuntu has always been a GTK based Linux VN:F [...]

  164. Qt, quando programmare è cute | Mobiquity says: (permalink)
    January 28th, 2011 at 10:12 am

    [...] la prossima versione di Ubuntu, la diffusa distribuzione Gnu-Linux legata a Gnome, la proporrà di default. Così facendo abiliterà la creazione di applicazioni facilmente utilizzabili in piattaforma [...]

  165. Ubuntu Might Ship With Qt Libraries | Dharmesh Patel says: (permalink)
    January 30th, 2011 at 2:15 pm

    [...] [Source : Mark Shuttleworth] [...]

  166. Easy cross platform dev says: (permalink)
    January 30th, 2011 at 3:56 pm

    [...] Gnome is becoming a primary development target of this framework. The recent decision to include Qt on the next release of Ubuntu along with the desire to develop solid Gnome bindings for Qt, sure indicates that Qt ubiquity in [...]

  167. Qt dans Ubuntu ! Des morts à venir ? « Florent Gallaire's Blog says: (permalink)
    January 30th, 2011 at 7:31 pm

    [...] 18 janvier c’est Mark Shuttleworth en personne qui annonçait que de la place sera réservée pour Qt sur le CD de Natty+1, c’est-à-dire Ubuntu 11.10, et que toute application se basant dessus se trouvait donc [...]

  168. Episode 11: ’cause you can’t build Ubuntu without some Python « Lococast.net says: (permalink)
    January 31st, 2011 at 1:21 pm

    [...] Shuttleworth – QT apps in ubuntu [...]

  169. Gerola says: (permalink)
    January 31st, 2011 at 6:54 pm

    Dear Mark,

    I’m trying to understand the new window of Ubuntu 11-4. Its really very hard to lis with it. No doubt the gnome is easier. If I’m wrong or someting else tell what I can do.
    Just to say I love Ubuntu from the first edition!
    Best regards!
    Gerola

    (Co-author book Manual do Linux Red Hat 9.0 (Fedora)
    PS. As you can see I change my mind from Red hat to Ubuntu!!!

  170. Alejandro Nova says: (permalink)
    February 1st, 2011 at 1:41 am

    @tyler
    If you are using Ubuntu, install qt4-qtconfig (sudo apt-get install qt4-qtconfig), and, under GNOME, press Alt+F2 and run “qtconfig”. You’ll get a dialog box. Where it says “Select GUI Style” choose “GTK+ Style”.

    Now your Qt apps will mimic perfectly your GTK+ settings, your GTK+ engine, and your theme, and they will be as ugly (or beautiful, if you prefer) as your GNOME desktop.

    About functionality… I can say exactly the opposite. Where was the ability to switch colors in GNOME before GNOME 2.18? And where is the ability of GNOME to fully mimic a KDE theme, just like Qt does?

  171. Ubuntu to open up to Qt toolkit | I Bleed Bits - Technology for Addicts says: (permalink)
    February 1st, 2011 at 9:40 pm

    [...] Canonical and the Ubuntu Project. Shuttleworth announced the decision on his blog on Tuesday, noting that, following the Linux platform’s Natty Narwhal release, the company will need to [...]

  172. skierpage says: (permalink)
    February 2nd, 2011 at 1:20 am

    “I read your post and typed a quick reply (maybe 10 seconds).”

    And there’s the problem. A poorly-written, unthinking post on the ‘net saves YOUR oh-so-precious time, but wastes the time of a thousand or more readers. It’s a staggeringly selfish and inconsiderate thing to do. The rule is: if you wouldn’t stand in line for your turn at the microphone to say the same piece in front of a similar-sized audience, then don’t do it in cyberspace.

  173. Andy Jackson says: (permalink)
    February 2nd, 2011 at 5:23 pm

    QT means many new apps & easy dev of features with high performance. Replacing worse GTK apps means better use of developer time. This accelerates Open Source’s improvement.

  174. redbeetles says: (permalink)
    February 4th, 2011 at 4:38 am

    Off topic: Hi Mark, i think you should give the unity launcher a name like you have named the unity application/file place as “Dash”. There are many suitable and great name for the unity launcher such as, “Counter”, “Trunk”, “Desklaunch” or “Sidetap”…

  175. leoplan2 says: (permalink)
    February 7th, 2011 at 10:46 pm

    I think Canonical should take care of Qt development, in case Nokia stops developing it. It may happen…

  176. Ubuntu Linux Getting Qt Toolkit | I Bleed Bits - Technology for Addicts says: (permalink)
    February 9th, 2011 at 6:27 pm

    [...] of the Linux distribution, said Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Canonical, in a blog on Tuesday. the announcement does not include Ubuntu 11.04 [...]

  177. marcell says: (permalink)
    February 11th, 2011 at 2:02 pm

    after the disaster elop just did i think it would be great if all of the angry qt devs will gather again in some serious fork.

  178. Enzam says: (permalink)
    February 12th, 2011 at 2:02 pm

    Hi, have you heard about the Nokia news? How it affects Ubuntu now?

  179. Roberto Bonacina says: (permalink)
    February 14th, 2011 at 8:37 pm

    Mark,
    what do you think about the recent Nokia/Microsoft alliance? What about the future of QT, in general and for Ubuntu?

    Bye,
    Roberto

  180. Satchi says: (permalink)
    February 15th, 2011 at 2:25 am

    So, are there still plans to ship QT with Ubuntu now that Nokia seems to have no long term business plans involving it?

  181. Ubuntu opens up to Qt toolkit | Business News- Market News- tweets says: (permalink)
    February 16th, 2011 at 7:24 pm

    [...] Shuttleworth announced the decision on his blog yesterday, noting that, following the Linux platform’s Natty Narwhal release, the company will need to assess the benefits of including Qt apps and frameworks with the disc and download installation by default. [...]

  182. Diego Viola says: (permalink)
    February 20th, 2011 at 11:39 am

    Please invest resources on X and Wayland.

  183. Qt inside | Nicolas Schirrer says: (permalink)
    February 20th, 2011 at 1:01 pm

    [...] Shuttleworth l’a annoncé sur son blog hier, la future version Ubuntu 11.10 inculera Qt par défaut, le framework propriété de Nokia à la [...]