#13: “Pretty” is a feature

Wednesday, October 25th, 2006

If we want the world to embrace free software, we have to make it beautiful. I’m not talking about inner beauty, not elegance, not ideological purity… pure, unadulterated, raw, visceral, lustful, shallow, skin deep beauty.

We have to make it gorgeous. We have to make it easy on the eye. We have to make it take your friend’s breath away.

That’s why I’m thrilled with the work of some of our community artists. Check out this logo from Who (ignore the scaling, view it directly):

Who's Ubuntu Logo

If you are of an artistic bent then I would urge you to get involved with the Ubuntu Art Team, and peruse or join the Ubuntu Art mailing list. There is also a new site for community-contributed artwork, being developed by Brandon Holtsclaw and I think currently available at art-staging.ubuntu.com though it will move to art.ubuntu.com and get more horsepower shortly.

Of course, “pretty but unusable” won’t work either. It needs to be both functional and attractive. Rather than bling for bling’s sake, let’s use artistic effects to make the desktop BETTER, and obviously better.

This is a challenge we (the free software community) share with scientists too.

I had a great coincidental chat with a guy from Imperial College, London, recently. He lectures in a course which teaches scientists and engineers how to communicate with the rest of humanity. This is close to my heart – I love the bleeding edge, physics, computer science etc, and I can’t stop my imagination from turning ideas into exotic works of mental art. But mental art isn’t something you can convey very easily – it’s in your head, after all. If we want people to get excited about science we have to show them what it’s makes possible. Imperial College teaches people who love science how to make it fascinating for everyone else too – something NASA could take to heart.

Similarly, I met up with Susan Greenfield from the Royal Institution – not a loony bin for inbred monarchs, but a public forum for the demonstration, discussion and discourse on science that goes back to the days of Humphrey Davy and Michael Faraday. In those days, science was hot entertainment for the gentrified classes, who would gather of an evening in formal dress to listen to scientists talk about the magical world that was opening up under their microscopes and instruments. We spoke about a number of things but I thought that their mandate was most similar to that of the Hip2BeSquare project which I fund in South Africa, which brands the idea of being “smart with your life” for students and pupils in SA (think about it – which pays off more in your life, an extra hour of math or an extra hour on the football field… it takes a lot of math before the marginal benefits line up and it’s time to hit the fields).

All of which goes to say that messaging is important – learning how to “show off your best stuff” is an essential skill, and I hope the free software community will take that to heart.

196 Responses to “#13: “Pretty” is a feature”

  1. Freddy Martinez Says:

    I also agree with another user’s comment that the biggest thing should be making sure the average user can get their system working with no problem. There is no way to set up PPPoE without command line (my system wouldn’t let me use the graphical set up because it wasn’t accepting my sudo pw). This is a problem because as the user a few comments above me stated, lots of things don’t work out of the box. I’ve helped people on IRC that need help with their all in one printer, but then their scanner doesn’t work. I can’t have multiply programs using sound (I know their is a work around, but their SHOULDN’T be a work around). The important thing should be having a Ubuntu box that will take a user with many different variables and their system should be set to work. I understand the current split with F/OSS vs propriety issues, not all the hardware vendors make it possible to have drivers (Fatality sound card comes to mind) however it is a shame that the community can’t just hack up a driver.

    Let me say the current Ubuntu default desktop is ugly. It is my opinion that brown/orange is an awful combination. I would rather look at the Kubuntu desktop because it doesn’t hurt my eyes to look at it. Look at Kubuntu Edgy, they took a step that involved Blue and Purple, it was controversial, (I enjoyed it) but it broke from KDE blue blue blue blue blue model, making Kubuntu much more distinct.

    I believe *nix is about choice. From what I understand FC6 brought people back to their distro by including desktop effects into their default installed. I played around with XGL/Compiz but decided I didn’t like it. Compiz has a memory leak and slowed down my computer. In hindsight. I was more productive without it. I think maybe for 7.04, we should bundle Beryl/AIGLX or something along those lines, but have an option that says, “Here is what beryl is all about, install it?” and have a beryl walkthrough. Alternatively, we would need a one-click Beryl uninstalled for users unhappy with desktops effects.

  2. mikee Says:

    i would agree, pretty AND stable should do it.

  3. WolfmanZ Says:

    It’s obvious that Mark, among others, just doesn’t get it. Eye candy is not what the world needs to make Linux a viable OS replacement on the corporate or home desktops. KDE and/or Gnome do a fine enough job for most users (of course power users like to tweak).

    What Linux needs to be successful is better / more fool-proof installation shells for applications! I consider myself very technically inclined (24 years experience with computer hardware/software – work in the industry – my first computer ran DOS 3.2 – pre-windows, etc.) I’ve played around with many different Linux distro’s (Ubunto, OpenSuse, RedHat, Knoppix, Debian, OpenBSD, Slackware, etc). The one problem I’ve run into on every one is getting the various applications I need installed.

    Regardless of how well the company making the dristo does in implementing their “packaging” software, I always end up needing to research dependancies, permissions, and/or text-based configurations on my own. The dependancies are the worst! This application depends on that library which isn’t included. That library depends on another. That library has some archane configuration file that about 68% fully documented, etc.

    No non-technical corporate or home users are going to be able to go through all that. It’s frustrating enough for us geeks!

    Windows on the other hand has the rare odd case that requires a VB runtime or the .net framework installed. Other than that, 99.99% of the applications out there install/run right out of the box (download).

    (I assume this is true for Macs as well – I don’t get my Macbook until spring!)

    So until the Linux application developers and homebrew coders out there can their stuff to install AND configure easily through a simple GUI, Linux will never succeed in the mainstream marketplace.

    (Doing my best Earl Pitts impersonation)
    WAKE UP AMERICA!
    WolfmanZ Out!

    PS. Currently dual booting Ubuntu and OpenSuse 10 – both with Compix – now that’s eye candy!

  4. Dave Jenkins - Salt Lake - Washington - London - Stuttgart - Tokyo - Seoul » Network World Says:

    […] You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site. Leave aReply […]

  5. digital end » Blog Archive » Make Linux pretty? Says:

    […] Mark Shuttleworth, the founder of the Ubuntu project reckons that Linux and (specifically) ubuntu should be made prettier. I have to agree! […]

  6. Steve Says:

    How about making it work? I’ve used linux on and off for a few years. The reason I go back to Windows and MacOS….dependency hell and software install issues (ex. trying to get mpalyer installed properly). Linux has to do everything Mac and Win does and do it easy or non-tech folks will never go for it. Why I should ahve to download all kinds of additional files just to get mpg playback is just plain stupid. Eye candy is nice, but functionality is king.

  7. lyceum Says:

    If you really want to shake things up, forget the color wars. Mac went white, Microsoft went Black. They both look good and they skipped color. We should do one better. Make our color “clear”. Not compleatly clear, but see through. Even better, set it up to change the clock, etc lighter or darker as needed per the back ground. Do that, and you will change the world. Everyone has a fav color, and you will never make everyone happy. With clear, focus can be on the icons and the background. Both need attention.

  8. Andy Says:

    Glad to hear that the boss thinks things need brightening up :)

    Having installed hundreds of Ubuntu / Kubuntu systems for peoples of all ages, the first comment I get is:

    Ubuntu – looks kinda dark and dull, how can I brighten up everything?

    Kubuntu – ahh, this looks better… its what I’m used to 😀

    Maybe just a basic “enlightening” of the desktop would be a major first step :)

    Andy

  9. Luke.ZA Says:

    I am no expert, but would it be impossible to impliment web-like rollover icons / transitional icons for the desktop, let’s say on mouseover… instead of just highlighting and the common sort? Leaving murky trails when dragging icons around etc. Colours are incredibly important; not really if it’s brown or blue or white, but the overall feel the scheme gives the user. Maybe I’m way behind/ahead (of) myself here, or if considering implimentation of some of these features would be too high a load on memory/cpu? Oh well, just a thought! Miserable humidity in Durban can cloud one’s mind! You’re electric?

  10. Jared Martin Says:

    Compiz/Beryl is definitely the future of linux. Ubuntu should be the first ones there. I feel that i blows the graphics of both Vista and Mac away. And I’ve also found many people willing to switch to linux for that reason.

    Also, the Brown was fine, but it’s getting old. Why not a dark green (also natural yet Alive) or an nice Orange more similar to the Brown you like so much.

  11. gNewSense: Finally, a modern GNU+Linux Distribution that is 100% Free Software at Understanding Says:

    […] I have experienced practical benefits of Ubuntu over Debian. Firstly in terms of hardware detection, as I tried to install Debian on my computer in July 2006 and it failed to detect my SATA harddisks and would not install, while Ubuntu installed perfectly. And secondly in terms of prettyness; as Mark Shuttleworth is fond of saying, “Pretty Is A Feature”. […]

  12. Max Says:

    XGL+Compiz/Beryl on CD 1! Make it an option at install time.

    It is For The Win. I know a guy who didn’t have a good word to say about linux three months ago (he even went so far as to install a Windows background on his account at UCT’s Mark Shuttleworth Lab) but since he saw the Beryl video… he boots ubuntu just to swish his windows around. Soon he’ll actually be using it for something.

  13. Johnny Chadda » Stunning Linux desktop effects steal the spotlight from competitors Says:

    […] I recently posted a notice called Artwork is a feature, which points to a recent post by Mark Shuttleworth where he discusses the importance of having beautiful artwork to appeal to a broad audience. He says: “We have to make it gorgeous. We have to make it easy on the eye. We have to make it take your friend’s breath away.” […]

  14. Sayash Says:

    seriously, think beyond XGL, which alienates old hardware.
    have you tried e17?
    the devs say it’s pre alpha. it’s still more stable than anything i’ve used.
    need i say anything about it’s looks.

  15. Shane Says:

    I’ve noticed that developers look down on artists. In fact many developers seem to think because they can compile or install the Gimp, they are automatically qualified as designers. Much of the popular design on places like kde/gnome-look.org are copies and ports of skins from Windows and Mac. I’ve seen linux users wonder why more artists and designers don’t get involved in linux. It’s simple, they aren’t welcomed.

    By the way, the new installer in Edgy is terrible. This is the worse Ubuntu release ever.

  16. Adrian Says:

    GIVE BACK PRIVATE SPACE – An operating system is no different from a garden. We cast our eyes over the OS space thousands of times per day, should that space belong to us or Ubuntu?
    Be the first OS to remove the branding from the menu bar and see how the world recieves the gesture. (Don’t worry we still have to stare at it during boot up).

    COLLABORATIVE CUSTOMISATION FRAMEWORK – XGL is cool, but its still a bit of an abstraction if you ask me. A display panel is not 3D.
    Windows could fade and decay in a far more organic way if you ran some sort of cellular automata process over them. But I dont know how to do that so I’m going to shut up,

  17. Fixx Software, Inc. » Blog Archive » SUSE Linux 10 vs. Ubuntu Edgy 6.10 Says:

    […] Ubuntu Edgy: Mark Shuttleworth made a posting in his blog recently that “Pretty” is a feature. Well they are still off the mark with this release on that count. For all the changes and growth that Ubuntu has made in the short amount of time that it has been around, the looks just have not kept up with the rest of the changes. The color scheme is starting to get dated, and the graphics have not changed much. After spending some time on the GNOME art site things started to look much better. The default install includes an excellent selection of software for a distribution that comes on one CD. The time between Edgy and Dapper was rather short so as one would expect there are no major changes. Most of the packages are simple updated from the previous release. There where really only two big changes that I have found. Edgy is now using a generic kernel that replaces the K7 and i686 kernel from past distributions. The other change is with Nautilus, it is not nearly as stable as in past releases. Edgy uses apt for its package management, and after making a few changes to the source list there is pretty much nothing that can not be install quick and easy. […]

  18. Masuran.org » Blog Archive » What Feisty Fawn needs Says:

    […] Desktop effects This was a predictable item on the list. To quote Mark shuttleworth: “Pretty is a feature”. Not only is it just pretty, some desktop effects actually improve usability and make a better user experience. One of them is the Desktop Cube. It does not only look very cool, it also makes the concept of workspaces much easier to understand. […]

  19. Hebert Caballero Says:

    I just imagined a TV commercial. One Big Man tryed to defeat an Old Man. This Old Man reveals himself as a powerfuld fully trained Aikido or KungFu Master. In only one elegant and fast movement ghe take the Big Man hand and trow it to the ground with ease. Off course we need years and experience to finetune our abilities, but this is the reason for call Kung Fu or Aikido an Art. The Old Man just shows perfection is not a big show of energy-waste, its just to use elegant and efficiently what we have to get what we want… Like Linux. Beauty is behind our work and efforts. Bacause putting our life in this goal is an Art too. I want to make this idea free to use only and only if used to promote the use of Free Software, Linux or Ubuntum, and disallowing it to be used for Privative Software promotion.

  20. cor de cocô at Caveat Emptor Says:

    […] Mas acho que tem alguém que discorda: Mark Shuttleworth, o homem por trás da distribuição Linux de maior sucesso da atualidade. Segundo ele, beleza é importante para um produto. E como nada acontece com o Ubuntu sem seu aval, só podemos imaginar que a insistência naquela horrenda interface marrom se deve à crença de que a cor é bonita, e é o que os usuários querem. […]

  21. Scott Says:

    FONTS!

    Talk about putting the cart before the horse. All the eye candy in the world is irrelevant if the fonts are fuzzy. Yeah, Beryl and stuff is nice for the marketing effect, but people read web pages and documents more than they play with rotating cubes and wobbly windows. They may come for the eye candy, but they won’t stay.

    If you go over to the Ubuntu forums there’s an endless thread on different patches and kludges to improve font rendering. None of them really work. It makes by head hurt messing with that stuff.
    If fonts look great on the desktop, they look wrong in Firefox and OpenOffice, and so on.
    At this point it’s 85% there, but just not good enough.

  22. ark Says:

    Ubuntu colors can be slightly modified to look prettier without making any too-radical changes. Ubuntu could adopt the colors from this photo: http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id=323872200&size=o

  23. q!Bang Solutions » Blog Archive » Andrew Tanenbaum on Building Reliable Systems Says:

    […] What I see more in software development in general, is no longer performance improvements or meaningful features, I see a lot of eye candies being added. Some people may argue that pretty is a feature, but is this all we can come up with? What good is eye candy if the system can’t even run reliably? I recall being told once that hardware and network speed is so fast now that we can “code sloppy”. I have to disagree. Anyone who’s done the basic computer science algorithm study can tell you that a bad algorithm can really suck up your resources, and depending on the operating system you are running, it may even crash your computer. […]

  24. q!Bang Solutions Blog » Andrew Tanenbaum on Building Reliable Systems Says:

    […] What I see more in software development in general, is no longer performance improvements or meaningful features, I see a lot of eye candies being added. Some people may argue that pretty is a feature, but is this all we can come up with? What good is eye candy if the system can’t even run reliably? I recall being told once that hardware and network speed is so fast now that we can “code sloppy”. I have to disagree. Anyone who’s done the basic computer science algorithm study can tell you that a bad algorithm can really suck up your resources, and depending on the operating system you are running, it may even crash your computer. […]

  25. Intel® Software Network Blogs » Blog Archive » Software must be beautiful Says:

    […] Ubuntu’s Mark Shuttleworth posted an entry to his blog in which he states that software needs to be beautiful and functional in order to be really successful, to be embraced by the world. […]

  26. Shuttleworth from Ubuntu Gives Talk at CERN at JStorage Says:

    […] #13 Pretty is a feature #12 Consistent Packaging #11 Simplified, rationalised licensing #10 Presence #9 Pervasive support #8 Govoritye po Russki? #007 Great gadgets #6 Sensory Immersion #5 Real real-time collaboration #4 Plan, execute, DELIVER #3 The Extra dimension #2 Granny’s new camera #1 Keeping it FREE […]

  27. Robert Says:

    Pretty is nice. Working hardware is much more important. I switched to Ubuntu a few weeks ago, and I love the many parts of it that work. I am thankful for all the generous labor that has been done to enable users to have free software. Free, and in many cases beautiful. But software, regardless of free or beautiful, is of no use if it doesn’t work with printers, scanners, and the like. Emphasis on the *no* in no use.

    My scanner is a paperweight under Linux. My printer seemed to be destined for that fate. It was rescued (or rather I was rescued) when I managed to shoehorn in a driver from another manufacturer to make it work. Sort of.

    I do not want to appear ungrateful. But Ubuntu, and Linux generally, can be taken seriously only when they enable hardware to work.

  28. Hakim Says:

    I have been using ubuntu for a couple of years now (alongside windows and osx). And I was glad when I first read this post. I must say I have been constantly disappointed ever since.

    Pretty is a feature – I totally agree…..BUT it’s very far from done with logo’s, icons and wallpapers… And in my humble opinion we could successfully leave this to the great ubuntu community.

    If the OS is to be pretty to things are essential:

    FONTS!

    THEME – I’m talking about window corners and such – I simply don’t understand why Gnome has to be so ugly, it looks like a 1996 webpage.

    These are the things that make an OS pretty!!

    I believe very much in Ubuntu, but we have to and can look as good as mac – get that focus and user will be flocking….

    I hope you read this post…

    sincerely Hakim

  29. GiorgosK Says:

    Creating something nice is not that hard but, making something extremelly beautiful is art and it takes time
    ( like anything else in this world I guess )

  30. The Opinions of a Loud Mouth Man :: Get your hands dirty. Says:

    […] It is tempting to configure this machine further since it can access the Internet but I feel this would be unfair  for an “out of the box” demonstration of what  is on offer in Ubuntus latest release .  So it comes as a relief that the Home Directory of my initial configuration comes with a series of example Video, Audio, Graphic and Documents which I can use as part of my presentation. What I hope to gain from this presentation is an on going awareness that the choice available to users , Home or Business, do not require complete hardware upgrades  to benefit from interesting and “pretty” operating systems and applications. I hope the winner of this pre-installed PC will take time to experiment and examine the potential that Ubuntu Desktop offers to any user.  I will be providing an additional 2 hour orientation course to help the user “get ubuntu” and blogging more about their experiences and opinions.  Whilst I am no developer or bug catcher or ticket clicker I would like to use this opportunity to thank the Ubuntu team for this incredible “product”   and my appreciation for the continued quality and production value shown within. This year I am looking forward  to installing more Ubuntu Desktops and keeping those Ubuntu users coming back for more. […]

  31. Ubuntu | Nik Butler: Get your hands dirty. Says:

    […] It is tempting to configure this machine further since it can access the Internet but I feel this would be unfair  for an “out of the box” demonstration of what  is on offer in Ubuntus latest release .  So it comes as a relief that the Home Directory of my initial configuration comes with a series of example Video, Audio, Graphic and Documents which I can use as part of my presentation. What I hope to gain from this presentation is an on going awareness that the choice available to users , Home or Business, do not require complete hardware upgrades  to benefit from interesting and “pretty” operating systems and applications. I hope the winner of this pre-installed PC will take time to experiment and examine the potential that Ubuntu Desktop offers to any user.  I will be providing an additional 2 hour orientation course to help the user “get ubuntu” and blogging more about their experiences and opinions.  Whilst I am no developer or bug catcher or ticket clicker I would like to use this opportunity to thank the Ubuntu team for this incredible “product”   and my appreciation for the continued quality and production value shown within. This year I am looking forward  to installing more Ubuntu Desktops and keeping those Ubuntu users coming back for more. […]

  32. Dell , linux e o Brasil « Random Dumplings of Wisdom Says:

    […] Talvez a proxima revolucao venha na facilidade de uso, melhorando a interacao usuario-computador, ja que cedo ou tarde o usuario ainda precisa encarar a linha de comando para realizar operacoes sem o mouse. Isso nao eh algo necessariamente ruim, mas muitos precisam usar o computador como solucao, e nao como desafio, na solucao de problemas diarios (nessa linha de raciocinio, usuarios da Apple sabem como o aspecto “cosmetico” eh importante). Essa revolucao esta nos planos do guru da distribuicao Ubuntu, Mark Shuttleworth.   […]

  33. baby Says:

    To be honest, I haven’t been totally captivated by the artwork in Ubuntu yet. Now, I love the logo which you chose (the one above) but the colouring of the interface (the default one – which I know is going for an Africa theme… but nevetheless) isn’t really wonderful enough. It’s a little bland. Being South African, I’m all for an African theme, but it could have been a little more colourful than that.

    The pic of the tree for the desktop is pretty cool… but, I’m sure that in general the interface could have looked better.

    Or operated a little better. I’m still a little disappointed with Ubuntu being a fairly average user of an Operating System. I actually desperately want to change from Windows, but Ubuntu just hasn’t captured me as much as I’d like.

    Hope there is more to come, nonetheless, and encourage you to keep going!!

  34. Firefox Extensions « Experiencing E-Learning Says:

    […] (do you really care?). There’s also some visual changes available through themes. “Pretty is a feature” […]

  35. Ubuntu 7.10 X Windows Vista雙重開機 « Chin7’s Weblog Says:

    […] Ubuntu的中心理念是「以人道待人」,每次改版也都明顯感覺它變的越來越簡單,安裝則是不能再更無腦了。在前一版Ubuntu 7.04首度加入封閉原始碼驅動程式的安裝選項,曾引起不小的爭議,因為一般Linux基於道德因素不會有這種特色,但Ubuntu為了讓漂亮的3D桌面更容易啟動,在操作簡易與道德之間做了很好的平衡,Mark甚至直接承認作業系統的「華麗度」對一般人非常重要(“Pretty” is a feature)。對於有道德潔癖的龜毛人,Ubuntu也推出「聖人級道德標準」的特殊版本Gobuntu,這種單純為各種使用者著想的態度讓我很欣賞。 […]

  36. Mysterious eyes » Blog Archive » 3D桌面的安装和设置 Says:

    […] Ubuntu的中心理念是「以人道待人」,每次改版也都明顯感覺它變的越來越簡單,安裝則是不能再更無腦了。在前一版Ubuntu 7.04首度加入封閉原始碼驅動程式的安裝選項,曾引起不小的爭議,因為一般Linux基於道德因素不會有這種特色,但Ubuntu為了讓漂亮的3D桌面更容易啟動,在操作簡易與道德之間做了很好的平衡,Mark甚至直接承認作業系統的「華麗度」對一般人非常重要(“Pretty” is a feature)。對於有道德潔癖的龜毛人,Ubuntu也推出「聖人級道德標準」的特殊版本Gobuntu,這種單純為各種使用者著想的態度讓我很欣賞。 […]

  37. I Wanna Migrate to *nix Says:

    Hi Mark,

    I am a fellow South African, I stand behind the free movement 100%.

    One thing that concerns me about the free movement is that there is no standard!!!

    EG: Ubuntu vs Fedora

    Installation proceedure differs when using GUI (One uses yast the other adept)

    When *nix systems become standard out of box, with a simlar feel, with easy usability it will become popular, only after usability has been address start looking at visuals.

    Compatability between M$ products needs to be a standard, it should not be up to the end user to install wine etc. to get M$ products to work, or better yet have products very similar to the mainstream titles like Photoshop and Dreamweaver.

    Your average M$ computer user is someone that does not understand what goes on behind the curtains of window$, so for someone like this to migrate, it is very difficult.

    Without ease of use *nix systems will never (I say never, but proove me wrong pleeaaasssee) become main stream.

    The fist things that need to be looked at:

    1. Ease of use (for someone that has never used a PC before)
    2. Point and click installations with GUI setups (NETWORING GUI–>PPPOE)
    3. Central Storage for installed apps (eg: M$ Program Files) I know *nix mostly used /etc/ or /usr or /var
    4. Compatability (Wine just has not got it 100% yet)
    5. Visualls with smooth fonts.
    6. Easy Driver Installations (When necessary)
    7. Media support (Easy to install or out of box support)
    8. Hardware Compatability (almost there already)
    9. Easy customisation through GUI

    One thing is for sure *nix systems will not get avarage M$ users to switch untill the first 5 are up to standard. When the first 5 are up to standard *nix systems will rival any M$ based system for ease of use, and production. As my productivity is reduced on *nix due to having to use console to change files access restricted files, change system settings, install apps that don’t have installers etc etc.

    But overall once *nix system is setup and running stability is second to none.

    But again the average M$ computer user is installing and removing software on a daily/weekly/monthly basis, which again will reduce productivity if it were on *nix system.

    These are my observations and views, and I strongly feel that *nix has potential to be the greatest OS’s, but this can only happen if *nix community starts to standardise, and hopefully produce a product that will be able to end M$ reign as most used OS.

  38. Diigo or Delicious for Beginners? « Experiencing E-Learning Says:

    […] prettier than delicious, and “pretty is a feature.” In some respects, I feel like the more attractive interface might actually be less […]

  39. The future of Ubuntu Art | MetaFilter Says:

    […] for the darling of the open source world? Now entering a new 2-year art developent cycle, Ubuntu’s continuing quest for "pure, unadulterated, raw, visceral, lustful, shallow, skin deep beauty" has begun […]

  40. Pretty is a feature, but ugly is subjective « Motho ke motho ka botho Says:

    […] I know: Pretty is a feature. Every time somebody gripes — and yes, I’m using the word “gripe” […]

  41. SomGNU » Blog Archive » Un parell d’apunts sobre Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex Says:

    […] En fi, hi ha moltes més novetats, però això caldrà revisar-ho més endavant, quan ja estiguem a prop de la versió final. Com podeu comprovar, s’han quedat amb el tema Human taronja de sempre. Ja vore si finalment el canvien d’una vegada i compleixen allò de “ser més macos que el MacOSX“. […]

  42. Why do people hate me for using a Mac... - Page 8 - Mac-Forums.com Says:

    […] a selling point (think about the recognition Macs get for looking the way they do). If you believe Mark Shuttleworth, "pretty" is a feature. There are some useful features of Aero that I would like to see […]

  43. Cnet: Ubuntu is as slick as OS X and Windows. Me: Bullshit « Ubuntu Syndrome Says:

    […] Mark Shuttleworth wants to make Linux beautiful, he’s going to have to fix some of the basic stuff first.  Worrying about whether some […]

  44. El que vindrà amb Karmic Koala | SomGNU Says:

    […] recordar aquell objectiu que en Shuttleworth també va comentar: fer d’Ubuntu un sistema operatiu més atractiu estèticament que el mateix MacOSX. Caldrà veure si amb Karmic Koala ens tornarem a quedar decebuts o no respecte a aquest tema. […]

  45. Solid Block of Ise » Blog Archive » Ubuntu Needs Pretty Icons Says:

    […] while actually, October 2006) Mark Shuttleworth posted an article on his blog claiming that “pretty is a feature” and that Ubuntu needed to put priority on not only functioning well, but also looking good […]

  46. Ubuntu 9.10 – Karmic Koala Reviewed « Sean Jordan—web developer Says:

    […] ago, Mark Shuttleworth proclaimed that ["Pretty" is a feature].  Understanding the trend of the “wow” effect to impress users, Ubuntu comes […]