Dash takes shape for 11.10 Unity

Tuesday, August 16th, 2011

Our goal with Unity is unprecedented ease of use, visual style and performance on the Linux desktop. With feature freeze behind us, we have a refined target render of the Dash for Oneiric, and here it is:

click for the full size render.

Scopes and Lenses

We’ve moved from the idea of “Places” to a richer set of “Scopes and Lenses”. Scopes are data sources, and can tap into any online or offline data set as long as they can generate categorised results for a search, describe a set of filters and support some standard interfaces. Lenses are various ways to present the data that come from Scopes.

The Scopes have a range of filtering options they can use, such as ratings (“show me all the 5 star apps in the Software Center please”) and categories (“… that are games or media related”). Over time, the sophistication of this search system will grow but the goal is to keep it visual and immediate – something anyone can drive at first attempt.

This delivers on the original goal of creating a device-like experience that was search driven. Collaboration with the always-excellent Zeitgeist crew (quite a few of whom are now full time on the Unity team!) has improved the search experience substantially, kudos to them for the awesome work they’ve put in over the past six months. Since we introduced the Dash as a full screen device-like search experience, the same idea has made its way into several other shells, most notably Mac OS X Lion. While we’re definitely the outsider in this contest, I think we can stay one step ahead in the game given the support of our community.

The existing Places are all in the process of being updated to the Scopes and Lenses model, it’s a bit of a construction site at the moment so hard-hats are advised but dive in if you have good ideas for some more interesting scopes. I’ve heard all sorts of rumours about cool scopes in the pipeline ;-) and I bet this will be fertile ground for innovation. It’s pretty straightforward to make a scope, I’m sure others will blog and document the precise mechanisms but for those who want a head start, just use the source, Luke.

Panel evolution

In the panel, you’ll see that the top left corner is now consistently used to close whatever has the focus. Maximising a window keeps the window controls in the same position relative to the window – the top left corner. We have time to refine the behaviour of this based on user testing of the betas; for example, in one view, one should be able to close successive windows from that top left corner even if they are not maximised.

It’s taken several releases of careful iteration to get to this point. Even though we had a good idea where we were headed, each step needed to be taken one release at a time. Perhaps this might make a little clearer the reasons for the move of window controls to the left – it was the only place where we could ultimately keep them consistent all the way up to a maximised window with the title bar integrated into the panel. I’m confident this part will all be settled by 12.04.

As part of this two-step shuffle, the Dash invocation is now integrated in the Launcher. While this is slightly less of a Fitts-fantastic location, we consider it appropriate for a number of reasons. First, it preserves the top left corner for closing windows. Second, the Dash is best invoked with the Super key (sometimes erroneously and anachronistically referred to as the “Windows” key, for some reason ;-)). And finally, observations during user testing showed people as more inclined to try clicking on items in the Launcher than on the top left icon in the panel, unless that icon was something explicit like a close button for the window. Evidence based design rules.

Visual refinements

Rather than a flat darkening, we’re introducing a wash based on the desktop colour. The dash thus adjusts to your preferred palette based on your wallpaper. The same principle will drive some of the login experience – choosing a user will shift the login screen towards that users wallpaper and palette.

We’ve also integrated the panel and the dash, so indicators are rendered in a more holographic fashion inside the dash. Together with efforts to mute the contrast of Launcher icons the result is a more striking dash altogether: content is presented more dramatically.

Since we have raw access to the GL pipeline, we’re taking advantage of that with some real-time blur effects to help the readability and presentation of overlay content in the Dash, too. Both Nux in the case of Unity-3D and Qt in the case of Unity-2D have rich GL capabilities, and we’d like to make the most of whatever graphics stack you have on your hardware, while still running smoothly on the low end.

Growing community and ecosystem

A project like this needs diverse perspectives, talents and interests to make it feel rounded and complete. While Canonical is carrying the core load, and we’re happy to do so in order to bring this level of quality to the Ubuntu desktop user experience, what makes me particularly optimistic is the energy of the contributors both to Unity directly and to the integration of many other components and applications with the platform.

On the contribution front, a key goal for the Unity community is to maintain velocity in contributor patch flows. You should expect a rapid review and, all being well, landing, for contributions to Unity that are in line with the design goals. In a few cases we’ve also accepted patches that make it possible to use Unity in ways that are different to the design goals, especially where the evidence doesn’t lean very heavily one way or the other. Such contributions add some complexity but also give us the opportunity to test alternatives in a very rich way; the winning alternative would certainly survive, the other might not.

Contrary to common prognostication, this community is shaping up to be happy and productive. For those who do so for love and personal interest, participating in such a community should be fun and stimulating, an opportunity to exercise skills or pursue interests, give something back that will be appreciated and enjoyed by many, and help raise the bar for Linux experiences. I’d credit Jorge and others for their stewardship of this so far, and my heartfelt thanks to all of those who have helped make Unity better just for the fun of it.

Outside of the core, the growing number of apps that integrate sweetly with the launcher (quicklists), dash (scopes), indicators (both app-specific and category indicators) is helping to ensure that API’s are useful, refined and well implemented, as well as improving the experience of Ubuntu users everywhere. Now that we’re moving to Unity by default for both 2D and 3D, that’s even more valuable.

Under the hood

In this round, Unity-3D and Unity-2D have grown together and become twin faces on the same underlying model. They now share a good deal of common code and common services and – sigh – common bugs :-). But we’re now at the point where we can be confident that the Unity experience is available on the full range of hardware, from lightweight thin client systems made of ARM or Atom CPU’s to CADstations with oodles of GPU horsepower.

There’s something of a competition under way between proponents of the QML based Unity-2D, who believe that the GL support here is good enough to compete both at the high end and on the low end, and the GL-heads in Unity-3D, who think that the enhanced experiences possible with raw GL access justify the additional complexity of working in C++ and GL on the metal. Time will tell! Since a lot of the design inspiration for Unity came from game interfaces, I lean to the “let’s harness all the GL we can for the full 3D experience” side of the spectrum, but I’m intrigued with what the QML team are doing.

318 comments:

  1. Greg says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 8:46 pm

    Thanks for this post Mark, you’ve made me a lot more enthusiastic that there’s some cool changes coming for 11.10

    I was a bit worried that we were iterating a bit too slowly and after the wonderful 11.04 we weren’t going to see much changing. Looks like I was wrong.

  2. IGnatius T Foobar says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 9:00 pm

    Come on Mark, it’s a nice effort but some of us want the traditional panel-driven desktop; we want our computers to act like computers, not like smartphones. Please, please, PLEASE give us a permanent and non-deprecated option to operate with a “classic” (GNOME 2 style) desktop.

  3. Chris says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 9:11 pm

    @IGnatios T Foobar: use XFCE, LXDE

    @Article: Why don’t you use the whole screen like Gnome3 does? Unity will not properly work on screens which are smaller than about 800×600 px and will not use the whole screen size when it’s larger than 800x600px.

  4. Fitoschido says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 9:18 pm

    Please restore the BFB in the panel, mekes more sense than a Launcher. Without it, one cannot show the launcher by hovering the mouse in top left of screen anymore, and that is a loss of functionality and a regression.

    https://bugs.launchpad.net/unity/+bug/825146

  5. zekopeko says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 9:22 pm

    Mark what is going to happen with the global menu? Are you going to finally have it visible at all times? Have you done some research on that?

    And since I’m ranting, rounded corners on menus. Pretty please?

  6. novatillasku.com » Blog Archive » Cuentas de usuario en Oneiric Ocelot says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 9:23 pm

    [...] os perdáis el articulo que acaba de escribir Mark Shuttleworth en su blog.Se siente orgulloso, se nota Comparte y [...]

  7. Jannis Pohlmann says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 9:25 pm

    Despite being the developer of a classic desktop (Xfce), I’ve often recommended the Ubuntu netbook remix and Unity to people using netbooks in the past. This probably won’t change anytime soon… but to be honest, Mark, this interface looks really chaotic (the username in the upper right corner kinda supports that impression ;)) and busy. So here’s my feedback (note that Unity made a refreshing impression on me last time I checked, despite not being my own cup of tea):

    Is the border around “Internet” supposed to indicate an input field where the user can type text? It almost looks like one of the lense/source buttons on the right. I there is at least a blinking cursor present to encourage users to start typing?

    Are those triangles next to “Refine search”, “Lenses” and “Sources” representing a collapse/expand feature or a the presence of a drop down menu? If the first, why allow lenses and sources to be collapsed/expanded at all (in particular as they don’t seem to free up space for the content at the left)?

    What do the buttons at the bottom (house, pencils, document etc.) represnt? If they are used to switch between different types of content, why not add a “Content” section at the right, below “Sources”?

    Is the thin white part at the right supposed to be a scrollbar handle? I know you guys are experimenting with scrollbars that take up less space if not used but this one looks completely disconnected from the actual content of the view.

    Ok, one last thing: the blurry background is nice but IMHO too much detail still gets through and makes the entire thing look very busy. The “See X more results” texts are barely distinguishable from the background noise.

    I hope any of this is useful. I also hope that nobody gets my comments wrong; I really appreciate that you folks experiment with new ideas (the everlasting GNOME vs Unity story put aside here, into which I’m not personally involved anyway ;)).

    – Jannis

  8. Coppertop says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 9:29 pm

    Will it be possible to disable that pointless transparency on the Dash? I certainly hope so. I also second zekopeko’s question — could the global menu be always visible? Please, it took that much time to finally get to the (obvious, dare I say) conclusion that “window buttons should always be there”, could we please get this one right as well while we’re at it?

  9. Jo-Erlend Schinstad says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 9:31 pm

    Gnatius: Gnome2 is dead. It’s been deprecated by upstream. There is a Gnome-panel3 shell, but it’s not identical to gnome-panel. If you want a concervative shell that resembles gnome2, then I would whole-heartedly recommend trying Xubuntu, which is exactly that. (Xfce4-panel with xfapplet-plugin can use gnome-panel applets too).

    Mark: This is looking great. I actually had to open my natty dash and it felt sort of old after having looked at your screenshot. One question though. At the end, you’re talking about Unity and Unity2D coming closer together.. What about lenses, will I be able to write a lense once and use it in both shells as with the other infrastructure, like notifiers, indicators, etc?

    I’ve noticed people asking for similar stuff for Lxde and other environments. Is that part of the plan, to make scope presentations available on other desktop environments as well?

    That is to say; how coupled are these things?

  10. El Dash de Unity 3D toma forma de cara a Ubuntu 11.10 « Soft-Libre says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 9:38 pm

    [...] Artículo original [Eng] Rate this: Compartir:MásCorreo electrónicoImprimirDiggIdenti.caMeneameLike this:LikeBe the first to like this post. [...]

  11. darkhole says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 9:45 pm

    Hey Mark! I like the rounded icons, but according to the screenshot, there are two shapes, one classic and one similar to the new icons in Meego 1.2 from Nokia. Which one is the final design to be adopted?

    BTW, what browser is that?? Firefox 2.0 or older !?? :)

  12. iheartubuntu.com says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 10:05 pm

    The visual style for Oneiric as shown above is second to none. I usually describe women as “gorgeous” which this definitely is! But I have to be forthright in my thoughts here. Is this going to be usable for both the common user and for businesses alike? You would not believe the requests of friends and family who have asked me to re-install Ubuntu back to 10.10 for them from Natty.

  13. Bobby Junket says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 10:20 pm

    Is it really a good idea to have a scene-tagged downloaded movie in the image?

  14. Zap says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 10:24 pm

    The render looks very good!! The only thing I don’t really like are those window controls at the top-left. If they’re going to be there all the time, they need different appearance, and more importantly some kind of visual answer to “why do I have window controls on the panel? Do they switch off my computer? Do they close the Dash?” ;)

    My best wishes and thanks to all the people who are going to put their efforts on Unity (and Compiz….!!) from now till the release!!

  15. Knef says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 10:32 pm

    So, whenever I click on the Ubuntu button, the panel is going to change and go from dark gray to transparent? I agree that the final result looks great, but isn’t such an abrupt change a little bewildering?

  16. M says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 10:33 pm

    That new look/ui (unity?) feels horrible.
    How can anyone get excited by that cluttered look in the screenshot?

  17. Jim Raredon says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 10:54 pm

    Mark, this truly looks amazing! I agree with everything Jo-Erlend says; my Natty laptop looks archaic by comparison.

    My take on Global Menu: keep it the way it is. It’s much cleaner not to have File, Edit… on the screen at all times (that’s something that always annoyed me when being forced to use a Mac). While it may not be obvious to new users, it can easily be covered in an Intro Tutorial or something similar.

    This brings me too my next suggestion: an Introduction/Tutorial Video after a user’s initial login. While most of the GUI is very intuitive, it may be a difficult transition for a user coming from a bloated proprietary environment. A video that explains the elements of the dash, the global menus, the Software Center, Ubuntu One and anything else would be very useful.

    Suggestion 3: I think it’s finally time to revamp the startup sound! :)

    Suggestion 4: (Probably just wishful thinking) Try working with the company that produces Steam to finally bring a ton of mainstream games to Ubuntu. While the Software Center is nice, and there are a couple good games in there, there is a dearth of mainstream games. I dream of the day I can purchase Elder Scrolls games in the Software Center!

  18. Gavin Panella says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 10:54 pm

    When I realised that “Scopes and Lenses” meant “(Data) Sources and (What To) Show” I found it easier to understand. Sticking with familiar terms (well, they’re familiar to me…) might help with making it “something anyone can drive at first attempt”. Scopes already seems to be named Sources in the screenshot, so perhaps there is already some tension or uncertainty there?

    /me puts bikeshed swatches away again.

  19. d2kx says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 10:58 pm

    This looks great! I always read a lot of people moaning about your (Canonical’s) work, but I’d like to support the “we are quiet because we are happy and you’re doing it right” faction.

    I only hope that the issue with the proprietary AMD Catalyst driver is fixed. With Ubuntu 11.04, you had to install compizconfig-settings-manager and turn off “sync to Vblank” or you would experience bad Unity performance (applies to ALL AMD cards). No normal user would know how to fix that.

  20. Giulio says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 11:10 pm

    Thanks a lot for providing such a great product as Ubuntu!

    By the way, is that a mockup or a screenshot?

  21. Fawwaz says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 11:14 pm

    Good job, Mark.
    I noticed that 11.10 is much snappier than 11.04, and it looks prettier too!
    But there’s something bad about the dash: it doesn’t display much information, just the app name, for example if I’m searching for an app using the Apps lens, it will be difficult to find out which one is rated 5 starts, which one is free… although there will be filters, that is not enough.
    There’s something about the new panel: there should be an option to hide lenses, and the icons of lenses and Ubuntu logo in the panel should be similar to other application (look at the borders!)
    Thank you!

  22. Daeng Bo says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 11:29 pm

    Mark,

    I was a super-big fan of Unity until all my keyboard shortcuts went away. Win-a + “soft” + down / right + enter and the like no longer work. I’m going to have to get a mouse for my laptop because of this.

    Please make Unity keyboard friendly again!

  23. azurehi says: (permalink)
    August 16th, 2011 at 11:48 pm

    d2kx’s “we are quiet because we are happy and you’re doing it right” is fine for those happily living in the land of Unity. I am quiet and not happy with Unity. Mr. Shuttleworth’s determination to push Unity, no matter what, prevents constructive criticism from the common user. I use Lubuntu now and await Mint’s approach to Gnome3.

  24. Mark Shuttleworth: Το Unity παίρνει την τελική του μορφή says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 12:36 am

    [...] ενώ αναλυτικά μπορείτε να διαβάσετε στο blog τουScopes and LensesΤο Dash του Unity προσπαθεί να φέρει [...]

  25. lucazade says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 12:58 am

    “just use the source, Luke.” Fantastic!
    It was not easy to reinvent a new shell in such a nice and original way, I have to say Canonical almost achieved this.

  26. Dustin Kirkland says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 1:07 am

    I find myself really missing the Ubuntu logo in the top left corner :-(

    Other than that, and a bunch of compiz/3d crashes, I’m really liking Unity!

    Cheers,
    :-Dustin

  27. nadeem says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 1:13 am

    i like this new idea now unity looks and feels good. i wish that en enhancement of the search it self to be done. for instance in ubuntu 11.04 the search will get you identical results or so. but not descriptive, to clear it more if i write music not media banshee will not appear which is bad for new users they dont know the name banshee and they may not use the term media. i hope i am helping here
    my regards

  28. Dave says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 1:30 am

    Mark, that look absolutely gorgeous! I’m so glad you guys are sticking with Unity and make it awesome. To be honest, I don’t know what I think about having the button in the launcher, but I’ll let you guys do your thing.

    Thank you.

  29. Guilherme Aiolfi says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 2:13 am

    there is one thing that I hate (really): the orange color. Some version ago I thought we were going to replace it with a purple color (more modern and classy), but now we have both and there is no sign of which one will stay. If both are here to stay I have to say they do NOT fit together. Not even close, for me it’s like a yellow and green match.

    Another thing that seems out of place is the windows decorators. The dash is so nice, light, transparent and the windows decorations: heavy, no opacity, dark. It would be SO nice to see a windows decorations with the same aspect of the dash’s border. It’s important for the consistency of the system, to feel that it is just one thing and not pieces put together.

    Other than that, great progress. You’re in the right track. Unity isn’t for me yet, hopefully it will be soon.

  30. Hamzah says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 3:01 am

    I think that the panel should look like that all the time (the transparent blur version shown in the render), it looks better than its current style and having the panel change when the dash is activated looks cheap and confusing.

  31. Carlos Gijón says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 3:11 am

    I love Unity. Amo Unity. ¡Rock de road mark!!!

  32. Adnan says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 4:02 am

    It seems that, all the pieces are falling into the exact place. Thanks the team for the effort. But one thing is still disturbing me – the top left Big-Ubuntu-Button. The BUB is the key to everything in Unity, so it should be focused differently and distinguishably than the rest of the Launcher buttons. otherwise it really be difficult for the user to find out the Start Button of Ubuntu! ;)

    I’ve already mention the problem in the Ayatana list. I hope that, lots of people will agree with me on highlighting the BUB more. I also hope it’ll be fixed/modified before 12.04 (because that is release I am eagerly waiting for).

  33. Adnan says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 4:11 am

    By the way Mark, is there any possibilities of having unique new desktop icon set for Unity? I’ve heard some rumors that 12.04 is going to adopt a new icon set for Ubuntu so that Ubuntu can be stood out from the other distros. If it is going to be happened then that would be great. Please make it possible. :)

  34. Mr.Jones says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 4:45 am

    IGnatius T Foobar wrote -”Come on Mark, it’s a nice effort but some of us want the traditional panel-driven desktop; we want our computers to act like computers, not like smartphones. Please, please, PLEASE give us a permanent and non-deprecated option to operate with a “classic” (GNOME 2 style) desktop.”

    It is called XFCE sir install it and learn to use it classic Gnome isn’t coming back.

  35. További Dash módosítások várhatóak » Somlói Richárd blogja says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 6:39 am

    [...] Shuttleworth, az Ubuntu mögött álló cég, a Canoical megalapítója írt egy érdekes bejegyzést tegnap a blogjában. Az írásból kiderül, hogy az Oneiricre már így is elég nagyot változott [...]

  36. bobzr says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 6:40 am

    Some time ago there were 2 kinds of Linux desktops: (1) those looking like MS Windows and (2) those looking like Mac OS. That time is dead! Ubuntu now looks like… Ubuntu! and it looks great! Hats off for reinventing a new shell in such a unique and beautiful way. Of course it’s easy to rant and criticise, but I do believe that a majority of Unity users are simply silent “because they are happy with it”. Thanks for such an amazing experience!

  37. Black God says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 6:41 am

    Mark, thanks for the update.

    >in one view, one should be able to close successive windows from that top left corner even if they are not maximised.
    this may result in accidental (unintentional) closure of successive window also?

  38. Will Smith says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 6:41 am

    I really don’t understand the look. There’s too much going on just to accomplish a simple task. Linux users may like this, or at least, some might – but the average user (you know, the ones you’re trying to attract?) will be lost. This isn’t a ‘innovative’ desktop. This is Windows 7 and MacOS without the ease.

  39. Unity. Simplify Your Life, cambios recientes en Ubuntu 11.10 (video), bonita pantalla de cuentas de usuario en Ubuntu 11.10 y algunos Breves « Ubuntu Life says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 6:44 am

    [...] hecho, se nota que Mark está muy contento con todos estos cambios que se han ido [...]

  40. Bullrush says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 6:47 am

    My take on this is
    – Visually it’s a complete mess
    – Tries to make my 21 inch monitor into a smartphone
    – Takes away my desktop and gives me a panel instead
    – Replaces my current 8 virtual desktops with a task switcher

    I keep on wondering; how is this better? Is this progress? is this the reason Microsoft no longer considers Linux a threat to the desktop?

  41. slashvee says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 6:50 am

    Maybe I missed it somewhere…

    Why is the lens taking only part of the screen? That remaining frame is not gonna be good for anything I guess, why don’t you just default to fullscreen lenses and gain some room for them?

    The only reason I could think of this seetup is to allow some drag and drop from the lens to any application behind, but it seems to me a little complicated in terms of usability (i.e., the application has to fall partly in the frame uncovered by the lens.

  42. mark says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 7:42 am

    @slashvee

    Full screen is too heavy a transition in the case of very large monitors. So we have a heuristic that determines when we should snap to full screen, and when we should stay tight to the corner.

  43. mark says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 7:42 am

    @Bullrush

    You can of course have as many virtual desktops as you like, you have all the horsepower of Compiz at your itchy fingertips.

  44. mark says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 7:45 am

    @bobzr

    Thanks for your support. And yes, I agree, while there are still rough edges most users have come around to the view that this is the best free desktop option. 11.04 was the fastest-adopted release of Ubuntu ever (the percentage of upgrades, which we can judge quite accurately from wikipedia log analysis, was faster to 11.04 than any previous release).

    Mark

  45. mark says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 7:47 am

    @Fawwaz

    Yes, I agree that a preview would be useful. Thanks for the suggestion!

  46. Subhashish Pradhan says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 8:10 am

    Thank you Mark, for the update and for Unity. 5 years ago all these things would have been seen as impossible on linux but now… :)

    And I agree with Jim Raredon that an Introduction/Tutorial Video after a user’s initial login would be very helpful for getting accustomed to the interface. Also a new sound theme to complement Unity would be very welcome.

  47. exeva says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 8:20 am

    @mark

    I look at those Wikimedia squid logs from time to time; how are you measuring them for Natty adoption? The default 11.04 Firefox no longer communicates client distribution in the user agent string. And since patching Firefox to use “Ubuntu ” is a WONTFIX feature request, I’m assuming web analytics of Ubuntu adoption is borked for the foreseeable future.

    [ http://stats.wikimedia.org/archive/squid_reports/ ]

  48. Linuxer says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 8:31 am

    Amazing transparent ,I like this style,Mark keeps going on ,I like and use Ubuntu every day !!!

  49. Grant says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 9:03 am

    Is that torrented copy of The Informant (in your Dash) legal?

  50. mahen says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 9:23 am

    Great work, thanks for the update.

    There’s something wrong though, IMHO. It takes way too many mouseclicks to simply launch an app, except if it’s part of the favorites / recently uses ones compared to Gnome 2 or Gnome 3 in Fallback mode (yes, it wasn’t dropped, there’s a “compatibility” mode in Gnome 3!).

    Usually, people don’t have thousands of apps installed, and it usually is much more effective to quickly choose a category and then an app. It used to take 2 clicks and little mouse movements in Gnome 2. Now it takes 4 clicks and wider mouse movements –> IMHO, this is a big regression.

    There’s a lot of great work in unity. But the problem is that extremely simple tasks got more complicated ; the screen got a little more messy, you now have to think about making the dock reappear, etc. (it might also be a problem that applications and windows are a single button now, because switching windows also takes more time as you have to identify the app, then hover the mouse, then choose the right window ; so you cannot see at a glance what is going on. Well, this problem is more difficult to solve, as it’s the new behaviour in windows and OSX as well. It is nice in some cases, but wastes time in some others.

    But, the most critical problem is the dash, in my opinion… Most people don’t need a complex “search engine” as a “start menu”. This may be handy in specific cases, but for daily use and normal users who don’t want to type the name of the app or click many times, it’s definitely less efficient / more messy than the traditional minimalistic applications / shortcuts menus.

    I appreciate a lot what you do though. But please don’t leave efficiently for the “cool and new factors”. Well, that’s just my opinion and many people probably here disagree or already switched to XFCE / KDE, which is a pity considering all the great stuff done here :)

  51. Jimbo says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 9:58 am

    While I think the usability of Unity is going in the right direction I worry about the terminology used to describe it. I would consider myself a power user and yet I always found ‘Lenses’ a very abstract concept to understand due to the bad choice of name, and now the problem seems to have been compounded with the introduction of “Scopes”. I know for a fact that if I tried to tell my non-Linux geek friends about Lenses and Scopes they would completely stop listening. Seriously, Scopes? That is clearly a name picked by your coders with no thought of the average computer user.

  52. Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot – Melhorias no Unity - André Gondim | André Gondim says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 10:31 am

    [...] até então não tinham. Mas promete ter um visual e uma usabilidade ainda melhor, de acordo com Mark Shuttleworth.. O Ubuntu surpreende a cada [...]

  53. neuro says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 10:36 am

    Hope you paid for that copy of The Informant!, Mark …

  54. Nepenthes says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 10:55 am

    I have two personal criticisms about the new Unity Dash layout:
    1 -The “Refine search” in the new Unity Dash is not really useful : the advanced search functions should be shown from the start, without adding one more clicking in the process.
    2 – The lenses icons are too small and too far at the footer of the dash window. They could be placed nest to the search bar, just to its right, to minimize mouse movements.

    I have a proposal too : could it be possible for the dash to match the focused window ? For example, if a music app is running, if you click on the dash icon, the Music Lens is selected by default. Same Image, Video, Instant messaging or mail…

  55. Mashew Cashew says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 11:05 am

    Great Work! I really like the new dash and the Ubuntu Button being in the launcher. It feels much more snappier then 11.04 but I have had to remove the Dash Blur in Unity Settings because it makes the whole dash very laggy (It’s only in alpha though I suppose). Another problem is that when removing the Dash Blur, the dash is too transparent and any window that’s behind it obscures most of the content in the Dash! An option to change Dash transparency may work?

  56. ubuntu 4 life says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 11:09 am

    incredible work !
    I am using ubuntu 11.10 64 bit, I am impressed with the work being done !
    UNITY is very beautiful !! :^-)
    *congratulations to all*

  57. Vincent says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 11:13 am

    Looking excellent! I’m just wondering whether Unity’s also being usability tested on slower computers (like some netbooks) – Ubuntu can sometimes crawl a bit, and when a window takes a while to close, it can be very attractive to press the close button again. When all windows have that button in the same position, this might actually cause you to also close a window you did not want to close – which is _very_ annoying.

  58. Jannis Pohlmann says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 11:53 am

    It seems my earlier feedback was marked as spam by Akismet, despite not being offensive in any way.

  59. Linuxer says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 11:55 am

    Yes,except beauty,speed and performance are very very important !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  60. Alexander Trauzzi says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 12:15 pm

    The list of changes and some of the already completed patches for Unity in 11.04 have renewed some of my faith in Unity. It’s been a tough pill to swallow, but of all the “modern” desktop interfaces, Unity is by far the best and least obscure.

    I’d like to see some of Gnome2′s features and customization make a return to the Ubuntu desktop experience at some point. But as it stands, I think 11.10 could end up being another landmark release.

  61. Masoud Pourmoosa says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 12:20 pm

    Please also work on memory and speed. I really love Unity, but for my laptop with just 1GB of RAM it’s slow. I can clearly feel the decrease in speed from 10.10 to 11.04.

  62. bwah says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 12:38 pm

    what do you mean, “your goal”?!
    are you saying you released a half-baked shell to the world in april? and now you have dreams and hopes for it. good grief.
    and while you were recoloring icons and playing with your buttons, somebody else invented android and made the whole world use linux.
    there’s a failure in your corner somewhere.

  63. ma says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 1:06 pm

    I’m pretty sure you want to substitute the screenshot and delete this comment. The second file in the files row may be the reason :)

    Great work: things I love, things I love less but great effort in the end

  64. erpe says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 1:11 pm

    New dash looks very good expect the panel turning transparent too. Is there some good design-based reason to that?? I find that very confusing, since there isn’t relation between the dash and the panel. Can someone (even Mark) explain that?

    Other thing that I don’t like is Lenses in the Launcher. They shouldn’t be there, or at least they should be easily removable. What is the plan regarding to them?

    Good work Canonical! From 9.10 every new Ubuntu release has been my favourite (I even have Maverick Meerkat T-shirt :)) Hopefully Oneiric will be too!

  65. Daniel says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 1:20 pm

    Mark, unity has always been beatiful; This new mockup looks really really great!

    But let me say that the problem of unity is not the appareance, but the usability… i think it must have the focus..

  66. Ivan says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 1:24 pm

    New Unity looks good but it will not attract new users, especially not current Windows users because their problem with Linux is not the way it looks but the things which not working properly like audio, flash video, facebook video calls and a lack of popular third party applications and drivers for new cool printers and cameras etc.

  67. gompie says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 1:59 pm

    jesus, is this ugly… please give me back my classical gnome desktop!

  68. Rehdon says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 2:01 pm

    I’m one of the users sticking with 10.10, for now. I’m trying to keep an open mind, though, and I will surely try 11.10. One thing it’s got to have for me to use it, though, it’s a little more space for user customisation. One of my issues with Unity, f.i., is that the Dash is a less efficient replacement for traditional menus: if it could be customised so that it’d resemble a menu (smaller icons, tighter layout etc.) it would be a great thing, I’m sure many people (call us traditionalist if you want :) would appreciate it a lot.

    Looking forward to further developments :)

    Rehdon

  69. Joerz says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 2:01 pm

    Usability and functionality are up. But the look and feel is so so down. I don’t understand why everything needs to be transparent when Dash is in view???

  70. Jose says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 2:17 pm

    @Guilherme Aiolfi: I agree, purple and orange do not fit together, but green and yellow do. Tree leaves and grass use to be green and yellow, and they are very near on the color circle. The problem is that Mark decided to copy Mac colors without getting rid of the old ones, so now we have this mess, maybe it is too much work, but companies like Apple only do few things so they can finish what they start(As Steve J says the word they use the most is “NO”).

    @Jim: For games on Linux to work we need open graphic drivers, and they are not ready yet. One of my favourite pages is this:
    http://nouveau.freedesktop.org/wiki/FeatureMatrix

    The had done an impressive work but is not there as it takes a huge amount of work. It is also depressing to work all day handling only errors and crashes(just look at their mailing list).

    @Mark I really like the icons light and transparency, but I hate the panel border, what is that thing useful for?. It seems like a baroque exaggerated and “good for nothing” thing but ugly. Why not to have a clean and clear sharp transition like Apple does?

    Maybe it is the border handle, like Qt does. Just imagine this &%$%=**!!! border disappears, will it improve the screenshot?

  71. Ubuntu 11.10: un nuovo design per Unity e tante interessanti novità - Chimera Revo says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 2:26 pm

    [...] trasparenza che potrà essere impostata dalle opzioni CCSM di compiz relative al plugin per Unity! Dal blog di Mark Shuttleworth, si può notare che è stato introdotto anche una miglioria grafica che ora farà comparire i [...]

  72. Jose says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 2:32 pm

    I mean if you look at the windows corners, they are sharp, and big icons look almost square, but the panel has one round and exaggerated corner: it breaks consistency and just “do not look right”. People do not know what it is, but they perceive it for sure.

    In the bazaar that linux seems to be you can find hot dogs and luxury rings at the same stand as everybody wants to scratch their inch. Geeks love that but real people don’t buy it.

  73. Unity Pada Oneiric Ocelot Bakal Diberikan Nafas Baru | Amanz says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 3:19 pm

    [...] Shuttleworth kini telah pun mengumumkan yang mana mereka bakal membawakan pelbagai perubahan menarik pada antaramuka Unity melalui Ubuntu [...]

  74. Micah says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 4:17 pm

    Jim Raredon: Steam is just a platform for the distribution of Windows (and some Mac) games. Porting Steam doesn’t mean, say, Oblivion is going to work — it just means you could buy the Windows executable. Oblivion itself would have to be ported to Linux. Just look at what happened when OSX was ported to Mac. Windows games didn’t suddenly start working on Macs because the digital storefront they were bought through runs on Mac.

    Also, I hope you’re going to do something to explain “lenses” and “scopes” to new users of 11.10. Those terms mean nothing to users who haven’t read this post, I imagine.

  75. Don says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 4:37 pm

    Sorry, I tried Unity and hated every second I spent with it. This looks like a blurry version, with even less functionality.
    If I had wanted Win7, Or OSX, I would have gone after that. I’ve been a dedicated Ubuntu user for years, but the last version turned me off so badly, I went elsewhere. Not what I wanted.

    I AM SICK AND TIRED OF EVERYTHING BEING ENGINEERED TO SATISFY THE LOWEST COMMON DENOMINATOR. I DON’T WANT A DUMBED DOWN AND STUPID INTERFACE. I WANT AN INTERFACE THAT KEEPS UP WITH ME. THE ABOVE DOES NOT QUALIFY.

  76. Flimm says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 4:52 pm

    “Evidence based design rules.” Hear, hear!

  77. James says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 4:54 pm

    I’ve been using Ubuntu for a few years now, and I’m getting more and more impatient with the how unstable and rough around the edges it’s becoming. The Natty release was a complete catastrophe for me. One computer became totally un-bootable, an issue which was only dealt with a couple of weeks ago; as for the other computer, which Natty worked on no probs, I found that, although I loved the Unity idea, it was so awkward to use that I just had to give up on it. I know that you guys are doing some great work, and I still support Ubuntu 100%, but how is the average person who isn’t necessarily computer savyy supposed to deal with their computer suddenly becoming unbootable after an upgrade – which they are no prompted to do automatically when a new version becomes available. Some will say that such users should stick to the LTS versions, but the Ubuntu site directs everyone to the latest release and, since Maverick, users receive a message telling them that a new version is available and can be installed with a simple click. My parents-in-law use Ubuntu, I installed it on their computer after they got fed up with Windows, and they updated to Natty because they were prompted to do so. Had they had the same issues that I had with it, they would find themselves with an aubergine screen of death and (as far as they know) a loss of data (they wouldn’t have the tech knowledge to recover this data). When my mother also experienced problems with Windows, I’m afraid to tell you that I didn’t install Ubuntu on her machine for fear that she too would encounter issues when upgrading. I guess what I’m saying is, wouldn’t it be better to direct users to the LTS by default, and make the other distros available with the premiss that they are experimental and less stable? Sorry, this sounds like a rant, it’s not supposed to be, I’m just airing my experiences and opinions. I still think Ubuntu rocks!

  78. ubuntuuser says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 5:11 pm

    Are there any chances what’s so ever the buttons(:minimize, maximize,close) to go to right. Neither the gconf-editor(now dconf-editor) works in case of unity. Probably the move was made to put notification on right. Since, notification has freedom to move why does not the buttons have? I have never own a macintosh, so I feel coming to a very different world after unity.

  79. Jef Spaleta says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 5:12 pm

    Mark,

    I would strongly suggest refraining from making using of the wikimedia logs for making strong statements with regard to any linux uptake other than Android at this point. The wikimedia weblogs use 1:1000 log sampling. This sampling approach means there is statistically inaccuracy inherent in the numbers which wikimedia is not making you aware of. At 1:1000 sampling I really would not put any faith in any of the numbers below 1% in those tables.

    You _must_ read these logs in the same fashion as election polling which always present percentage with a caveat like +/- 3 %. Due to the 1:1000 sampling there really truly is a margin of error on those numbers.

    That being said, its really important to also note that the trending over the last 6 months shows that all traditional Linux distribution are trending downward. Ubuntu and Fedora are each a smaller percentage of the total in June than they were in Jan. And in fact Ubuntu is trending downward faster. On the other hand. All Linux is increasing upward. On the third hand, all linux sans Android is also trending upwards. Taken together this does not present a self consistent picture.

    How can All linux sans Android be trending upward when individual Linux distributions broken out are individually trending downward? It just doesn’t make sense. Unless of course something has changed recently, and Wikimedia can no longer tell the difference between one linux distribution or another. Like newer Firefox/Chrome user agent string no longer differentiating linux distributions.

    So what exactly is wikimedia using to “see” that a linux client is an Ubuntu linux client right now? We really need to know that in order to understand the trending I’m seeing. Until then, I think its very irresponsible for you to make public statements based on those wikimedia metrics. Until we have a clear understanding of the methodology, you can’t trust the numbers.

    -jef

  80. Mahesh Asolkar says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 6:05 pm

    I would like to echo @zekopeko and @Coppertop’s sentiment about the global menu. After many months of using Unity, I am still trying to understand the advantages of hiding the global menu until you hover the mouse over application name. I am not a UX expert, but hidden application menu can’t be intuitive to anyone, let alone a new user.

  81. exeva says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 6:12 pm

    @jef

    A wild, relevant response from an irrelevant observer appears! ;)

    > How can All linux sans Android be trending upward when individual Linux distributions broken out are individually trending downward? It just doesn’t make sense. Unless of course something has changed recently, and Wikimedia can no longer tell the difference between one linux distribution or another. Like newer Firefox/Chrome user agent string no longer differentiating linux distributions.

    Your suspicions are spot on here. As pointed out above, any Linux user browsing with Firefox 4+ will not have their distribution counted. So the count for Unknown distributions is ramping dramatically.

    https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=591573

    > I would strongly suggest refraining from making using of the wikimedia logs for making strong statements with regard to any linux uptake other than Android at this point. The wikimedia weblogs use 1:1000 log sampling. This sampling approach means there is statistically inaccuracy inherent in the numbers which wikimedia is not making you aware of. At 1:1000 sampling I really would not put any faith in any of the numbers below 1% in those tables.

    Your suspicions are mathematically indefensible here. In statistics, confidence intervals come from absolute sample size rather than relative sample size. For example, if Wikimedia counts 25,000 Ubuntu users out of 100,000 total sampled Linux users (25%), the standard error is sqrt((.25*.75)/100000), or 0.136930639%. In other words it’s really low.

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/1d/Marginoferror95.PNG

    Keep in mind, of course, this assumes Wikimedia’s 1:1000 sample is a true representation of the whole population. If there’s some subtle bias in collection (eg the log script samples users from early morning and Linux users are night owls), the reliability of the stats is compromised.

  82. yman says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 6:14 pm

    Enable browsing in the Dash:
    https://bugs.launchpad.net/unity/+bug/828177

  83. Brian says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 6:58 pm

    My biggest complaint with Lenses is that they do not seem organized in a way that reduces the time to find things. In fact, in my experience they make finding things much more complicated. Further, with touch screens, the paginated views used by the iPad and future versions of Gnome-shell make better use of spatial memory and are more touch friendly. Even Windows8, with its long linear tile clusters, is really just a smoothly scrolling page view; the only difference is that it uses an overlayed scroll bar along the bottom instead of glowing dots.

  84. Ubuntu 11.10 Features Improved Unity Interface | Current News says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 7:15 pm

    [...] “Perhaps this might make a small clearer the reasons for the go of window controls to the left – it was the only place where we could ultimately keep them consistent all the way up to a maximised window with the title bar integrated into the panel. I’m confident this part will all be settled by 12.04.” – said Mark Shuttleworth on his blog post. [...]

  85. manny says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 7:33 pm

    Wow, unity is looking to become an awesome UI on par (and better in many aspects) with “commercial” offerings

    But, now that unity and ubuntu has reached this level of maturity i think is a good time to look at the other aspects that are not letting us advance higher to the top…

    While i agree, 11.04 was the most installed release, it was also one of the rockiest one, and not totally because of the UI changes, but because of the amount of bugs and inestability. While it was a necesary change, a buggy release should not be trown directly at consumers, but kept for us testers and developers to handle.

    Consumers should not have to deal with this amount of bugs (most of them pretty trivial that havent been even fixed yet, because all development is being focused on the upcoming release).

    The bugs lower the value of a great product like ubuntu.

    If we want to compete with windows and osx directly, we need to focus on polish. Windows 7 was a great release thanks to the time microsoft took to actually read the reviews/suggestions, fix the quirks and polish it… this is how consumers rate a product: first impressions.

    Sure, polishing an OS may seem a bit boring from a developer perspective, but your users will dearly thank and the good press will reward you at the end.

    Now apart from polish, consumers, OEMS and app developers dont like the 6 month release cycle (too short and fragmented, because everybody seems to be using, selling or supporting a different release..).

    The cons of short release cycles are many:

    -Less time, more bugs, less polish.
    -More releases to support (higher support costs for oems, app devs, ubuntu devs?, etc.)
    -Consumers dont like to upgrade just to get the latest browser version..
    -Upgrading also goes bad many times. No fail safe way of doing it. Cant revert.

    If we want development to stay fast, but avoid these problems to the consumer base, a few suggestions come to mind:

    A)
    -1 release per year instead of 2?

    B)
    -An official stable OEM/consumer release every 1.5 or 2 years (semi-rolling for everything except unstable components)
    -And full rolling unstable / preview release for developers, testers and linux enthusiasts.

    C)
    -keep the same release model as now, but non LTS releases should not be pushed to consumers/OEMs and instead be labeled as “development/preview releases”.
    —-

    Windows 7 is the top choice with OEMS and if we want to compete, we need to offer the same advantages (longer time frame and the latest apps).

    We need to make every LTS release the focus of our attention so it can stay desirable to OEMs/consumers for most its life and have the same advantage as Windows releases.

    For an LTS to do this it needs:

    -Latest apps (not just the old firefox3, but also firefox 4 and 5)
    -Easy way to revert back if we have problems with the new app version (if firefox 4 doesnt support a plugin yet, i should be able to revert back to firefox3).
    -Software center should accept new app submissions for at least 1.5 years or till the next LTS comes (similar to what getdeb does.).
    -Get the community more involved (crowd source most of the pre-testing and rating of apps)

    non-technical consumers should not see a need to upgrade to a non LTS release just to get the latest firefox or libreoffice…

    from the “0install” developers experience it seems the problem with apps on ubuntu is also due to the lack of some features in APT:
    http://0install.net/comparison.html

    Having these features could really help make the platform much more attractive and possibly the top choice for developers.

    Apart from apps, we need to get OEMS highly involved in the LTSs (at least 5 or 6 months before release)

    And while at it, why not also promote these solutions on the website. Many new users to ubuntu would like to get it preinstalled, but dont know where to get it. 2 options on the site: Get ubuntu (download) or get an ubuntu/hardware combo.

    —-
    Like i said this is possible to-do today thanks to the level of maturity, independence and leadership ubuntu has reached.

    After 12.04 LTS, it would be a good time to consider some changes in this regard.

    Sorry if i was a bit long, but i dearly care about ubuntu/canonical and believe it has the potential to become one of the most widely adopted in the world, specially since you have proven that open dev is the future!

    Thanks :)

  86. Paul Sladen says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 7:33 pm

    Jef Spaleta: If you’re really interested in the Wikistats methodology: svn checkout http://svn.wikimedia.org/svnroot/mediawiki/trunk/wikistats/ && egrep --exclude-dir=.svn -ri '(User-Agent|Ubuntu|Fedora)' wikistats/

  87. Jef Spaleta says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 7:50 pm

    Paul,
    thanks. I have an email out to the contact at wikimedia. I cannot stress this enough, the 1:1000 sampling absolutely introduces a margin of error. People who want to use those stats need to be aware of it and I’m hoping I can convince the wikimedia people to add an appropriate margin of error note on their tables. Its way to easy for laypeople, not grounded in statistical analysis, to just see numbers and assume they are 100% accurate because no error measurement was provided next to the number. I don’t fault Mark for reaching for the numbers, or making the mistake, a lot of people do it. But that mistake can be very misleading. Its never a good idea to put a lot of weight, or god forbid make business decisions, on data which is inside the margin of error.

    The change in user-agent string behavior is another can of worms entirely. Now that firefox is not encoding distribution name by default in the newest revs, the distribution counts become very difficult to interpret.

    -jef

  88. Jef Spaleta says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 8:03 pm

    Paul,

    confirmed wikistats/squids/SquidCountArchiveProcessLogRecord.pm
    uses agent-string manipulation which is invalidated by recent changes in firefox default user-string encodings in both Fedora and Ubuntu.

    Now that default Firefox nor default Chrome encode the distribution name as of the April release of both distributions, the wikimedia metrics are assuredly going to massively undercount these distribution totals for both. The “Linux” sampling should still be valid, with the margin of error caveat.

    Does chromium on Ubuntu encode the distro name in the agent string as of 11.04?

    -jef

  89. Steven says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 8:16 pm

    @ Mark

    I like how much Canonical is investing in the whole Ubuntu Desktop the last few years.
    When i look back at Ubuntu 8.04 it was not bad but it had a poor interface.

    But the main problems i’ve with Ubuntu still remained :

    1)My Brother Printer is not recognized and i’ve tried to install drivers from the Brother’s homepage but still it doesn’t work and a not working Printer is already a reason to stay away from Ubuntu so there should be an easy solution invented for printers see Google Cloud Print http://www.google.com/chrome/intl/en/p/cloudprint.html or Apple’s method http://www.tomshardware.com/news/apple-printer-driver-network-cloud-printing-printers,13237.html perhaps Ubuntu could focus on a Ubuntu One Cloud Printing service.
    Installing drivers on Linux is very hard sometimes !

    2)Another Problem again it has to do with devices I can not sync my Iphone 4 with Banshee :/

    3)Ubuntu Software Centre it really needs a lot of improvements and very strict rules to be sucessfull there aren’t a lot of high quality applications in the Software Centre it’s always a pleasure to install Ubuntu but what’s next ? I think the only application i install is Gimp or Inkscape because there is no Photoshop avaliable. A minor detail is also that sometimes icons of applications are very odd like the gimp one for example there are much more even worse.
    Canonical should focus on bringing more software to the USC even free proprietary software not only paid games, there are a lot free proprietary software for Windows which i miss in Ubuntu like Picasa, Photofiltre, Paint.Net, itunes, Evernote, Windows live Messenger … I know that there are some free alternatives for Ubuntu but they lack so many features.

    So my suggestion is that Ubuntu should continue focusing on design but also putting a high priority in a smoother and better user experience in terms of device recognition and better software. The most applications in Ubuntu look very feature incomplete or have a bad interface like Empathy, Tomboy, … It would be so good if Ubuntu would develop it’s own applications like elementary is actually doing to get a well-fitting desktop and also
    it’s good for GNOME to get some real competition. Since Unity was introduced Gnome Shell
    evolved a lot.

    What i really like is the Ubuntu One Service but there shoud be an Ubuntu One app for the Iphone and for Windows too. I think Ubuntu should create more applications like this for the average user perhaps an office suite ? Not everyone is happy with Libreoffice, a serious note-taker better than Tomboy ala Evernote, there are so many areas where Ubuntu could fit in.

    I hope i’ll get an answer :)

  90. yman says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 8:29 pm

    Isn’t it about time the copyright information on this website was updated? It says 2006-2007. That’s 4 years old by now.

  91. Links 17/8/2011: Linux 3.0.2, KVM 3.0 | Techrights says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 10:13 pm

    [...] Dash takes shape for 11.10 Unity We’ve moved from the idea of “Places” to a richer set of “Scopes and Lenses”. Scopes are data sources, and can tap into any online or offline data set as long as they can generate categorised results for a search, describe a set of filters and support some standard interfaces. Lenses are various ways to present the data that come from Scopes. [...]

  92. Ubuntu 11.10 Features Improved Unity Interface - Find Latest Hot News | HotNewsDay.com says: (permalink)
    August 17th, 2011 at 11:08 pm

    [...] “Perhaps this might make a little clearer the reasons for the move of window controls to the left – it was the only place where we could ultimately keep them consistent all the way up to a maximised window with the title bar integrated into the panel. I’m confident this part will all be settled by 12.04.” – said Mark Shuttleworth on his blog post. [...]

  93. LXer: Dash takes shape for 11.10 Unity | Coders & Admins says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 12:14 am

    [...] Read More… [...]

  94. JairJy says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 4:21 am

    Usability. People want usability, they will pay for it, that’s why users prefer to pay for a OSX and Windows instead to using Ubuntu.

    The main problem with Unity is that it depends on the application launcher so much but at the same time the laucher is confusing and complicated.

    Just look the Star Menu on Windows 7. Small, uses less than a quarter of the screen. Fast, it doesn’t have open animation, just pops up instantly. Efficient, you don’t need to move the cursor from one corner to another, just up and down all the time and uses an efficient search window to easily find your apps. Easy to personalize; you can add your favorite apps and move element on the menu by drag N drop, and easily configure the menu by a propieties window.

    One simple thing like adding icons of installed applications to the desktop can bring usability to Ubuntu. Making a guided tour to show how to use your new interface (like on Windows 98 and XP… and Vista… and 7) will help to novice users to understand how to use Ubuntu. Documenting well yout operating system will help expert users to find the solutiong they are looking for. You should try that.

  95. Vadim says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 4:34 am

    The screen looks awesome, I might finally make the switch from Windows 7 to Ubuntu :)

  96. Ubuntu’s Next Unity Begins to Take Shape | Install Ubuntu says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 4:49 am

    [...] a Tuesday blog post this week, Shuttleworth outlined some of the latest efforts and developments on the new Unity [...]

  97. Tacco says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 5:00 am

    Great Mark…i’m gonna buy a new laptop just to taste all the news about Ubuntu 11.10…ehm…and to obtain Linux certification! ;) Keep up the good work!

  98. Greenfinger says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 5:35 am

    How could anybody possibly like what unity is doing to the ubuntu name. I mean come on now, what happened to the old linux? The customization, the power to change whatever you want, open-source feel? Isn’t that why we all switched from windows?

  99. mark says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 6:14 am

    @Greenfinger

    You have plenty of opportunities for customisation. First, you can apt-get any desktop environment you like. Each project writes its code the way it likes it, they are pretty much all available in Ubuntu. Second, you can take advantage of whatever customisation those projects offer. And third, you can modify the code of every aspect of the desktop experience in a standard Ubuntu install. Real end-users prefer clean, focused, Just Works rails for their PC’s. That’s what I personally am interested in building. So that’s where I put my time and my money. Rather than complaining about things you don’t like, put your time and money towards making them real.

    Mark

  100. mark says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 6:17 am

    @Jairly

    The preferred way to use the Dash is to hit the Super (Windows) key, type what you want, and hit enter. By contrast, the start menu on windows is very fiddly. I’m pretty confident we are ahead of the rest of the shell’s by designing for search first, and you’ll see Windows, MacOS and others like Gnome follow ;-).

    Second, user testing shows that users prefer having the desktop as their own to customise, and do NOT like having things pushed there by you or me or HP. So that’s our policy – the desktop is a blank sheet, you can put whatever you like there. Though I must say I’ve seen very few users putting application launchers there since we put the launcher where it is in Unity and made it big and bright and easy.

    Mark

  101. mark says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 6:54 am

    @Mahesh

    Yes, the hidden menu is suboptimal for now. We’re working towards something better.

  102. mark says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 6:55 am

    @Don

    Keeping up with you doesn’t seem to be a very high bar to set.

    Mark

  103. AnUser says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 7:39 am

    +1 @ Jannis Pohlmann

    “the blurry background is nice but IMHO too much detail still gets through and makes the entire thing look very busy.”

    Please revert flat darkening!

  104. manny says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 8:39 am

    +1

    @mark
    >”Real end-users prefer clean, focused, Just Works rails for their PC’s. That’s what I personally am interested in building.”

    I mean come on people, there are so many distros/environments doing the same thing, geared towards power users.

    Ubuntu is actually also trying to target the majority of normal end users and it has been doing a heck of a job so far, while still not forgetting about all the different types of individuals that make up this great community.

    For once it has maximum control over its interface and user experience. It can only get better.

    And if you prefer something else, there’s xfce, there’s kde, there’s lxde, there’s something for everyone and just a command / download away…

  105. Perfilando el aspecto de Unity Dash en Ubuntu 11.10 says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 8:52 am

    [...] Shuttleworth ha dedicado un artículo de su blog a desvelar algunas de las características que los desarrolladores están preparando para Unity en [...]

  106. Denis says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 9:26 am

    Thank you for the update.

    I very much like the refinement of the Unity interface. In the meanwhile I’ve become pretty comfortable with using Unity as well (apart from some minor bugs). Having the close button in a corner is a good choice, it will make closing applications faster and more convenient. I do wonder what this will imply for the auto show/hide feature of the launcher, as moving top left immediately showed the applications you are using). Testing how users respond to different interfaces is the way to go!

    Great idea to move to a more “search driven” desktop. I found myself starting most programs (not in the launcher) by typing the first two or three letters. I hope searching for files will improve massively as well, I always found that to be a burden in Ubuntu. Searching by keyboard input does seem to conflict with the recent move to touchscreen-based devices. Maybe there is a way to bring these two together…

  107. Understanding Unity « Ubuntu Forecast says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 9:46 am

    [...] Mark Shuttleworth posted a target render for Unity in 11.10 and explained some of the current thinking behind Unity. It gives a bit of [...]

  108. MikeStrom says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 10:10 am

    Dear Mark,

    though i understand that the Unity design people want to make a difference and make a “unique” look and feel, i think that the visual style is over worked. My advice for all the design people is to run Mac OS X for a few weeks, and then get back to Unity with critical eyes.

    I spend 90% of my time in Natty, and the rest in Mac OS X. Every time i switch to Mac OS X, i fee relieved and relaxed, and feel that what i’m looking at gives me more focus on the work i’m doing (C/C++, documentation, Photo editing etc). The visual elements, look and feel are simply _much_ better designed in Mac OS X, and gives a more relaxed environment.

    Another thing i notice when switching to Mac OS X is that the screen space is MUCH better used in OS X. I use a MacBook Pro 15″, and for some reason i always feel that Unity runs out of space, and leave me wishing i had a larger screen. However, Mac OS X never creates this feeling – on the very same laptop!

    I really hope this comments make sense. I’m a die hard Linux guy, and really want Linux to grow and become main stream!

    Good luck!

    /Mike

  109. Andrew Ampers Taylor says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 10:28 am

    This looks like a good second step, but I suspect it is only a second step and that 12.04 will see Unity greatly enhanced.

    I had my slight doubts in the beginning and when 11.04 was released I liked the way it was going, although I didn’t think this was anywhere near the end. So I adopted it and ignored all the the sniping from people who wouldn’t cope with something different. I do suspect that 11.10 is only the halfway stage so I will wait until I have played with 12.04 for a month before making a final decision whether to live with it or not. I suspect it will be so good that I won’t want to live without it.

    I am sure the question Mark had asked himself before he started on this road was, will the number of new users it will attract outweigh the numbers of people who leave for other distributions, or with other Ubuntu flavours. The latter wouldn’t worry him too much. Personally I think it will eventually lead to a stronger base within Ubuntu but only time will tell.

    Personally, I appreciate all the efforts Mark has done to bring Linux to the fore in business. An effort which seems to be successful. As we say in his own neck of the woods, he’s a “smart cookie”.

    Companies who have large technical offices (Insurance actuaries for example) could still use Ubuntu throughout all their administrative offices. So that could extend the market for Canonical Support salesmen and negotiators.

    Ampers

  110. Haku says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 10:58 am

    Hi. I really didn’t like Unity (I’m still using Ubuntu 10.10), but this looks interesting for me. Grafically it’s gorgeous. But it still needs some improvements.

    1. Finding should be at the bottom and should have blinking cursor on it for instant writing and searching. It should searching in programs or files by default, not the internet. For that we have browser.

    2. Panels transparency is great. But make it permanent. And make whole graphical theme like this. It will improve consistency, and for me it will look better (matter of taste).

    Good luck, thanks for your work (Canonical and community) and I hope I’ll use one of the next releases and don’t think about alternatives.

  111. Haku says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 11:08 am

    One more thing. The most important for me is, that Ubuntu/dash button is a part of the left starting panel. Now I don’t have a bad feeling, that the dash is above everythink else and that’s most important. Now it’s a part of everything else and I can concentrate on my work, which is for me most important. It’s just feeling, but it’s very important for me how I feel in a system I’m using. I have the same problem in Gnome 3 Shell, so I’m not using it too. For now. :-)

  112. Markus says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 11:14 am

    STOP being a fuckin retard SHUTTLEWORTH, and START listening what the majority of
    the Ubuntu community is fuckin telling you – Unity is a piece a cows shit.

  113. Διάβασμα #12 « Marios Zindilis says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 11:20 am

    [...] Dash takes shape for 11.10 Unity [...]

  114. phonixor says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 12:01 pm

    the webbrowser on the back shows the old scroll bars…
    are you reverting back or is that a minor mistake in the render?

  115. Nick Moeck says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 12:45 pm

    Mark, as you mentioned on Launchpad (https://bugs.launchpad.net/unity/+bug/668415/comments/2), the reason for not making the launcher movable is that you wanted it to always be near the Ubuntu button. Now that the Ubuntu button is in the launcher instead of the top bar, are there any plans to make the launcher movable?

  116. Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot – Melhorias no Unity « Sander's Blog ∞ says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 1:54 pm

    [...] até então não tinham. Mas promete ter um visual e uma usabilidade ainda melhor, de acordo com Mark Shuttleworth.. O Ubuntu surpreende a cada [...]

  117. Ubuntu 11.10 Features Improved Unity Interface | UpToNews.com | News Up To Date says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 2:02 pm

    [...] “Perhaps this might make a little clearer the reasons for the move of window controls to the left – it was the only place where we could ultimately keep them consistent all the way up to a maximised window with the title bar integrated into the panel. I’m confident this part will all be settled by 12.04.” – said Mark Shuttleworth on his blog post. [...]

  118. Trevor Philip says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 2:58 pm

    I am very impressed with how Unity is evolving Mark, and I am eager to see its final appearance in the next LTS.

    Please ignore the haters that frequently show up in other site forums such as phoronix. Most people who *like* something don’t necessarily come online to tell the whole world about it; they mainly carry on using it unaffected as to what others think.

    I am a big supporter of this project, and many people who have not used Ubuntu before found it quite pleasing to the eye, and easy to get the hang of.

  119. Alf says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 2:58 pm

    Right, now I know where you’re going. Maybe you should “take ideas” from LCARS directly and save lots of years of brainstorming, don’t you think? Great work anyways!

  120. erpe says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 3:15 pm

    Alternative Dash design: http://ubuntuone.com/p/1BJ5/

  121. john says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 3:15 pm

    Dear Mark Shuttleworth,

    I’m very grateful for what you have done with Ubuntu and Canonical. However I have to voice some strong criticism.

    At least to me it seems you have taken very personal interest in the design process of Unity. In the course of this it has become very clear that you do not have the expertise and experience required to design such complex interface as a computer system.

    Here’s a hint: You do not see or understand the difference between applications and windows. How else could you come up with such inconsistent and confusing layout? For a start I’d urge you to read the relevant docs and guidelines of your competitors. They all “get it”.

    Regards,
    a long term but now concerned Ubuntu user

  122. Today’s Links | Oscar david says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 3:21 pm

    [...] Aspecto de Unity Dash en Ubuntu 11.10 (0 puntos) Mark Shuttleworth ha dedicado un artículo de su blog a desvelar algunas de las características que los desarrolladores están preparando para Unity en [...]

  123. zelrik says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 3:28 pm

    Mark,

    That’s a great visual improvement. Looks a lot better like this. However, please make it rock solid! The current version on my desktop is almost not usable. I know this is not an LTS but it is a shame to have major bugs on a release.

  124. Dash takes shape for 11.10 Unity | Ubunlog says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 3:41 pm

    [...] Vía | Mark Shuttleworth [...]

  125. Mark Shuttleworth è intervenuto a descrivere Dash per Ubuntu/Oneiric | CorryL's Blog says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 3:41 pm

    [...] Via | Mark Shuttleworth [...]

  126. veepee says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 3:51 pm

    Very cool!

    So what about theming now? Ambiance as it stands is like from another planet next to this new desktop style. Sort of like ethereal and tactile mixed.

    Here’s +1 for a an elegant and minimal dark theme. :)

  127. Antoon says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 4:35 pm

    Mark,

    It looks great! I, for one, am a big advocate of pushing things forward as much as possible. I totally see what you guys at Canonical are striving towards.

    I recently gave Linux Mint a try, because it is said to be ‘the next best thing’ and really trying to provide people with what they supposedly want. (And ofcourse, it may be the case for some people.)

    So I tried it, and I have to tell you, it all feels so ‘passé’! It makes me conclude that you made the right decision of forking away from Gnome and Debian. This is a very exciting time for Linux in general, IMHO, and it’s thanks to Ubuntu!

    So, keep it up!

    Antoon
    Antwerp, Belgium.

  128. Paweł P says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 4:53 pm

    I love Unity and I’ve been using Linux half of my life.
    UX of Gnome 2 and 3 is broken and KDE is even worse.

    I love Unity because it stays out of the way and takes minimal screen area and looks awesome with fullscreen transparent console :D

    Keep up the good work and please don’t listen to programmers’ “advises” about design. There is enough unusable quirky apps out there ;)

  129. Jef Spaleta says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 5:21 pm

    @exeva,

    Thanks for the critique of my concern over the margin of error. I am prepared to concede that your calculations are more accurate than mine. So for argument’s sake I’ll use your +/- 0.13 % margin of error. Ubuntu itself shows a flat marketshare (within the 0.13 % margin of error) between may 2010 and april 2011. It’s notable that even the increase in activity during release months doesn’t rise above the margin of error. However may 2011 and june 2011 show a dip in Ubuntu marketshare which is outside that 0.13% margin of error. Most likely the UA string undercounting starting to show up in May 2011, which is a reasonable conclusion based on browser availability. And reusing that 0.13% margin of error as a reference mark. All Linux sans Android have been flat within that margin since at least as far back as May 2010 as well, further suggestive that the UA string undercount is in effect and the Ubuntu dip is not indicative of a linux marketshare slide.

    So yeah I fully expect to see Ubuntu’s marketshare in those stats to slide over the next 6 months as more users start using firefox 4+ that dont report the distro in the UA string. The linux distro breakdown from the UA string will become meaningless very quickly.

    -jef

  130. Damian says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 5:24 pm

    I very much like unity design goals etc.! But it could be based on KDE as well to have plasma-desktop and such nice things. My KDE-configuration comes unity very near. For taskbat patched stasks and the panels arranged like in unity. Window decoration is also no problem for KDE to have in panel. Only Dash plasma applet is missing. Marc, please go towards KDE technology, You , Ubuntu and mankind will not regret it :) PS: Ubuntu Software Center rock!

  131. Controversial Unity desktop gets UI makeover in Ubuntu 11.10 | Install Ubuntu says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 5:32 pm

    [...] Shuttleworth’s blog entry on the new Dash interface in Unity should be here. A recent OMG!Ubuntu! overview of the new Dash interface should be here. Related [...]

  132. Neomito says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 6:03 pm

    hola me llamo neo un gusto, me gusta como luce unity con gtk3 pero sera esta imagen la real cara de unity en ubuntu 11.10 o solo es algo como para que nos ilucionemos……….

  133. Omer Akram says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 8:00 pm

    I see icons in the dash as 64px but currently they are 48 is that going to change this cycle or the next?

  134. mark says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 8:38 pm

    @john

    Thanks, you’re probably right, I’ve got a lot to learn but I muddle along and perhaps some day someone will enjoy the result.

  135. mark says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 8:40 pm

    @Nick

    The launcher will move to the right for right-to-left languages, I think. But it won’t be arbitrarily placeable.

  136. mark says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 8:41 pm

    @Markus

    With wit and charm like that, I’m sure you’ll go far. Perhaps far enough to fetch a towel for the drool? Perhaps not.

  137. Paul says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 8:51 pm

    @Mark
    I think it’s rather disingenuous to say Unity is leading the pack with regards to a search focussed shell. I’m a massive fan of Unity, and eagerly anticipate the improvements Canonical is working on, however Windows 7 was out in 2009 and its Start Menu seems to be the inspiration for Unity’s search driven interface rather than the other way around.

    Hitting the super key, typing a search term and then hitting enter is how I’ve used the Start Menu since Windows 7′s release, and its results are often much more thorough than what Unity can come up with. For example, typing “internet” will bring up Internet Explorer as well as all other applications featuring the word “Internet”, any files in the user folder that feature the term and, crucially, it will also bring up direct links to various settings within the control panel such as firewall settings, internet options and a network troubleshooting utility. This makes settings much more accessible than when a user is forced to wade through menus, or look through every category in the Control Panel style interface. I’m hoping Canonical will be able to “tag” windows in the future so that relevant settings and applications that don’t feature the search term but are related will show up in the dash.

    Unity is great, but at the minute, Windows’s search driven Start Menu is superior to the Dash and I look forward to the day I can eat those words!

  138. Lorenzo B. says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 10:33 pm

    Mark,

    I like the idea of a searchable desktop, but I don’t get this Lens and Source thing. I’m am very sensitive to visual clutter and I think Lens and Source add to it. Can they be disabled? What are you going to show under Amazon, my Kindle books?

    Does the panel sort the apps it displays by last-used? And what if I click on “See 12 more results” will it take the whole available space, hiding the rest?

    What are files doing under the Internet panel?

    Overall I think the most annoying thing I’ll have to adapt to will be closing windows from the left corner, but I guess I’ll use CTRL-F4 much more then.

    If you’re going “searchable” then I agree with some other commenter that suggested there should be a search box with a blinking caret in the panel.

    I think most of the time I’d be using my launcher icons on the desktop and a midnight-commander file manager so I will not have to touch the left task bar.

  139. callo90 says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 10:48 pm

    Hi everybody….the problem with linux user, always have been the same, linux user is always afraid of change, if they feel happy with what they have and it works, why the hell do you need to change it?, that’s maybe the huge answer of why linux have the 0.9 % of market, changes aren’t good all the time, but in general they’re necessaries….if you are one of those user who likes the boring and the deprecate UI of gnome 2, you should stop using gnome because 1990(sarcastic date obviously) was a long time ago. there are a lot of projects which look exactly like old gnome, so stop writing stupid comments. Canonical is different, canonical is the only company which is not afraid of make big changes, that’s my personal opinion, that’s not the only truth, just my opinion…unity have a lot of things to improve, like performance, maybe the usability and another things, but in general they’re walking in the right way….about that mock, I think is really beautiful, Im a ubuntu user since 2007 and everytime a like it even more, I remember that ugly gtk theme (orange theme), and looking the ambiance and radiance getting better everyday Im really impressed and happy because ubuntu helped me to take the best decition in my life (ran away from that piece of $%”@ named windows xD), So good works guys, Im waiting impatiently for the new Ubuntu 11.10 :)

  140. Ubuntu 11.10 Fitur Interface Peningkatan Persatuan « Dunia Open Source Linux says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 11:09 pm

    [...] “Mungkin ini bisa membuat sedikit lebih jelas alasan untuk memindahkan kontrol jendela ke kiri – itu adalah satu-satunya tempat di mana kita akhirnya dapat menjaga mereka konsisten sepanjang jalan sampai ke jendela dimaksimalkan dengan judul bar terintegrasi ke panel saya. ‘m yakin bagian ini semua akan diselesaikan dengan 12,04. ” – Kata Mark Shuttleworth pada posting blog. [...]

  141. manny says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 11:19 pm

    @Markus

    troll comments like that deserve no attention..

  142. Steve says: (permalink)
    August 18th, 2011 at 11:21 pm

    Personally I think this looks hideous. I much prefer Gnome 2′s approach. Transparency – Why? It just makes things harder to read.
    Search based approach for finding things? Why? Much Much quicker to select from a traditional menu.
    Bright white for indicators? Why? Trying to be Apple? To me there is limited visual distinction between these icons – I prefer the to include different coloured icons to aid in distinguishing between indicators. These bright white indicators make me feel that I am using an old style CRT with the intensity turned up too high – I want to turn them down.
    I won’t be migrating to this any time soon, never if I can avoid it.

  143. Eric Whalen says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 1:38 am

    I (for one) have been using Ubuntu for about 4 years, and I absolutely love the Unity interface. The hot keys and fast management of all open windows is fantastic.

    Thanks, and I think this is a good direction to take Ubuntu.

  144. Jian H. L. says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 4:34 am

    don’t show window title and menu on top panel at the same time. I think this is way better:
    -top panel: x – O | window_title_only , when application window focused;
    -top panel: x – O | application_menu_only , when application window focused;

    icons on launch bar need to be more compact

    regards

  145. Jian H. L. says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 4:35 am

    don’t show window title and menu on top panel at the same time. I think this is way better:
    -top panel: x – O | window_title_only , when application window focused;
    -top panel: x – O | application_menu_only , when application window full screen maximized;

    icons on launch bar need to be more compact

    regards

  146. Jian H. L. says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 4:42 am

    After install and use Ubuntu on my home pc, I like Linux things more. This makes me like my Nexus One mobile more than before though it has some problems.

  147. Dan says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 6:26 am

    Over the past 13 years I have moved back and forth between operating systems and window managers for my desktop. I never stuck with linux for very long because it never felt right. After installing 11.04 and experiencing unity, it finally feels right. Don’t let the haters wear you down.

  148. Mark Shuttleworth è intervenuto a descrivere Dash per Ubuntu/Oneiric | Indipedia – Indipendenti nella rete says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 7:01 am

    [...] Via | Mark Shuttleworth [...]

  149. Nick Moeck says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 7:15 am

    @Mark, re: “The launcher will move to the right for right-to-left languages, I think. But it won’t be arbitrarily placeable.”

    That’s a shame. As a person with peripheral neuropathy in his hands and wrists, I find it easier to use launchers that are on the bottom of the screen, as opposed to the left side. Even the option to put it on the right while using a LTR language would be a big help to some people with disabilities. Placement options for frequently used elements of the OS are important not just to people who prefer them in different places, but also people who NEED them in different places because of physical limitations.

  150. New Gnome2 Fork Available: The Mate Desktop » Luthfi Emka says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 9:03 am

    [...] blogged this week about some of the Unity / Dash improvements for Ubuntu 11.10. In particular, Dash takes shape. There’s numerous visual refinements, performance improvements, panel and dash advancements, [...]

  151. Torsten says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 10:04 am

    Hi,
    is it a good idea to have the lenses & sources on the right side?
    That means you have to click the launcher on the left. Then move the mouse all the way to the right side to select a lense. Just to go back left to select a program…

    The new window scroll-bar:
    Has anyone tried to work with that on a tablet. It is impossible. You have to touch once close to the corner of the window (at a very specific distance to the border) to make the scoll-handle appear. Then lift your finger again to grab the scroll-handle (which often has already disappeared again before you get it…). The new scroll-bar makes Ubuntu 11+ unusable on a tablet computer (if there are no plans for other ways of scrolling – e.g., multi-touch scolling that works in all applications, from webbrowser to file manager). Until something like this is not implemented it is not usable.

    Cheers,
    Torsten

  152. guest says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 10:58 am

    LOL Look at the screen shot closely :)
    http://www.markshuttleworth.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/dash_home_11.10.png

    The.Informant.2009…BT.cd1.avi == The Informant 2009 BDRip XviD-iMBT

    Looks like even Mark can’t afford to pay for movies this days.

  153. guest says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 11:00 am

    The Informant! (2009) Plot: The U.S. government decides to go after an agri-business giant with a price-fixing accusation, based on the evidence submitted by their star witness, vice president turned informant Mark Whitacre.

    But then again, it looks like this movie about “Mark”. :)

  154. guest says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 11:07 am

    Also, if Scene-1.swf is > http://www.aspectsindia.org/flash/Scene-1.swf
    Then good job attending Aspects School of Animation & Design, I hope it helps Ubuntu.

  155. Soren Olesen says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 1:00 pm

    @Mikestorm + Mark: I’m a 90% Ubuntu and 10% OS X user as well. While I agree that the level of polish in OS X is better than in Ubuntu, I don’t agree with your other two points.

    1) I think that Ubuntu makes better use of screen estate than OS X. The fact that the launcher is at the left is very important in this. In OS X you can move it – I did – but I don’t see that done very often. Furthermore The Launcher in Unity has so many keyboard shortcuts that are so easily discoverable that even ordinary user might use them. So it is not as neccesary to have the Launcher visible always in Ubuntu as it is in OS X.

    2) I think that sense of a better look and feel in OS X comes a lot from the applications that are available in OS X. I happen to use some of the same applications on both platforms: Chrom(ium) and Lyx. And the look and feel is actually better in Ubuntu because Chromium integrates so well with the indicators and the Launcher. However some applications on Linux just don’t have a very good look and feel. My main issue being office applications – but that’s not Unity’s fault.

    I still think that Unity is lacking some areas – and I bet that you agree with this, Mark: the icons could use an overhaul; the search experience in the Dash could be improved and the system settings could be more discoverable and usable etc. But what really gives me confidence in Ubuntu is that it seems that Canonical, the Design team and the people on the Ayatana mailing list value constructive user feedback and recognize that Unity and Ubuntu can and should be improved.

  156. Eric Mesa says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 1:59 pm

    I think scope is awesome! It certainly solves the issue of these types of systems – dash, KDE’s alt-F2, Gnome’s similar thing, Gnome-Do – that can search both your desktop’s programs and files and then internet. I hope it migrates to the other desktop shells.

    As far as 2D Unity – as someone who also wishes to run Ubuntu in a VM, this is a very welcome development. Also, I’m a HUGE KDE person (my main system is Fedora) and the QML stuff is really awesome! Can’t believe it took this long to get here.

  157. Francisco Barrena says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 2:07 pm

    Mark, now that Google acquired Motorola Mobility is your opportunity to get closer with other hardware manufacturers and put Ubuntu in the place it should be. Ubuntu is much better than Android and always wll be. We want Ubuntu as default OS in tablets and smartphones! Acer Iconia and Samsung Galaxy are good examples of tablets that would be better having Ubuntu.

  158. Mark says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 3:17 pm

    You guys are doing a great job with Unity! Keep it up. It will take time but I like the direction Ubuntu is going. It’s a step away from the traditional Linux desktop that looks boring. Mind you boring != bad. It’s just that KDE is like Windows (Despite that, I love this DE and has been my primary one since 2001 or 2002 until I changed distro back in Lucid Lynx so I’m kinda new to Ubuntu) and Gnome is like Mac. That leaves Ubuntu, dare I say Linux(?), with what – a copy? Hate to say that.

    With Unity and all the features going around, it’s different. Change will always meet resistance as was my first reaction with the idea of Unity. Then again I used it for about 2 weeks and I began to like it. By the end of those 2 weeks I was in love with Unity. Now, I’d hate to go back to classic desktop. LOL!

    :D

  159. yman says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 3:19 pm

    Pressing a button in the launcher should always produce the same results. When you press it, it means you want to put the focus on that app. If the app only has one window, that window should get the focus. Otherwise, all windows should be presented in Expose-style (if that is the correct term). The one exception is apps like The Gimp which have extra windows containing not separate documents, but parts of the UI. In cases like that perhaps you should bring the “support” windows to the front and put the focus on the document window. If there are multiple document windows, then display them in Expose-style.

    I also find it very annoying to only be able to search and filter in the Dash, when I often want to browse. This is especially important for when I want to browse applications. Being able to filter by application categories isn’t enough, as I install a lot of apps and then organize them in sub-categories. Having only filters would result in a mess. I would also like to be able to browse in other lenses, and I really don’t think that adding browsing would interfere with the other functionality. It could be implemented so the user only sees “categories” when he is in a particular lens and only when not searching. In that circumstance the categories would be displayed at the top of the search results area, followed by items that don’t fit in any category, as it is in a file browser. The bug report is here:
    https://bugs.launchpad.net/unity/+bug/828177

    I would mark it as a wishlist item, but apparently I’d have to become the bug’s assignee in order to do that, and I’m not sure I’m fit for the task.

  160. yman says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 3:43 pm

    Off topic:
    All apps should be treated the same, regardless of whether they are commercial or free. While the platform should remain stable, and apps should only receive bugfix updates by default (at least on the LTS), there should be an easy option to enable feature updates. This way I can have Firefox 6 on Ubuntu 10.04 without resorting to the backports repository, PPAs, or other non-trivial work-arounds (well, they may be trivial for me, but my Dad would find them unnecessarily annoying).

    The MyApps portal should be the one and only way to get apps into Ubuntu, regardless of licensing. Adding support packages should be allowed, and all apps, again regardless of licensing, should be installed into /opt. Packages that aren’t apps but are intrinsic to a particular app should also be installed in that app’s folder under /opt. Only stuff that is shared across multiple apps or is a part of the platform should be installed outside of /opt.

  161. Ubuntu tweaks Unity UI, adds ARM for servers | AspenIT.co.uk | Computing & Technology News says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 4:26 pm

    [...] describe a set of filters and support some standard interfaces,” said Shuttleworth in a blog post. “Lenses are various ways to present the data that come from [...]

  162. Paul says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 5:25 pm

    @Mark
    I think it’s rather disingenuous to say Unity is leading the pack with regards to a search focussed shell. I’m a massive fan of Unity, and eagerly anticipate the improvements Canonical is working on, however Windows 7 was out in 2009 and its Start Menu seems to be the inspiration for Unity’s search driven interface rather than the other way around.

    Hitting the super key, typing a search term and then hitting enter is how I’ve used the Start Menu since Windows 7′s release, and its results are often much more thorough than what Unity can come up with. For example, typing “internet” will bring up Internet Explorer as well as all other applications featuring the word “Internet”, any files in the user folder that feature the term and, crucially, it will also bring up direct links to various settings within the control panel such as firewall settings, internet options and a network troubleshooting utility. This makes settings much more accessible than when a user is forced to wade through menus, or look through every category in the Control Panel style interface. I’m hoping Canonical will be able to “tag” windows in the future so that relevant settings and applications that don’t feature the search term but are related will show up in the dash.

    Unity is great, but at the minute, Windows’s search driven Start Menu is superior to the Dash and I look forward to the day where the situation is reversed.

  163. 2 cents worth says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 6:28 pm

    Hi Mark,

    Just curious, what inspired you to name your company Canonical? I was doing some computer research and I came across the word ‘canonical’ in algorithms.

    Behold the wrath of Shuttlewrath – I never recovered. :)

  164. Yeni Ubuntu’ya yeni tasarım! | Pc Rehberi says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 8:10 pm

    [...] gelecek yeni Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot’ta değişecek mi? Geçtiğimiz salı gönderdiği blog  yazısında yeni Unity’nin nasıl değişeceğini açıklayan Shuttleworth bir ekran [...]

  165. AdlerHorst says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 10:12 pm

    Dear Mr.Shuttleworth

    Thanks for your working. I Like your System design. Not every bits, but that is Okay and normal.
    You do things that should be done. Clear that souch things not could be don perfect, but should be done any way. In the folowing line I tell you my thinking about thing should be done.

    Better Display tool who could work with LCD Displays and display connected over Bluetooth, USB or W-Lan (smaprtphones who charg) on that maybe indicators could watch there Informations in fullscreen.

    Enhanced Pulseaudio. I use the ability to automatic connect the PC. Soundcard with my laptop if it could reach it over W-Lan. I wish this thing wit my android to. I wish to tell my pc to take a second mic to filter the sound from the streat from my desctop mic. I wish to tell VLC ore Dragonplayer, that they have to stop if I get an Incomming Call from Skype, Jitsi or if possible Android Mobilephone.

    I wish a bluetooth stack who allowed my set up my PC as a Headset, Kyboard, etc. File transfere? this I do over USB connected as a HardDrive or over Ubuntu One.

    If I had Problems and I need Help in a Ubuntu Forum (ubuntuusers.de), every time I had to set Multiple commands on a Terminal to tell my Helpers my hardware config and Setup. There should bi an easy system information center with an export tool for supporter. The system check tool could be a good beginning.

    Please made an android like right management as default for not canonical PPA-Sources and begin to migrate every package to Apparmor.

    Please say godbye to webaddress based package sources and say hello to a Tag based one. so you’re much more flexible so we User too.

    Please add an Database Filesystem. /home/username/Video could be the way to a file in the fututer too but /username/Video/home works same, because the / is a seperator.

    At last and that thing that should be done not platform specific is API collection for Kontact!, Calendar, todo, file sync. With connectors to that API for many Clients and Programs. Android, Thunderbird and Akonadi, M$ Outlook, Apple. Server software exist enough they only should implement an API. Prefered one who is near them they us anyway.

    Some of this on top you will find on Brainstorm too.

    Thanks for read. Be aware I’m not a Developer, not a hacker and at last not a native English speaker. So could be, that the Text on Top looks like big rubbish for you. If so forget it and delete it if you’re a moderator.

    Thanks
    AdlerHorst

  166. Ubuntu’nun yeni Unity arabirim şekilleniyor | TeknoBilgiler.com // Teknoloji Adına Herşey, Teknoloji Haberleri, İşletim Sistemleri, Cep Telefonları Dokunmatik Cihazlar says: (permalink)
    August 19th, 2011 at 11:54 pm

    [...] salı gönderdiği blog yazısında yeni Unity’nin nasıl değişeceğini açıklayan Shuttleworth bir ekran [...]

  167. Mark Bidewell says: (permalink)
    August 20th, 2011 at 12:56 am

    I love the direction that Unity is going – excellent use of screen real estate. However, I am concerned that there is too much focus on effects (this goes for KDE and GNOME as well). Even though my laptop can run Unity-3D, I use the 2D version because it feels faster and I don’t like seeing 3% CPU activity just updating the DE. I want the lion’s share of my system CPU to go to my apps not my DE.

  168. Yeni Ubuntu, Yeni Tasarımı İle Geliyor | BİLTAG | Bilişim ve Teknoloji Araştırma Grubu | Bilim ve Teknik Araştırma Grubu says: (permalink)
    August 20th, 2011 at 1:16 am

    [...] salı gönderdiği blog  yazısında yeni Unity’nin nasıl değişeceğini açıklayan Shuttleworth bir ekran [...]

  169. Yeni Ubuntu’ya yeni tasarım! | Coders says: (permalink)
    August 20th, 2011 at 6:16 am

    [...] salı gönderdiği blog  yazısında yeni Unity’nin nasıl değişeceğini açıklayan Shuttleworth bir ekran [...]

  170. Yeni Ubuntu’ya yeni tasarım! | İyiBlog.Com – Güncel Özgün Blog says: (permalink)
    August 20th, 2011 at 9:10 am

    [...] salı gönderdiği blog  yazısında yeni Unity’nin nasıl değişeceğini açıklayan Shuttleworth bir ekran [...]

  171. mark says: (permalink)
    August 20th, 2011 at 10:18 am

    @2 cents

    I liked the idea of “one clean, simple, obvious way to do it”. And so did everyone else at what was then called no-name-yet.com :-)

  172. MattiK says: (permalink)
    August 20th, 2011 at 3:17 pm

    @bwah:

    “what do you mean, “your goal”?!
    are you saying you released a half-baked shell to the world in april? and now you have dreams and hopes for it. good grief.”

    11.04 was developer/experimental/preview release, not LTS. I think this should be informed more clearly. Unity is ready next summer.

    @Mark:

    “You have plenty of opportunities for customisation. First, you can apt-get any desktop environment you like. Each project writes its code the way it likes it, they are pretty much all available in Ubuntu.”

    These are usually poorly tested on Ubuntu. I prefer Debian if I want to customize more. Ubuntu is best on default desktop and applications.

  173. Anonymous says: (permalink)
    August 20th, 2011 at 4:38 pm

    [...] [...]

  174. Dominik Babic says: (permalink)
    August 20th, 2011 at 5:18 pm

    With my current Laptop (Asus P 53 with Intel Core i5 2410M and Intel GMA HD 3000) it’s just amazing. The new style looks very cool. And it’s a good mix of own ideas, the MacOS X interface and the Window$ 7 superbar.

  175. Jonathan says: (permalink)
    August 20th, 2011 at 8:32 pm

    Wow. Dash is looking awesome. Unity is maturing. 11.04 was quite rough around the edges because of Unity but I can see that 11.10 is getting really nice. Keep up the good work!

  176. ibra says: (permalink)
    August 20th, 2011 at 9:45 pm

    cool, but i still love gnome 3.. gnome 3 better n manly

  177. Yeni Ubuntu’ya yeni tasarım! | Linux Türkiye says: (permalink)
    August 20th, 2011 at 9:51 pm

    [...] salı gönderdiği blog yazısında yeni Unity’nin nasıl değişeceğini açıklayan Shuttleworth bir ekran [...]

  178. Gary Martin says: (permalink)
    August 20th, 2011 at 9:53 pm

    I am currently Beta testing 11.10 it looks great! The only problem that I am having at the moment, would be to use the Ubuntu font for the panel title text for a consistent experience. Keep up the great work!

  179. Ubuntu 11.10: Scopes dan Lenses Gantikan Places « GudangLinux says: (permalink)
    August 21st, 2011 at 6:49 am

    [...] pemaparan yang disampaikan di blognya pendiri Ubuntu Mark Shuttleworth, Unity mendatang diberi kemudahan [...]

  180. idontknow says: (permalink)
    August 21st, 2011 at 11:14 am

    I would recommend that the designers for Ubuntu read the book “About Face 3″ by Alan Cooper.

    The book is about goal-oriented design for technology product. It’s about making the goals of the user easy to attain.

    When I see the screenshot preceding the article, one thought comes to my mind: It’s way too complicated. When I use my PC, I absolutely do not have the goal to know what “lenses” or “places” are. I would never in my life try to explain to my mother what “lenses” and “places” are.

    The design on the screenshot has its emphasis on technical stuff, on the order and hierarchy of menus (even with proprietary names).

    Keep it simple, please.

  181. celso says: (permalink)
    August 21st, 2011 at 4:04 pm

    Well, i have been using ubuntu since 7.04 version and ubuntu never desapointed me! Every time that i install a new version, i see that is even better and better!

    Mark, please keep up the good work!

    One small note: please improve the themes and icons. they look obsolete. We only have ambiance and radiance but they are the ones that look good on ubuntu and radiance it doesn’t look good with the dark dash.

    Sorry for my bad english!

    Cumps,

    Celso

  182. Chin Wong says: (permalink)
    August 21st, 2011 at 5:03 pm

    Hi,

    “Places” is easier to understand than “scopes” and “lenses.” Just my 2-cents worth.

  183. MattiK says: (permalink)
    August 22nd, 2011 at 9:36 am

    @Mark:

    The idea came to mind.. HP touchpad tablets are now “free” and HP’s may have large stockpile that could get almost for free. They just want to get rid out of them.

    Wonder if possible to get this stockpile, engineer Ubuntu on them and sell them as Ubuntu tablets? I don’t have no idea is this feasible. It require’s logistics and semi-industrial way to install the software.

  184. enolive says: (permalink)
    August 22nd, 2011 at 9:38 am

    Wow, great!

    While I like Unity in 11.04, the dash is probably the worst part of it (some reviewer compared the application lense and the Places dash with the worst GUI since MS BOB ;)). I never understood this Places screen and why lenses are placed on the launcher. The new dash looks promising since its major flaws in 11.04 seem to be fixed. The colors look a little bit too purple for my tastes but I guess it’s due to this default wallpaper. I’m also looking forward to see LDM and the new login screen in action!

    Can’t wait to try it out on my laptop!

  185. Ubuntu's Next Unity Begins to Take Shape says: (permalink)
    August 22nd, 2011 at 1:36 pm

    [...] the next version, which will appear in Ubuntu 11.10, or Oneiric Ocelot, this October. In a Tuesday blog post this week, Shuttleworth outlined some of the latest efforts and developments on the new Unity [...]

  186. kikl says: (permalink)
    August 22nd, 2011 at 2:28 pm

    My first impression? I love it!

    Both the lenses and sources (filters) improve usability considerably. The design looks a lot more sophisticated. I hope you could improve the search algorithm too. I shall test the 11.10 beta as soon as it is published.

    All the best

    Kikl

  187. AndrewB says: (permalink)
    August 22nd, 2011 at 2:56 pm

    Mark, just want to add my name to the list of those who like Unity and support the new direction. I think 11.04 is already great, and actually I prefer it to OS X using it with multiple desktops. The Unity debate reveals both the passion of Linux users, and also the fact that a lot of them are very conservative. But there are many happy users of Unity who just want their computer to work and do not want to waste time configuring it as you mention in a comment above. I am one of them – my days of customizing Linux and frittering away my life add/removing docks, icons, panels etc. are over. I just want a polished, functioning desktop that looks nice, and you are providing that. Kudos.

  188. AndrewB says: (permalink)
    August 22nd, 2011 at 4:04 pm

    One other thing – I really think it would be good to have an animation or presentation – “What’s New in Ubuntu 11.10″ – that automatically opens after an upgrade or install. This could show the user how to make use of the changes. For example, in Ubuntu 11.04 I was confused by keyboard shortcuts until I downloaded the shortcuts wallpaper that someone made. Couldn’t this be integrated into the installer? I think that this would really help new or older users adjust, or people that are not so tech-savvy.

  189. Ayn says: (permalink)
    August 22nd, 2011 at 5:22 pm

    As a hobbyst I’m a digital artist and I ask you if it is possible the following things:

    1) Improve the support for wacom tablets, especially take some of the exciting GUIs to configure a wacom tablet and make it a little bit more professional. So it will be easy to configure the pressure and the extra keys available on the tablet

    2) Krita latest version is really amazing, but some QT libraries on Ubuntu were patched for Unity so now it’s impossible to use Krita with a wacom tablet, every line starts from the top left corner. That is a pity.

    3) There should be a standard for shortcuts, compiz overlaps with programs like Blender, inkscape etc.

    4) Make it easier to configure monitors to rotate without the need of editing xorg. I have a dual screen and I can rotate to portrait both screen with a pivot. Every time I upgrade Ubuntu I have to figure out how to configure everything to rotate the desktop (and the wacom’s pen) using one single key.

    5) Ask to test Ubuntu and receive tips not only from designers, but also from digital artists like David Revoy (I would hire him). I’ve notice that artists have very interesting and pragmatic ideas about how to setup their environment and they have great taste.

    6) Please add to Unity the possibility to move from a workspace to another using the mouse wheel. I used that on Karmic using Compiz and now I can’t make it work anymore on Natty.

  190. Eric Mesa says: (permalink)
    August 22nd, 2011 at 7:14 pm

    @Celso – not sure how easy it is to install, but the icons that Mint 11 is using are AWESOME! And Mint is based off of Ubuntu, so there should be a way to install those icons in Ubuntu. Look into it!

  191. Francis Bolduc says: (permalink)
    August 22nd, 2011 at 11:21 pm

    I think Unity is a great touch interface, but a poor keyboard-mouse interface.

    The disappearance of the scrollbars and the transformation of the application menu into a wall of large icons illustrate that pretty well. It is a touch-screen interface.

    Pushing Unity as the default shell was a great way to get free testing.

    All those who preferred the “old and boring” Gnome2 have just been used as beta testers in 11.04.

    If it had been an opt-in instead of an opt-out, there would have been no complaints.

    But now, with 11.11, they have no choice. They must adapt.

  192. Tom Collins says: (permalink)
    August 23rd, 2011 at 1:24 am

    You hopeless cretins will be ditching this bundle of cruft and shipping gnome-shell by default in a few cycles.

  193. Thiago Marcos P. Santos says: (permalink)
    August 23rd, 2011 at 8:23 am

    Unity is the best window manager since WindowMaker and Fluxbox. Please guys keep with your good work. I love it.

  194. pwl says: (permalink)
    August 23rd, 2011 at 11:17 am

    @Mark:

    I wholeheartedly agree that there must be one simple way to use Ubuntu. Regular users surely don’t want to mess with the settings, particularly those who have just recently left the Windows ecosystem. So we must respect their habits, especially since in the end, when the long-awaited Year of the Linux Desktop comes, they will constitute the majority of the Ubuntu users.

    However, I think the current way of ‘dumbing things down’ misses the power users by removing the convenience of customisation, e.g. moving configuration options from a preferences dialog to a file or removing the advanced feature at all. Power users love configuration GUIs too. They love customisation. Why can’t there be an ‘advanced’ tab with the options for the power users? Both the regular and the power users would be happy then.

    –pwl

  195. Stuart says: (permalink)
    August 23rd, 2011 at 11:57 am

    I have a question about a design choice in Unity.

    We now have the ultra thin scollbar to save space, which in my opinion is a usability nightmare. But then the rest of the GUI has massive widgets, large fonts by default. Does this not seem a contrast? We could save much more space by smaller font sizes, less oversized widgets. Both OSX/Windows have smaller widgets and font sizes by default, it makes using them very pleasant.

  196. Justin says: (permalink)
    August 23rd, 2011 at 12:17 pm

    @mark

    Since the Dash invocation have been integrated in the Launcher…

    ….how about you integrate the clock, messaging menu and other app-indicator too? Then remove permanently the top panel and move the launcher to the bottom. The results will be a Windows 7 Superbar!!

    Yay!! Woohhooo!! Ubuntu 7!! Isn’t that cool??

  197. qneill says: (permalink)
    August 23rd, 2011 at 3:38 pm

    Mark,
    I am a double decade Linux user, warming to the Unity desktop, but still not sold.

    I use ubuntu for its excellent package management and wide array of applications; moving to a new desktop paradigm was unsettling but I still appreciate all the thought and design work it shows.

    My top 2 suggestions are ensure Unity is keyboard friendly and reduce the number of clicks to launch apps.

    And if I may suggest, let the likes of @Don and @Markus sound off without gracing them with a reply. Silence is perfectly acceptable, and it is very difficult to reply with anything meaningful while remaining professional.

  198. yman says: (permalink)
    August 24th, 2011 at 3:12 pm

    I concur with the people who say Canonical should market the non-LTS releases as development releases (or releases for tech enthusiasts) and market the LTS releases as the stable/regular releases. Nothing needs to change except for the marketing, and perhaps OEMs should only put LTS releases on their devices. This is especially true if you change your policy so that apps can be updated within a release. Of course, the platform for each release should remain stable, but there’s no reason not to allow feature updates to apps by default. In the config utils there should be options for the update policy: no updates, security updates only, bugfix and security updates only, or all updates (should be default. includes stuff like upgrading from FF4 to FF5 or GIMP 2.6 to GIMP 2.8, etc, for all types of apps, commercial and non-commercial). Also, in case I didn’t say this already: Adding an app should be the same regardless of whether it’s “for purchase” or “for free”, and regardless of licensing (whether it’s Free Software/Open Source or not). All apps should be installed in /opt/, all apps should be added and managed via the MyApps portal, etc. The only differentiation should be between platform and apps, and that difference should exist regardless of whether or not it’s installed by default.

  199. Otto Kekäläinen says: (permalink)
    August 24th, 2011 at 7:24 pm

    I can’t find a dev site with the usability testing use cases, so I’ll simply suggest one use case here, since I think there is an area in Unity that is troublesome.

    Usability test case: File management
    Ask user to download file ABC.zip from site Example.com and save it in their Ubuntu One folder. Then ask the user in insert a USB stick, and to copy ABC.zip from the Ubuntu One folder to the USB stick. Finally ask the user to open folder XYZ, pick the Ubuntu logo (whatever the file name is) and move the file to their home folder.

    Why?
    I’ve seen many users struggle with use cases like this. For example, in Unity one cannot open new Nautilus windows by simply clicking on the Nautilus icon like in old days, since in Unity that just brings the focus to the already open single Nautilus window. People also have problems finding where Firefox/Chrome saved the files they just downloaded, and those are not visible in the “Recent files” group, since they where not launched via Nautilus.

    I’m not saying that the old way was good, I simply suggest you use the test case above in usability testing to see what creative ways people use to accomplish them and then you could try design something new or adapt something old that supports the optimal work flow.

  200. MattiK says: (permalink)
    August 24th, 2011 at 9:04 pm

    @yman:

    “All apps should be installed in /opt/”

    /opt is only for add-on software: http://www.pathname.com/fhs/2.2/fhs-3.12.html

    Many applications belongs to OS distribution and /opt is not for them.

  201. francesco44 says: (permalink)
    August 24th, 2011 at 9:44 pm

    Dear Mark,

    We all love you for what you have done…..till 10 month ago. Gnome 2 desktop was perfect for most of us. Very simple and very reliable. Unity requires more powerful computers, more mouse clicks, more brain juice….I can understand you were anxious to try something new. But many of us are too young, or too old or too busy to play the Unity game. We have to postpone that experience because we have some very urgent work to do (I work on climate change models personnally,). May be you wil find your way after one year of Unity experience…But maybe you will fail.

    So please secure the Classic Ubuntu the way you like…but secure it. We all know that we can go with Xubuntu, or Lubuntu, or Mint….etc…But we have confidence in Ubuntu…..so why not integrate in the distros of Ubuntu XFCE or LXDE….with the help of Xubuntu and Lubuntu…I think the times has come for a “wider” Kernel including all the functionalities of Ubuntu….with different flavors of desktops. It seems to me a much more moder approach, now, than multiplicating the children distros of the Buntu family. It will be more secure…more cooperative…for everyone. It will suit more cultural backgrounds. are you sure that Unity is not idiosyncratic, Will it work for Africans people of the East or the West, for Chinese of the North or the South, for American Indians, Telugu folks, Inuits guys…The experience with classic desktop….is so wide that we know it is transcultural. Concerning the future of the desktop it seems to me that there is other concept worth exploring…like the Grid of Fusion Garage…

    Therefore the right concept is more to have an “extended kernel” with the possibility of connecting seamless desktop.

    Love to you Mark and to all the Ubuntu family. Hope you listen to the differing voices of the non-lovers of Unity (at least 30% of the Ubuntu afficionados)

  202. Ubuntu Oneiric gets makeover | Install Ubuntu says: (permalink)
    August 24th, 2011 at 10:36 pm

    [...] a recent blog post Canonical chief Mark Shuttleworth outlined some of these [...]

  203. Joshua says: (permalink)
    August 25th, 2011 at 12:06 am

    I admire the fact that ubuntu’s developers have stuck to their vision and moved forward with this change. Anybody using the “classic” interface: I challenge you to keep an open mind and give this change a chance. Progress is about positive and logical changes. We tend to reject the new because we are used to the old without considering that it might be better.

    Great leaders know when to stick to their ideals and when to listen to feedback and can combine those to achieve their vision.

  204. matti says: (permalink)
    August 25th, 2011 at 2:54 am

    There are five points I’d like to bring up.

    I convert a lot of people from Windows to Ubuntu, for free, just because…

    1. I get away with few minutes of training going to a Gnome2/Classic interface. It stretches to two hours with Unity. Something is wrong in the usability assumptions. And obviously the number of people I am able to help/convert is dropping down dramatically. Your mileage may vary. Just the way it is. Excuse me if I feel disappointed. Congratulations, you have actually changed my life, to the worse.

    2. Many of my converts are seniors and/or suffer from various degrees of physical challenges and limitations. Introducing Unity to them means increasing their discomfort and pain level as it requires substantially increasing typing and coordination of the mouse and the keyboard. Mousing through menus and shortcuts on desktop was, concise, unambiguous and quick. To those users, Unity is far from an improvement. What happened to accessibility? Should you not consider including a mousable menu only option for navigation for handicapped?

    3. Everything we do is a process. We have computers to take care of “activities”. We worry about “paper/document flow”. Unity forces us to go back to the old model of thinking “Which program should I use to edit my pictures” instead of “Here is a picture I worked on yesterday, I want to work on it…” Click… and the right program comes up. The documents I am working on or that are waiting for me with high priority at any given time, reside on my desktop. If I for some unexplicable reason want to use some other program than the default, the right click context menu shows what is available, without a search engine. The process has worked for me and countless others through many different operating systems since the appearance of the first IBM PC. Apparently we have been both doing and teaching it all wrong, totally counter productively and we now need a search engine to show the errors of our ways? I’m sorry if I misinterpreted “Freedom to work the way you want to” but I can no longer find that choice available to me. Where is it? Why was it so wrong to have the important-to-you stuff directly accessible from the desktop without a search engine?

    4. Why was it so important to make my 2×23″ displays to look like a giant, poor imitation of an iPhone? Even if they were both touch screens, I would never be able to work that range from my seat. The constant need to move from the left edge to right edge is driving me nuts. That’s not a tablet by any stretch of imagination. It deserves a different interface, tuned to that hardware.

    5. Imagine, Mark, if the pilot of the Space Shuttle would only have available the Cessna 248 Controls? No, it would make no sense to him either.

  205. burjans says: (permalink)
    August 25th, 2011 at 4:02 pm

    Can Ubuntu become a rolling release?

    I’ve been thinking and I’m sure, but to say yes is not a plausible argument, so that I will try to explain.

    Anyone who are following updates oneiric, should agree with me and to know what I speak exactly, exist updates on the system every day, in every way, showing hard work and tirelessly to deliver a nice distribution, stable and fully functional

    Not worth raising an idea without a proposal, so here goes as I would.

    1 – Change of names: -

    - Occur only in the LTS, this would assume that would be 12.04 and the development version called 10.10. 11.04, 11.10 but with the same name

    2 – Two branches one distribution

    - The class gave us Clem, creating a branch changing, unpredictable and stormy (incoming) and a stable branch (latest)

    Example of the stable version:

    Main Ubuntu Repos ######
    deb http://us.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ lucid main

    Example of rolling release version:

    Main Ubuntu Repos ######
    deb http://us.archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ lucid main
    http://ppa.launchpad.net/ubuntu-daily/ppa/ubuntu lucid main deb

    3 – Delivery of ISOs images

    - Now considered as stable versions would be updated images of the branch rolling release, delivery would be every 6 months. Important updates stable branch (10.04.x)

    In the end, should always be possible to upgrade from one LTS version to another

    Well, I am not worker of Canonical … What do you think about the idea?

    http://www.com-sl.org/puede-ubuntu-convertirse-en-rolling-release.html

  206. yman says: (permalink)
    August 25th, 2011 at 4:47 pm

    @MattiK
    I already knew that, but the inconsistency is annoying. Plus, I think there is a difference between the base system and the default app. The base system would be stuff like the desktop shell, basic configuration utilities, CLI utilities, the file manager, the display manager, the USC etc. Stuff like the default web browser, default office suite, default games, and all other stuff that doesn’t feel like an essential piece of software for the system to be operational, or that is broadly perceived as something that can be replaced by the user according to his preferences should go in opt.

  207. MattiK says: (permalink)
    August 25th, 2011 at 10:15 pm

    @yman:

    There is no inconsistency on that. /opt is for add-on’s. File managers, desktop shells etc. can also replaced or left out.

    In fact, file system hierarchy is very consistent. The real problem is user interface fragmentation. Applications have fragmented look & feel, and Unity, these new scrollbars etc. only make it worse. Another fragmentancy is under the hood: Applications uses different runtime libraries and languages. I DO support developer freedom but the base system and default applications should be more consistent. These should use same compiled language, same intepreted language, same widget toolkit and have consistent look & feel based on some UI guideline documentation.

    In addition for that, there should not be too big changes that can’t be fully implemented before the LTS release. Example these new scrollbars should be implemented all software, and notifyOSD should be implemented all applications.. These are big changes, and it should be decided what applications are maintained for consistent look & feel and implementation and whitch are not, and mark them on repository.

  208. francesco44 says: (permalink)
    August 25th, 2011 at 10:59 pm

    Dear Mark, Dear all

    I didn’t knew that what I suggested in my previous post: install of Lubuntu Desktop on the top of an already installed version of Ubuntu was in fact very easy.

    This is explaine in french on the doc-page in § 3.3:
    http://doc.ubuntu-fr.org/lubuntu

    After this install you just have to choose “Lubuntu Desktom” at the beginning of your usual login session (GDM)

    This works perfectly…and Lubuntu is fast (faster than Gnome) and very convenient…Therefoe there seems to be no problem to “bypass” Unity…

    I hope this works also for more recent versions like 11.04, 11.10….

    With the risk of shocking Mark…who certainly wants to direct people on Unity…I suggest that this should be institutionalized, for the people reluctant to use Unity…

    Hope this helps

  209. 当麻 says: (permalink)
    August 26th, 2011 at 8:23 am

    Nice. But that reminds me … could you attend to important things? Am I interested in your constant trial & error of revamping the user interface? No, but I’d be very much interested to have hardware accelerated video decoding working with my preciously rare Intel GMA 4500 MHD graphics chip. Oh yeah, that IS Intel’s turf. Then how about giving them an incentive to finally get it done? It’s 2011.

  210. Jon says: (permalink)
    August 26th, 2011 at 8:43 am

    Interesting to learn that there is also internal debate between Unity 3D and QML. Following development it always seemed as if there was a bit too much duplication. Considering that 3D support in QT is only going to improve it seems to me that QML is more attractive. It would certainly offer much less of a barrier to entry to new developers (GL is quite a beast to get your head around). And to follow on the game analogy, even in games there is a trend to abstract away from the low level GL and write most of the fun stuff in higher level languages.

  211. mark says: (permalink)
    August 26th, 2011 at 9:25 am

    @Stuart

    Scrollbars are “stuck in the middle”; too thin to use with a touch interface, too big if their primary purpose is to tell you where you are. The overlay scrollbars are great if you mainly scroll with a scrollwheel, multi-touch trackpad (“two-finger scroll”) or directly on a touch screen, and in the desktop case they preserve enough of the mouse interaction to be generally useful there too. It’s like most things, a compromise, and we chose to emphasise where we think the future lies rather than the past.

  212. My Bookmarks » Window Controls For Maximized Windows Hidden By Default, More Updates [Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot] says: (permalink)
    August 26th, 2011 at 9:34 am

    [...] more polish for Dash which finally looks like in Mark Shuttleworth’s screenshot. [...]

  213. MattiK says: (permalink)
    August 26th, 2011 at 11:39 am

    @Francis Bolduc:

    “But now, with 11.11, they have no choice. They must adapt.”

    Yes they have. Switch Ubuntu to other OS. I was reading Wikimedia usage statistics today and Ubuntu lost users 28% very short time. Reason is probably Unity.

    This is good example that six month cycle releases should be market as developer releases. Pushing unfinished software to non-technical end users is very harmful to Ubuntu.

    User disappointment is difficult to fix and today, mainstream software are generally good quality. Crashing, bugs, wierd error messages, poor exception handling (about everything should be failure transparent or rollback), missing documentation, UI fragmentation, non-responsive applications do not meet users expectations today. These kind of issues are more common in six month cycle releases.

    @Mark:

    “Scrollbars are “stuck in the middle”; too thin to use with a touch interface, too big if their primary purpose is to tell you where you are. The overlay scrollbars are great if you mainly scroll with a scrollwheel, multi-touch trackpad (“two-finger scroll”) or directly on a touch screen, and in the desktop case they preserve enough of the mouse interaction to be generally useful there too. It’s like most things, a compromise, and we chose to emphasise where we think the future lies rather than the past.”

    I agree. However, these are big changes that should be pushed one release cycle and ~all applications. Firstly, UI fragmentation is worse than non-ideal UI. Secondly, it attract developers to make applications directly to the use these features, and not afterwards.

    I’m afraid that Ayatana developments bite too much too quickly, and that adds UI fragmentation and some “ecosystem sickness”. Example Qt applications still have different UI theme than GTK+ applications, so why adding UI fragmentation earlier than the previous UI problems have been corrected?

  214. Jian H. L. says: (permalink)
    August 26th, 2011 at 12:08 pm

    Seen some 11.10 pics on omgubuntu. That is great improvement from 11.04. The blank area for application / window title on top panel WAS ugly! This is why turned to Fedora 15, it’s not beautiful but also not so UGLY. On Macs the full screen maximized window covers the top panel. So, IMHO, Ubuntu 11.10 is better than Mac on this point. I’ll make and update my Ubuntu Live USB when 11.10 is released.

    Can this be better:
    -Don’t show application / window title on top panel at the left when an application window is not full screen maximized;
    You can show a tiny fixed Ubuntu logo button there at this condition;
    -For the not full screen maximized windows, make the current / focused one can be more easily distinguished

  215. Jian H. L. says: (permalink)
    August 26th, 2011 at 12:15 pm

    I use my 60G portable hard disk on Fedora 15 release version. It crashes & panic when I do safely removal. Ubuntu 11.04 doesn’t do this.

  216. Jian H. L. says: (permalink)
    August 26th, 2011 at 12:28 pm

    Why so many Lubuntu, Kubuntu? You should cancel those and focus on the only One Ubuntu.

  217. Window Controls For Maximized Windows Hidden By Default, More Updates [Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot] « Ubuntu Tutorials « 123linux tutorials says: (permalink)
    August 26th, 2011 at 12:46 pm

    [...] more polish for Dash which finally looks like in Mark Shuttleworth’s screenshot. [...]

  218. Arick says: (permalink)
    August 26th, 2011 at 4:37 pm

    Mark,

    Many, many comments here. In my opinion, some are on target, some are not. People will always have their own views of things and people are creatures of habit.

    My 5-cents worth:

    a. Unity: hated it at first. Made myself give it a fair test (same as I did for linux… and if I hadn’t been open minded in that regard… I would still be M$ Windows based). After about two weeks of use, I found unity likable. I did have to tweak it to my tastes (compiz). There are areas I would improve:

    >> Why so many clicks to browse things? I would like to option of turning off the “recommended” or of having all programs show without the extra click required.

    >> I really want to customize what icons are shown when I first bring up unity. I like having favorites listed that I select (Mint Menu for example).

    b. I like where unity is going in general. I am glad to see that you are working to make more space at the top and while it is not ideal to move the launch button away, something had to give. I look forward to giving it a try.

    c. Transparency / Blur. I want to make that go away and I really hope it is possible to customize the unity menu to smoke without blur. I, as many do, think that the blur is too “busy” on the eyes and makes finding things more difficult.

    d. Would love a good utility to edit the right click menu options for launchers. Quick Lists I think they are called.

    e. NOT a Unity Comment; however, LibreOffice has got to improve and be more integrated. It is taking steps, but frankly, the lack of a NATIVE VERSION of Microsoft Office for Linux is the biggest block to most people I interact with adopting Ubuntu. I actually have to run a copy in wine for comparability — especially with PowerPoint. LibreOffice is fine if you aren’t having to work with and edit other office application documents and share back and forth. Something is always lost. Ultimately, this is the MAIN stumbling block to widespread adoption. Apple has it for Mac… so it is totally possible. Can you make it happen? <>

    GREAT WORK. I do applaud you for stepping out to make a difference and I think presenting a consistent interface for new linuxers is important. Many will learn that Linux is not just limited to one or the other and they are free to install other Desktop Environs.

    v/r
    A

  219. Arick says: (permalink)
    August 26th, 2011 at 4:40 pm

    AFTER THOUGHT:

    Have you considered presenting users with a choice of Desktop Environment to install? A menu that provide choice for Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu, etc…? Coupled with information and screenshots of each could enable a person to pick what they know best or think will feel most comfortable with.

    Looking forward to 11.10 and UNITY! :)

  220. Martin says: (permalink)
    August 26th, 2011 at 6:12 pm

    @Jannis: So interesting to see your comments here. I just switched to Xubuntu because of Unity. Oh the irony!

  221. Ubuntu: el dash añade controles de ventana y filtros, y el Centro de Software ya es compatible con GTK3 says: (permalink)
    August 26th, 2011 at 6:32 pm

    [...] Blog de Mark Shuttleworth Tags: Oneiric Ocelot, [...]

  222. Pensamento Positivo says: (permalink)
    August 26th, 2011 at 8:32 pm

    Good evening Mark! As matti, I want to talk a bit about accessibility for the disabled people in Operative Systems. Some years ago, when I had to buy a computer, as a near blind who need just a full screen magnifier, like current Compiz enhanced zoom effect or Orca Magnification feature, I just bought the computer, start magnifier and few minutes after I could work properly, no matter what OS should be, Windows, Mac or more recently Linux since Magnifiers became sufficiently good.

    But with the boom of OS X, Windows Vista / 7, and now Unity / Gnome 3 / KDE 4 linux distros, things became very different. To have an Idea, no matter what Operative System should be, I need no more than an entire evening to get confortable to work. Get rid of transparencies, get rid of semi-transparent thumbnails, tweak folder options, get rid of “dinamic” (or even overlay) elements that hide and appear as the mouse goes near, modify ususable themes, change font and sometimes icons size, get rid of some 3D Effects, Fix some applications behaviour… Uff!… Don’t worry me, but where is accessibility for the disabled for current Operative Systems developers?

    And just one more question: Will Ubuntu 11.10 have a good Full Screen Magnifier and lot more accessibility tools ant what are they?

    Have a good evening!

  223. Andrew Myers says: (permalink)
    August 27th, 2011 at 4:51 am

    Unity is growing on me, especially now I’m learning to keyboard shortcuts.

    In fact, I’ve actually migrated from Fedora to Ubuntu, as I prefer Unity to Gnome 3 for some reason (which I can’t really put my finger on – the fact there is a 2D version is part of the equation I think).

    My main issue is that I find the System Key (Windows Key) somewhat difficult to use comfortably – if you touch type it’s awkward to use with your left thumb, without physically moving your whole hand which soft of defeats the purpose of using keyboard shortcuts IMHO.

    The “ring” finger of the left hand is the logical finger to use with it, but then if you want to use commands like “System -> 1″ & “System -> W”, you then need to physically move your right hand over to the left hand side of the keyboard.

    For mine, this is my major problem with both unity and Gnome 3 keyboard shortcuts. Has anyone managed to set up a more productive set of shortcuts?

  224. MattiK says: (permalink)
    August 27th, 2011 at 9:44 am

    @Arick;

    “It is taking steps, but frankly, the lack of a NATIVE VERSION of Microsoft Office for Linux is the biggest block to most people I interact with adopting Ubuntu.”

    I don’t see that a problem at all.

    “LibreOffice is fine if you aren’t having to work with and edit other office application documents and share back and forth.”

    I configure every MS Office and LibreOffce installation to use same document formats. ODF 1.1 everywhere execpt spreadsheets where I use MS Office 2007 OOXML.

    However, I appreciate it if this http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?id=26794 is added to test suites.

  225. 6205 says: (permalink)
    August 27th, 2011 at 10:08 am

    That render looks nice and professional. My complains:

    1./ Hidden application menu is bad decission. It’s not easy discoverable and now are hidden also window buttons.
    2./ Dash maximize button in right bottom corner was good and nice. Current buttons in top left should be not there. This is not a window. It’s overlay.
    3./ Blur should be enabled also on dash borders
    4./ Small white triangle pointing on the dash icons on the bottom (home, documents, files etc..)should be pointing out from the bottom, not from the top. They could be also embeded into thick dash outline, like was dash maximize button in Natty.

  226. 6205 says: (permalink)
    August 27th, 2011 at 10:23 am

    One more thing… :)

    5./ When Refine search is open in this case should be scrollbar moved to the left side, closer to dash results, because refine search button cannot scroll and it looks weird…

  227. Lilian says: (permalink)
    August 27th, 2011 at 10:35 am

    I was searching all over the web for “Feedback for Ubuntu” and “Feedback for Unity” and found nothing, so, I came here…

    I wanted to say 1 think, I think Ubuntu with Unity will be always considered as in Alpha mode until it will make all default apps to work with the Global Menu. When u open LibreOffice u have that glitch that makes u always think that this product is not ready yet. There is a plug-in for LibreOffice to work with the Global Menu, why not pre-install it?

  228. 6205 says: (permalink)
    August 27th, 2011 at 11:35 am

    6./ Uhm… about that virtual dektop switcher… IMO it should be loking the same like new lenses or ubuntu buttons. Little curved like old CRT :) And maybe you could apply that also on trash

  229. catalin says: (permalink)
    August 27th, 2011 at 6:45 pm

    My PC configuration next CPU Celeron 3.06, 1gb ram ddr 1, 64-bit nviadia

    I know if I can run ubuntu with gnome 3, reasonably?

    I made ​​an update to ubuntu 11.04 for 11.10 with Alt + F2 command update-manager-d, but after installing the system opens and goes reasonably well, but after next restart no longer open, we repeated the procedure four times same thing happened to me.

    Excuse my English

    I hope I have made understandable

  230. Kenny Strawn says: (permalink)
    August 27th, 2011 at 7:17 pm

    I personally like the new Oneiric Unity layout, but that doesn’t come at the expense of bugs that plague the release (such as the Jockey crash that leaves me with no Internet connection).

    With that said, love the Dash transparency, love the “holographic” Indicators, and love the tablet-style look.

  231. Unity 11.10 prende forma… ma quella sbagliata | WebEnt says: (permalink)
    August 27th, 2011 at 9:49 pm

    [...] giorno fa l’astronauta ha aggiornato il suo blog, felice di raccontarci i cambiamenti che stanno avvenendo in Unity. Compreso uno [...]

  232. nabz says: (permalink)
    August 27th, 2011 at 9:49 pm

    Mark,

    Some of us have big screens. Some of us do NOT want to turn them into 30+” smartphones. If I wanted to use Windows or OSX, I would use them; please stop aping their UIs. IMHO Unity is an abomination (and I’m not the only one to think so).

    I’m a power-user and have been faithful to Ubuntu since Hardy. Ever since Natty, however, I have jumped ship to Xubuntu, and, sadly, am fairly regularly looking at non-Ubuntu-based distros. If you ever wondered about very effective ways of alienating your faithful userbase, this is one of them.

  233. Arick says: (permalink)
    August 27th, 2011 at 10:08 pm

    @MattiK :

    I will check out the link you provided. I am in a work environment where I don’t control the formats of others. Unfortunately, in the large organization I work with, everything is done with MS Office and everyone uses the new formats now. I am a big proponent of the ODF formats and push using that. I even use the formats myself at home. Can’t control the others though. My comment about a native office is there because I really find that to be the biggest obstacle for people that I interact with adopting linux. wrong blog post for this discussion. :)

  234. Omer Akram says: (permalink)
    August 27th, 2011 at 10:54 pm

    @6205

    In case you are not aware Launchpad is the place to report bugs not this blog.

  235. Guillaume says: (permalink)
    August 28th, 2011 at 1:12 am

    This is so cool, and I hope compiz performances will be better ;) Keep it up mark, Ubuntu will win the OS war!

  236. digitalkaese says: (permalink)
    August 28th, 2011 at 2:12 am

    Needs more hidden features:

    1. introduce global window buttons for unmaximized windows
    2. hide them in the upper left corner
    3. make window titlebar hidden by default, visible on mouseover
    4. hide something else
    5. rename it to “Ubuntu 12.04 Unity Easter Eggtop”
    6. win!

    …just kidding of course. I am happy there is a chance the hidden menu issue will be adressed. :)

  237. yman says: (permalink)
    August 28th, 2011 at 3:38 am

    @MattiK:
    I’m saying things should be the same for all apps, regardless of licensing, price, or the availability of source code. I don’t understand what you are trying to say, what with you contradicting me and saying that apps should be installed the current way, then saying even stuff like the desktop shell are replaceable, and therefor should also go in opt. Of course any component is replaceable, including the kernel, and perhaps they should all be in opt, but if we don’t put everything in opt, then at least the stuff the user sees as being an “app” and not an integral part of the system should go in there. If you want to put more than that, that’s fine by me, but at least if apps are put in there then, as I said, they should be put there irrespective of licensing, price, or source code. If Braid goes in opt, so should Wesnoth, etc. If Darwinia is managed and posted in the USC via the MyApps portal, so should Chromium.

  238. yman says: (permalink)
    August 28th, 2011 at 3:50 am

    @mark
    The ovelay scrollbars should appear directly beneath the mouse, so I don’t have to move the mouse to the position indicator, stop, wait for the overlay scrollbars to appear, then move the mouse where they are, but instead move the mouse to the position indicator and immediately interact with the overlay scrollbars as if they were there all along. That is the behavior I expect, and I keep being surprised at how annoying they currently are to interact with.

  239. MattiK says: (permalink)
    August 28th, 2011 at 7:46 am

    @yman:

    “I don’t understand what you are trying to say, what with you contradicting me and saying that apps should be installed the current way, then saying even stuff like the desktop shell are replaceable, and therefor should also go in opt. Of course any component is replaceable, including the kernel, and perhaps they should all be in opt, but if we don’t put everything in opt, then at least the stuff the user sees as being an “app” and not an integral part of the system should go in there.”

    I try to say that everything in Ubuntu repository is integral part of the system. It doesn’t matter what user see, because user don’t have to use other folders than own home folder.

  240. yman says: (permalink)
    August 28th, 2011 at 3:36 pm

    @MattiK:
    Now that we have the USC, which uses the concept of “apps” and the MyApps portal I think apps are going to move away from being an “integral part of the system”. I think they never were to begin with. They were just merely hosted by Ubuntu, and were not a part of it, but we’re going to see a move away from that, at least in the conceptual sense, as app developers use the MyApps portal to upload their own apps instead of relying on Canonical or the community to do it for them. This will especially hold true if the USC gains support for donations, and then especially if the donation system is nothing more than the existing payment system, but with a disconnect between payment and installation, in which case the developers will want to make sure they get the money by uploading the app themselves. This will take a huge burden off of the community and Canonical who will, over time, see the the need to package other people’s software decrease.

  241. Jian H. L. says: (permalink)
    August 28th, 2011 at 5:02 pm

    There’s still Blank Title Area on top panel for 11.10. This is super ugly. I think your 11.10 has already failed. There’s no need and no reason for that version. Maybe you don’t have the taste to make things good and it’s just to hard for you.

    Fedora 15 and Gnome 3 is not colorful and it’s not that ugly. So what do you think you can be better than Fedora???

  242. mlu says: (permalink)
    August 29th, 2011 at 9:29 am

    Unity is a great interface. But i think the following things should be done to create an added value for ubuntu:

    1) Marketing: There should be a high end hardware, designed for ubuntu. This is necessary for marketing the whole project. I want to show the people that ubuntu runs on a high end machine, which is well designed and pretty damn fast. I think the price of the hardware is not necessary in this case. On the contrary, i will show the people that i can buy everything (e.g. a Mac-Family products) and i use as operating system ubuntu, because its the best OS of all. If i only show ubuntu on old, slow or cheap hardware, not all the the people believe me that ubuntu is the best OS. Ubuntu (unity) is well designed, trendy, pretty well looking and the hardware should it too. I think with this strategy you (we) can reach the keynote…

    2) More specific: The hidden application menu is very risky. Usability guideline says: A user should always see the most frequently actions that are carried out. Its also not very touch-device-friendly => You must touch twice to close/minimize/maximize a window.

    3) The shown lines on dash should be more than one line for each content. Either customizable on system or automatically depended on resolution. So the user could spare a click in such cases.

  243. Like I dunno maybe dishwashing or f**ing flipping fries says: (permalink)
    August 29th, 2011 at 11:17 am

    @ mlu
    Have you tried installing Ubuntu on apple products? I’m running Debian on a mac mini. Being a close relation of Debian, I don’t see why you wouldn’t be able to run Ubuntu on apple products too :)

  244. Joe Linux says: (permalink)
    August 29th, 2011 at 3:17 pm

    When I heard “Scopes,” I immediately thought of the Tennessee Monkey Trail. Whether of not these changes represent actual improvement is hard to say. I can’t tell from simply looking at a picture.

    I know I would rather have a clear menu system than a search engine. I hated the original “wiper” on what I call the Exodus Desktop. Is the annoying wiper still there? I think the less mouse clicks or taps on the screen the better. I recently got my first Android device and find the Android interface to be very clumsy too. I do agree with the idea of trying to unify the look and feel, and operation of smart phones into a common user interface to be a valid goal. The problem with the Android interface are several, but paramount seems to be that there is no clear and simple way to close running applications. This could easily have been incorporated into the Android wiper, but for some reason wasn’t. Another problem is that each individual application has no real commonality of user interface and once again there is often no clear way to end or close a program.

    Obviously Mark is an extraordinarily intelligent individual with a very long term view. I feel any User Interface environment has to give a the user a quick overview of the system at a glance. Basic controls such as opening and closing programs need clear consistency in regards to the interface. If there is going to be a wiper, then maybe it should actually be like the notification bar in Android that completely pulls down, but it should be better in terms of offering more complete information to the user in regards to what is running and a way to quickly shut it off. Developers of individual programs will need to comply with the “rules of system interface” so the end user actually does have a unifying experience.

  245. MattiK says: (permalink)
    August 29th, 2011 at 4:24 pm

    @Joe Linux:

    “Developers of individual programs will need to comply with the “rules of system interface” so the end user actually does have a unifying experience.”

    Not gonna happen in Ubuntu. Ayatana components are GPL licensed and non-standard, which prevents them using in proprietary software. There are business and technical reasons why all software can not be open sourced.

  246. Nick says: (permalink)
    August 29th, 2011 at 6:33 pm

    The more I experience GNOME 3, the more burdens I find. The latest is learning I now have to hold the CTRL-key while pressing the DELETE-key to move something to the Trash Can. It’s crap like this that is a step backwards. I mean, Come On! What’s the point of requiring this? DELETE has always moved stuff to the trash. SHIFT-DELETE bypasses the trash and deletes it permanently. This method has zero issues. Why change it?

    Everything I see coming from Ubuntu/Canonical is top notch. These latest improvements to Unity are evidence of this. They are smart and facilitate ease of use on the desktop while adding an exciting interface. Stuff like Unity is advancing the Linux Desktop. I can’t say the same for GNOME 3.

    I’d like to see Ubuntu make it’s own desktop and not have to rely on GNOME anymore.

  247. Joe Linux says: (permalink)
    August 29th, 2011 at 7:16 pm

    @MattiK:

    “Not gonna happen in Ubuntu. Ayatana components are GPL licensed and non-standard, which prevents them using in proprietary software. There are business and technical reasons why all software can not be open sourced.”

    I don’t understand what open or closed source has to do with a unifying experience. I don’t know if all Android Apps are open source or not. One thing is for sure, many have a price tag associated with them. Unfortunately many do no have a common approach to the menu key menu. It does pop up but then many to not have a clear exit or end the program option. In my opinion they all applications should stay in operation until clearly given the signal to quit.

    As for the Unity Interface, What I have seen just plain clumsy and not an improvement from the past. “Unity” tends to be very confusing and requires more mouse movement and more mouse clicks than in the past. That in no way can be considered elegant. Ubuntu can go ahead and make it more Android like, but it should be better than the Android interface not worse. Wipers that are hard to control are a much less than ideal approach to the issue. At least the Android wipers only come out when the user wants them.

  248. MattiK says: (permalink)
    August 29th, 2011 at 8:55 pm

    @Joe Linux:

    “I don’t understand what open or closed source has to do with a unifying experience.”

    Ubuntu uses Ayatana libraries to improve usability and to provide Ubuntu’s own user experience. These cannot be used in closed source software.

  249. Joe Linux says: (permalink)
    August 29th, 2011 at 9:23 pm

    @MattiK:

    “Ubuntu uses Ayatana libraries to improve usability and to provide Ubuntu’s own user experience. These cannot be used in closed source software.”

    How much closed source software is used on Ubuntu Systems? I think I probably run some multimedia codecs and so forth, but I don’t think I’m running anything proprietary that actually has much of a user interface. The fact is Unity seems to emulate Android in certain respects, and the Android interface is far from perfect. Android doesn’t have a nicely organized applications menu. Rather the approach it to page through 100′s of icons. Of course you can set your favorites to page one. But all in all the Android system is very wanting, so the end used needs to have an excess of small apps, all with their own icon,to do what the operating system should do. It seems the concept behind Unity is something on the order of Anderoid’s “Apps Brain.” While Android has a few nice features, Gnome 2 is by far the more user friendly user interface.

  250. Kenny Strawn says: (permalink)
    August 30th, 2011 at 3:09 am

    Unity is meant to be for the novice user, and it’s a shame you commenters (other than Mark) don’t see it. Novice users like to leave UI elements where they are and not move them. Novice users like to be able to use an OS interchangeably without having to install a different user interface. Novice users also like it where there’s eye candy, whether power users like it or not.

    I agree with Jack Wallen of Tech Republic here: In his article “Linux desktop progress: Innovation vs. power-user backlash”, he makes a point that the novice user doesn’t care whether the UI is “dumbed down” or not (and Unity at least does allow more fine-tuning via CCSM, not to mention allows icons to be placed on the desktop and also doesn’t require you to enter an “Overview” to launch your favorite apps, all unlike GNOME Shell) or that they have to go through several clicks to launch an application or not (which, if the applications and Dash are pinned to the Launcher, they don’t have to).

    You guys can go on ranting about change in the Linux desktop, but that makes you guys no different than those Windows XP users who still use an OS from 2001 and still fear getting new PCs out of pure irrational fear of change, even if it is positive change. Face it, that irrational fear is for immature people, not mature people.

  251. MattiK says: (permalink)
    August 30th, 2011 at 8:27 am

    @Joe Linux:

    “How much closed source software is used on Ubuntu Systems?”

    I use Skype, Cŕashplan, Flash Player, Zimbra, Spotify and some games. And closed source software on Ubuntu is increasing everywhere.

  252. LGB says: (permalink)
    August 30th, 2011 at 4:02 pm

    @Markus: I have never understood this attitude. You say “what community says”. But are you the community? Or how do you know what community wants? Reading comments on blog/articles (like Mark’s too) is not so correct way to judge this. First, you can read positive comments too, so I can’t say that _everybody_ (“the community”) says that the design is totally wrong (just because some guys say it is – others say it’s great). Second: do not forget about the “target” of the ubuntu desktop. Most users won’t read blogs/articles like this, so they won’t comment or explain their opinion, ever. In my opinion most people (like my father) are simply not interested in reading news about ubuntu development, they only use ubuntu as a “tool” (as you can use a hammer without being interested on designing/producing hammers). So if Canonical really did some research among “average users”, it should be more correct way to analyze the need of the average user, as most people here (commenting) may have more knowledge than the average. Thus, I (we) can use other DEs (like xfce) we can customize the system, etc. But the “default design/install” is about the needs of the people who can’t do this, or not even interested to do that. Somehow this fact is often forgotten … And I really can’t understand people who seems to know a lot (compared to an “average” user) about the system but still, they are the most noisy ones shouting that their taste of desktop should/must be the default. It’s a logical inconsistency as far as I can see the situation.

    Personally I don’t like Unity, it’s not my taste. But it’s not a reason to complain all the time, because I am not a typical user, and I have the knowledge to install/use/customize/etc the system, while others not: so they need should be the more important thing to handle as the “default” one.

  253. Daniel says: (permalink)
    August 30th, 2011 at 5:18 pm

    Good job Mark. Unity is getting better.

    I’ve made a mockup evolution of Unity interface based on your design. Check it if you want: http://goo.gl/XhlUr

  254. Kenny Strawn says: (permalink)
    August 31st, 2011 at 6:02 am

    I also have to say that the way the Ubuntu button is placed in 11.10 definitely is an improvement over the way it is placed in 11.04.

    To explain that further, I use Google Chrome. Most of my Chrome apps (on Ubuntu of course) are on the New Tab Page, but there are a few (i.e. Google+) that aren’t available (officially) in the Chrome Web Store, so I have to pin them to my tab strip (Of course, Google+ is the only one that is pinned at the moment, but I may do it with other apps as well). Well, it just so happens that, because Google+ is the only one that is pinned, it ends up being placed right below the Ubuntu button in 11.04, so I sometimes end up either clicking the Ubuntu button or un-autohiding the Launcher when I mean to click the pinned tab.

    Thank you, Mark, for fixing this problem in 11.10, and I am downloading a newer Daily ISO to test a fix for Bug 689323 at the moment. If it happens to work, I will install 11.10 and enjoy it!

  255. Otus says: (permalink)
    August 31st, 2011 at 10:08 am

    “We have time to refine the behaviour of this based on user testing of the betas; for example, in one view, one should be able to close successive windows from that top left corner even if they are not maximised.”

    If this is going to be the norm in how Ubuntu is developed, you should just go ahead and remove the concept of User Interface Freeze from the release schedule.

  256. Joe Linux says: (permalink)
    August 31st, 2011 at 2:47 pm

    My question to Kenny Strawn is, “Why is Unity so friggin’ hard to use and understand?” Why does it require more mouse clicks and more mouse movements? Why is it necessary to have a cheat sheet to find the hidden key commands? How is it that the lack of a clear and easy to use menu system is somehow considered user friendly? We critics aren’t stuck in the past, we just like computer systems that are easy to use. After having suffered for a few weeks with the Android interface on alleged “smart phones,” I have come to the conclusion that some people just hate confusing “wipers;” particularly when they don’t offer adequate control over the system’s operation. As for MattiL’s list of closed source software, it seems to be a small string of red herrings that has little or nothing to do with a decent desktop interface.

  257. MattiK says: (permalink)
    August 31st, 2011 at 3:51 pm

    @Joe Linux:

    “As for MattiL’s list of closed source software, it seems to be a small string of red herrings that has little or nothing to do with a decent desktop interface.”

    My point was that it is impossible to get unified user experience to applications because there is license restrictions on Ubuntu’s Ayatana libraries.

  258. yman says: (permalink)
    August 31st, 2011 at 3:55 pm

    @Joe Linux
    If they would enable browsing in the Dash it would be perfect. Personally, I prefer to click on stuff in order to see what’s inside instead of hovering like in a menu, since I tend to slip and hover over the wrong thing when trying to click a menu item, thus accidentally changing the display. With clicking (like in a file browser, only for the Dash it should be a single click) I always get what I want, and keyboard navigation is faster as I can move on a 2D grid instead of a linear list, thus allowing me to take shortcuts. So the number of clicks isn’t the problem, the problem is how many layers of navigation do I have to go through. In the old menu system that would be:
    1. Open the Applications menu.
    2. Open the menu for the category I want.
    3. Open the application.

    In Unity in 11.10, if if had the kind of browsing I envision:
    1. Open the Dash.
    2. Open the Find Apps (or More Apps, or whatever it’s called) lens.
    3. Open the Category.
    4. Open the application.

    That would have been 1 extra step, but with the added security of never having to go back because of accidentally mousing over the wrong menu, thus possibly saving a whole lot of time, effort, and frustration in the long run. In 11.04 the Apps lens is in the launcher, so step 1 can be skipped, which would mean the same number of steps to get at an app. For people who have trouble clicking on stuff, such as those with carpel tunnel syndrome you can put an option to simulate a click on hover, if that isn’t already supported with the existing accessibility features. So the problem isn’t Unity itself, but the lack of support for browsing.

    Here’s the bug report I submitted on the issue:
    https://bugs.launchpad.net/unity/+bug/828177

  259. Joe Linux says: (permalink)
    September 1st, 2011 at 2:52 am

    @MattiK says:
    “My point was that it is impossible to get unified user experience to applications because there is license restrictions on Ubuntu’s Ayatana libraries.”

    Are these Ayatana libraries in any other Linux distributions other than Unbuntu and its spin offs? Is it that Ubuntu says to Skype, “You can’t use Ayatana libraries in Skype to provide a unified experience.”?

  260. Joe Linux says: (permalink)
    September 1st, 2011 at 3:07 am

    @yman says in his bug report on Unity:
    “The apps lens . . . [could] . . . . display a list of app categories instead of a disorganized mess which is the situation today. I sure hope you get this done before 12.04,”

    I agree that Unity is more of a disorganized mess than anything else. How would an end user know to type in “Lillypond” for music notation software? (And by the way, Lillypond doesn’t even have a graphical interface.) And would the Unity lense find it if it weren’t previously installed?

    I think your point about layers of navigation is a good one. That’s why the launcher icons on the panel or desktop is such a great idea, and should never be abandoned.

  261. MattiK says: (permalink)
    September 1st, 2011 at 7:30 am

    @Joe Linux:

    “Are these Ayatana libraries in any other Linux distributions other than Unbuntu and its spin offs?”

    Probably not, but in Ubuntu, these are required for unified Ubuntu user experience.

    “Is it that Ubuntu says to Skype, “You can’t use Ayatana libraries in Skype to provide a unified experience.”?”

    Ayatana libraries are GPL, and Skype folks know licenses. As long as Ayatana libraries are GPL and application must be closed, it is impossible to use these new scrollbars, notify OSD, application menu etc.

  262. Joe Linux says: (permalink)
    September 1st, 2011 at 2:42 pm

    @MattiK

    “Ayatana libraries are GPL, and Skype folks know licenses. As long as Ayatana libraries are GPL and application must be closed, it is impossible to use these new scrollbars, notify OSD, application menu etc.”

    Since this seems to preclude a unifying experience, what do you propose? Do you have a solution other than end users should suffer?

  263. zelrik says: (permalink)
    September 1st, 2011 at 4:05 pm

    Now that I think about it, I am no fan of this blurring, I don’t get the point of being able to see a blurry firefox on your screen. A suggestion would be to just show a wire frame of the applications under the panel to suggest their presence. Transparency is good but tough to do it right, you really need a matching background. This idea of color adjusting with the background is interesting though.

    For the position of the content, why not put the lenses/sources as 2 tight columns under the search bar? The results would appear on the right of the panel. That way the input part would stay on the left side, and the ‘output’ (the final action is to click on whatever icon you want) would appear on the right.
    The spacing between the icons is fairly large, not sure it needs to be that way, also, the labels need to be bigger/clearer.

  264. 003: WebOS Developers Looking to Microsoft | LinuxNewsPodcast says: (permalink)
    September 1st, 2011 at 5:09 pm

    [...] More Unity Desktop Confusion Coming in Ubuntu 11.10 http://www.markshuttleworth.com [...]

  265. yman says: (permalink)
    September 1st, 2011 at 6:50 pm

    IMO either there should be a stronger blurring effect or the underlying windows shouldn’t be shown at all.

  266. MattiK says: (permalink)
    September 1st, 2011 at 9:10 pm

    @Joe Linux:

    “Since this seems to preclude a unifying experience, what do you propose? Do you have a solution other than end users should suffer?”

    Ayatana libraries licensing can be changed to LGPL. Then these can be linked with closed source software.

    These should be of course stabilized for at least three LTS releases. It is unacceptable if user buy e.g. some game and that fails when user upgrades to next LTS. Games are excellent example for software where proprietary license can be advantage. It is a lot harder to cheat if you can’t see or edit source.

    I personally prefer open source licenses almost all software I use, and I require platform to be open. However, some situations closed source works fine. I really like to know what is behind in this Ayatana GPL licensing.

  267. Sashin says: (permalink)
    September 2nd, 2011 at 4:51 am

    Hmm… I can’t put my finger on it, but there’s something about this target render that looks much better than actual oneiric screenshots… http://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-rqAAoHny_pE/Tl6izfiet8I/AAAAAAAAF64/k3OknyrHtMQ/ubuntu11.10-applications-lens.png

    Oneiric looks great however though…

  268. Jian H. L. says: (permalink)
    September 2nd, 2011 at 4:57 am

    1. it’s still not consistent:

    When no window is selected – you click on the blank desktop / background, then move mouse to top panel. You see the blank space on the left of the top panel before the menu?

    Alternative: You can leave the window controls there and make them inactive. It’s better IMHO.

    2. it’s better to always turn menu on even you don’t move mouse onto top panel.

    3. after login, you can make the top panel transparent style as same as it on the login screen.

  269. MattiK says: (permalink)
    September 2nd, 2011 at 7:23 am

    @Joe Linux:

    Maybe reason why Ayatana libraries are GPL is because these are not ready yet to stabilize.

  270. Joe Linux says: (permalink)
    September 2nd, 2011 at 2:20 pm

    Has anyone suggested that it would be better to have a configurable panel bar that can be placed on the top, bottom, or side, in favor of an annoying wiper that keeps sliding in and out? Icons and Widgets could be added to the panel bar along with tabs that allow you to navigate from window to window, and see all your windows at a glance.

  271. Garry says: (permalink)
    September 3rd, 2011 at 9:03 am

    @Joe Linux “Has anyone suggested that it would be better to have a configurable panel bar that can be placed on the top, bottom, or side, in favor of an annoying wiper that keeps sliding in and out? Icons and Widgets could be added to the panel bar along with tabs that allow you to navigate from window to window, and see all your windows at a glance.”

    I think there are actually a few of those available now. If you Google it you’ll probably find one you can use – I’ve heard good things about LXDE. Clearly, though, Canonical have decided to invest their time, effort and money – which they’re entitled to do since it’s theirs – in another model. I prefer their approach to be honest, but to each their own.

  272. Gauthier says: (permalink)
    September 4th, 2011 at 3:04 pm

    So much debate around unity.. Mark you set a goal of 200 million users within 4/5 years, you already know that what the actual community want is not necessary what’s best for ubuntu. The goal is to attract new windows users, it’s not really about satisfying the old linux guard , hell they can switch flavors anytime they want!

    Windows users wants:

    A nice looking GUI, that looks cool and is intuitive. I don’t know why there seems to be a focus for touch screen in unity though, do you want to get desktop users or tablet users to switch? Chasing both seems a bit foolish..

    NO command lines to solve problems,, ex windows users don’t want to learn bash! You must be able to do/everything through GUI, or patches , or softwares..

    POPULAR GAMES that runs natively under linux, and yes i know about wine, crossever..Or if we have to keep wine for example, preload the wine settings in the launcher or something like this. Windows users wants to see one big file on their desktop, click, install and play. Couldn’t canonical port games? Isnt that the best way to bring money to ubuntu desktop?

    Skype and msn must be working perfectly.

    And that’s about it really! All the rest like open office, vlc, torrent client already exists and works perfectly. The target audience is people between 12 and 35 years who wants to look kewl and lulz about their friends running M$ , so yes, you have to dumb it down all the way for christ sake.

    Ubuntu created hope for linux future, if we cant have a mainstream distro that really allow what i’ve mentionned, linux will always be an OS that 3 out of 100 people use daily on their desktops.

    You have a great opportunity here Mark, i sincerely hope you succeed, and wish you all the best.

  273. First Look: Ubuntu 11.10 beta « MinOtaVrS WordPress Blog .. says: (permalink)
    September 5th, 2011 at 9:02 pm

    [...] ματιά αν μη τι άλλο εντυπωσιάζει και σίγουρα τα νέα χαρακτηριστικά του δεν θα περάσουν απαρατήρητα στους λάτρεις [...]

  274. malcolm says: (permalink)
    September 6th, 2011 at 2:35 pm

    Ah… finally something interesting!!!
    Scopes are data sources, and can tap into any online or offline data set as long as they can generate categorised results for a search… Lenses are various ways to present the data that come from Scopes.

    Yes the future lies in data mining but as you point out, the success depends on there being a high degree of compatibility between the data structure and the mining technique.Interesting that you identify both on and off line sources; with off being or at least interpreted as local, for this actually starts to raise some very interesting possibilities.

    Sure you can, as you suggest, use a filtering options such as ratings and categories but you will still need a very good relationship between the category structure (hierarchy) and the nomenclature of the databases and the mining tool respectively.

    One option is to to develop non-hierarchal databases (i.e Cassandra) but not only is this extremely complex it generates a very high number of redundant structures (i.e mirrors,duplicates or pathways that no one uses!). So if your not careful you soon find the sophistication exceeds both comprehension and the specification for practical operation: you end up with just chaos!

    Interesting goal option “creating a device-like experience that was search driven”; you seek the path but not the destination? In my experience its the destination that usually leads us to The Path ; but that’s mystics for you: always doing things backward. Actually its difficult to interpret what you mean by this statement.

    You bet? I bet too that this will be fertile ground for innovation and whilst it may well be pretty straightforward to make a scope, making a good one is another story and perhaps in here lies the Holy Grail of “search-sort-compute” the application of applications… the single interface that all subscribe too and underneath it a data mining and structuring tool that displays information in a way that fits and is tailored to the application (use)..
    take it a step further and it also becomes a data gathering and sharing tool; don’t take that as a sinister aspect it is not but the process of gathering, arranging and displaying data can generate additional data which can be beneficial to the original database…

    one more step and it’s self referential and thats gonna be an event analogous with Schrödinger’s cat jumping out the box tooting a nuclear ray gun and wearing a T-shirt saying “that’s quantum probability 4U!” I will take your advice and check out Luke though, could be useful to me, you never know…

    “Growing community and ecosystem” Nice choice of words Mark, now you’re speaking my language.. and whilst I would agree that a project like this needs diverse perspectives, talents and interests to make it feel rounded and complete, I don’t agree with your assumption that Canonical is carrying the core load. From what I can see you and Canonical are just holding the baton at the moment… someone had it before and someone will have it after you… this is open source, it belongs to no-one and no one claims more credit than another. Someone might only contribute five lines of code in a billion bu its the five lines that support the whole system… it might have taken 30 seconds to write but its essentialness outweighs anything that is built upon it.. no matter how pretty the panel or the graphics are for the visual experience of the stakeholder.. Similarly Mark one should remember that money has more in common with toilet paper than not. The same is not true for talent (excluding the talent for accumulating money) which is what you and Canonical actually rely on.

    As regards the 3D ideas, this sounds interesting and it will potentially become more so when you begin to develop and integrate this concept with the Scoping and Lensing ideas. I look forward.

    Regards

    Greenman-23

  275. malcolm says: (permalink)
    September 6th, 2011 at 3:47 pm

    further to my last post (which i still awaiting moderation?) in which I mention checking out Luke… Sadly my ignorance and searching cannot find anything on ‘Luke’ unless we are talking Skywalker….

    so Mark could you elaborate on )send/post a link) to:

    It’s pretty straightforward to make a scope, I’m sure others will blog and document the precise mechanisms but for those who want a head start, just use the source, Luke.

    regard

    gm-23

  276. open_ideas says: (permalink)
    September 6th, 2011 at 11:26 pm

    Openbox, avant-window-navigator and xcompmgr
    Will give you desired zing without the overhead.

    specifically,
    xcompmgr -c -t -5 -l -r4.2 -o.55 &

    enjoy

  277. Nick says: (permalink)
    September 7th, 2011 at 8:52 am

    I am a aspiring Ubuntu Fan. Aspiring because I am trying really hard to make the complete switch. I run my own Linode slice and I run a Ubuntu laptop. The only reason that I have not made the full switch is that there are still a few funny little tasks that I need windows for. As crazy as this sounds I use MS Paint to do very rough mock-ups of web pages that I need designed….(stop laughing :). I have tried various Ubuntu option and cannot get the same leave of ease on producing slapped together layouts. But I believe that this type unique user requirement is what prevents most users from making the switch. If you could somehow map typically windows users behaviour and try and identify these unique types of needs, it might make the switch a little easier. Perhaps I am just saying that Ubuntu can also be less about bells and whistles and more about utility. Otherwise I love the progress being made and look forward to more :)

  278. Lance says: (permalink)
    September 7th, 2011 at 5:09 pm

    Dear Mr. Shuttleworth,

    I just wanted to say a big thank you to you and your team for all the years of hard work you have put into giving everyone a genuine alternative.

    Ubuntu continues to rescue me, and the friends to whom I introduce it, from impossible situations. We have been liberated, given back our freedom and having a viable alternative will only become more important with time. For that I must thank you and those who have helped make Ubuntu GNU/Linux what it is today.

    I am saddened that some seem to lose sight of what a wonderful desktop we have inherited (free of charge). I am saddened by the unfair criticism. I would like to encourage you and the team to keep going, keep the faith, if nothing else for the millions of appreciative users out there – the silent majority who applaud these efforts made in their behalf.

    The progress Ubuntu has made in a few short years has been breathtaking. It may go down as the fastest improving desktop operating system in history. We have got this far – we can be confident in the future.

    Thanks again !

    Regards,

    L.

  279. Surprised and Disappointed says: (permalink)
    September 8th, 2011 at 4:19 pm

    Mark, Unity is great and is looking better than ever before. I was really looking forward to this release until something happened that tarnished Ubuntu’s good name for me: I opened the Dash to find in “Suggested Applications,” an app called “PornViewer.” Before I take Ubuntu off all my family’s computers (especially my children’s), I’d like to know whether this was a mistake, or whether Ubuntu has decided to now promote porn to all users by including adult content in the Software Center. Personally, porn is easy enough to access if one wants it, without having to include it in the repos. This was a poor and polarizing decision if your goal is to win users from family-friendly OS’s like Mac and Windows. Looking forward to your reply.

  280. Alexander Wilms says: (permalink)
    September 8th, 2011 at 8:16 pm

    “I am saddened that some seem to lose sight of what a wonderful desktop we have inherited (free of charge). I am saddened by the unfair criticism. I would like to encourage you and the team to keep going, keep the faith, if nothing else for the millions of appreciative users out there – the silent majority who applaud these efforts made in their behalf.”

    Unfair criticism? I think there’s a lot of constructive criticism. Probably because people love Ubuntu, but not every aspect of Unity. I personally want Unity to succeed, but not at the expense of usability and customizability, which currently is the case.

  281. mark says: (permalink)
    September 9th, 2011 at 8:33 am

    Surprised and Disappointed,

    PornViewer is just one of tens of thousands of apps. At the moment, the Dash randomly picks apps to present in the “also available” list, and we know that’s a bug, and we know this is a symptom on the bug. It will get fixed.

  282. Surprised and Disappointed says: (permalink)
    September 9th, 2011 at 1:10 pm

    Hello Mark, and thanks for your reply. My disappointment is not just with the fact that the dash “suggested” it, but that it is included in the Software Center at all. This means my children can search for an app that might also start with “P” to install, and it will display there. Porn is already ubiquitous online, so if one wants to seek it out, it is readily available. Why make an issue of it? Windows doesn’t. I’m a bit surprised, but if that is really your stand, Ubuntu will speedily be removed from my family’s computers, as well as my workplace, and I will no longer be recommending it to friends. What of all the school children using Ubuntu and Edubuntu? No one would leave Ubuntu because adult apps are NOT included. But many would walk away if it is INCLUDED. I really hope you will reconsider. I love Ubuntu, but if you persist in promoting porn to me and my family, it’s a deal breaker.

  283. Surprised and Disappointed says: (permalink)
    September 9th, 2011 at 2:31 pm

    Another thought is that while you mention this is one app among thousands, it’s also a sign that if one adult app has been accepted, more will surely follow, and before long, the software centre will have several. This also affects downstream distro’s, such as Ubuntu Christian Edition, Qimo and Edubuntu. There is no option to exclude adult content on install, nor is there any way to filter out adult content, so whether you intend to or not, this really is pushing adult content on users and minors. If someone wants that kind of thing, they should have to open a browser and go looking for it, as they do on Windows. They shouldn’t stumble across it when looking for children’s games, for example. Thanks for taking the time to listen, and thank-you for making Ubuntu the great operating system that it is.

  284. Mario says: (permalink)
    September 10th, 2011 at 5:37 am

    Thanks Mark for ubuntu and unity. But it would be better to rewrite the code of unity, instead of using the plugin of compiz. You have the best developers and I think that a UI with a theme aereo, as it has kde and windows, and the logo a bit larger in the upper left, would have a better effect. I am convinced that with good will, is compiz off out and adding a better driver from the various manufacturers, will make a good operating system, an alternative to windows and mac. CIAO, dall’Italia

  285. salemboot says: (permalink)
    September 10th, 2011 at 3:32 pm

    Surprised and Disappointed:
    If you are not constantly scrutinizing your families’ computer use then let’s be honest, you aren’t doing your duties as a Parent. I’m sure my children tire of my checking their Internet histories. It’s just my job. We can use the recent kernel.org hack as an example of system administrators not staying on top of things. Almost a month went by and nobody noticed. Sony is another classic example of letting patches slide. If you own a computer then you are the system administrator and no matter how easy Ubuntu makes using the computer there is never an excuse for a lack of supervision.

    You wouldn’t let your 10 year old drive your car to his friends house to play video game therefore you shouldn’t trust children with a unsupervised computer/Internet usage.

    If you work in the technology sector then you endure the constant training, security advisories and search filters.
    We all have a duty and shouldn’t be quick to shift blame. Because nothing is perfect.

  286. Surprised and Disappointed says: (permalink)
    September 10th, 2011 at 5:35 pm

    @salemboot Thanks for your thoughts. I agree that parents should take a more active role in supervising their children’s online activity. That’s why I’ve raised this issue here. By including adult apps in the Software Center, Ubuntu has just moved the problem offline and right inside the operating system. Now my kids don’t even need to open a browser or go online to be confronted with adult content. They just have to use Ubuntu or one of its downstream derivatives, and attempt something as innocent as searching for a children’s game. My job as a parent is to make sure our home’s computers are family-friendly, and I’m hoping Ubuntu will cooperate with parents on that. If not, what is becoming Ubuntu Adult Edition will have to be removed from my home altogether. Contrary to shifting blame, I think I’ve laid it squarely where it belongs in this case, friend.

  287. Mal says: (permalink)
    September 11th, 2011 at 12:40 am

    Surprised and Disappointed says:

    “porn is easy enough to access if one wants it, without having to include it in the repos”.

    “Now my kids don’t even need to open a browser or go online to be confronted with adult content”

    Lies are easy to tell if one wants attention, an you got the attention didn’t you.

    Using “P” as the search term you suggested I found only an app that “could” be used to organise an *existing* collection of images/movies.

    The application you refer to IS NOT porn. The developer could have chosen any number of alternative names ie.. “Picture Organiser”. The app organises a picture/photo/movie collection, it contains NO PORN.

    Yes it is a poor choice of names, that I will not argue. But, let’s be clear Ubuntu is NOT offering porn to adults/children and porn is NOT available in UBUNTU if you or your child is NOT online.

    Of course that will be irrelevant to you. I have no doubt you will “milk” it as much as you can.

    For me and perhaps me alone *you* are more offensive than the app.

    Mal

  288. Surprised and Disappointed says: (permalink)
    September 11th, 2011 at 4:52 pm

    @Mal Then do me a favour. Since you think this is a great decision and support it so much, go get your small children, sit them down in front of your computer, and open the Ubuntu Software Center. Find Pornview, show it to them (they’re going to find it anyway, might as well be there when they do), and let them ask YOU what “porn” is. Do you even have children? I hope not. But if you do, and you really want to have that discussion with your 7 year old, then go ahead, but not this parent. Please don’t be so presumptuous as to assert that I am seeking attention and that I intend to “milk” the issue. You don’t even know me! If regarding the well-being of children and families is offensive to you, that’s your problem, not mine. Anyway, I have raised this issue here, and I’ve yet to hear back from Mark. I’m done discussing it, and I’ve said all I can say, hoping the right call will be made to ensure Ubuntu remains an operating system that everyone can use.

  289. manny says: (permalink)
    September 12th, 2011 at 12:49 pm

    hmm, looks like ubuntu indeed needs a better release model if it wants quality releases instead of just quantity of releases:

    http://netsplit.com/2011/09/08/new-ubuntu-release-process/

  290. What's coming in Ubuntu's new Unity Linux desktop | ZDNet says: (permalink)
    September 13th, 2011 at 4:44 pm

    [...] According to Canonical founder, Mark Shuttleworth the next version of Unity, which is due out in October, “Our goal with Unity is unprecedented ease of use, visual style and performance on the Linux desktop.” [...]

  291. What’s coming in Ubuntu’s new Unity Linux desktop | Install Ubuntu says: (permalink)
    September 14th, 2011 at 12:32 am

    [...] According to Canonical founder, Mark Shuttleworth the next version of Unity, which is due out in October, “Our goal with Unity is unprecedented ease of use, visual style and performance on the Linux desktop.” [...]

  292. francesco44 says: (permalink)
    September 14th, 2011 at 8:38 pm

    Dear Mark,

    Now the affair is clear….Some people loves unity, some people hates it. In any case many power users won’t use it. I do not like windows, i love Linux….But the solution adopted for windows 8 seems clever and natural: it give the possibility to switch between two very different desktop configuration. One for the tablet…and one “classic” Windows.

    It seems evident that Ubuntu will have advantages to follow this model. I do not care if you may switch “on the spot” or at the beginning of a session. Therefore the best way to do that is to configure LXDE as a substitute to Gnome 2…with the Ubuntu Style, fonts….etc.

    As you know Lubuntu is accessible to that customization…but rather than being a separate distro..it is best to integrate it in Ubuntu (as lubuntu Desktop can be installed in Ubuntu.

    This will eventually stop that trolling againt and for Unity at the benefice of every user.

    But for that you should devote some effort within the Canonical team.

    I just hope you read the posts carefully and think about it. If you do that you will be again the “benevolent dictator” everyone used to love…instead of being a new Stalin or Mao (or Sarkosy) of the UI.The power corrupt anybody…do not let your power corrupt you.

    Peace and Love

    All my friendship and wish for a peaceful life in the Open Source …

    And many thanks for Ubuntu…event with UnitY….but with a choice for LXDE (or XFCE)!

  293. A Grab Bag of Resources for Getting to Know the Next Ubuntu | PHP World says: (permalink)
    September 15th, 2011 at 4:24 pm

    [...] can find some good screenshots and details on what’s under the hood in version 11.10, in this post from Shuttleworth. Check out the screenshot of Dash! Also, on the applications front, look into this post about how [...]

  294. Henry Miller says: (permalink)
    September 15th, 2011 at 10:54 pm

    I imagine most supporters of this Unity shape are in their early twenties.
    With this Unity looks you’ve passed the point where, it is simply far too much from professional design/accessibility.

  295. A Grab Bag of Resources for Getting to Know the Next Ubuntu | Install Ubuntu says: (permalink)
    September 16th, 2011 at 2:07 am

    [...] can find some good screenshots and details on what’s under the hood in version 11.10, in this post from Shuttleworth. Check out the screenshot of Dash! Also, on the applications front, look into this post about how [...]

  296. 104LTS says: (permalink)
    September 16th, 2011 at 5:17 pm

    Fully agree with the above post (francesco44):

    For some people and devices Unity seems to be the right thing. However I belong to the ones who really do not find this appropriate for their working style and equipment. I use a large 1080p monitor and often handle larger numbers of applications, virtual machines, etc. simultaneously. IMO the “mobile device look and feel” is not helpful in this context.

    I am fine with the approach as long as Unity is one option and there still is a more traditional variant available.

    If Unity should turn out to be the only alternative, I guess I will continue to use my 10.04 LTS main installation for a few more months and then start out looking for an alternative distribution that gives me a more traditional “workstation experience”. Would be sad, though, as I have been very fond of Ubuntu until now.

  297. 104LTS says: (permalink)
    September 16th, 2011 at 5:35 pm

    Sorry. Re-reading my comment above I have to modify it substantially: I do surely NOT agree with the comment made by (francesco44) regarding the whole “dictator” discussion. This is nonsense IMO. Everybody is free to make ones own choices and nobody is dictating anything in this context. What I do agree with is that Unity might not be for everyone and that the free software community might be better of if this whole discussion does not become a dividing point. I think all the emotion comes because Ubuntu is a great system and, being passionate, people tend to be frustrated if things develop in a different direction than they personally had imagined. Sorry again for the inaccuracy in my first post.

  298. Unity 4.14. 2 | Bleki Dási says: (permalink)
    September 17th, 2011 at 8:02 am

    [...] grafikaként jelennek meg, ahogy azt korábban Mark Shuttleworth blogjában lévő mockupon is láthattuk. Ha az egeret nyitott Dashnál az indítópanelre húzzuk, az ikonok visszanyerik a [...]

  299. manny says: (permalink)
    September 17th, 2011 at 9:44 pm

    @francesco44,

    you can install lubuntu right from the ubuntu desktop.

    look for the “lubuntu-desktop” package in the software center.

    then once installed, log out and choose lubuntu (or which ever you installed). Is very easy.

    As for ubuntu, once they implement solutions to the problems that are holding it back, is going to become a great consumer OS.

  300. Últimos ajustes para o lançamento do novo Ubuntu! | Blog Seja Livre says: (permalink)
    September 25th, 2011 at 8:36 am

    [...] muitas das mudanças que os usuários estão esperando agora estão se tornando aparentes. Em um post recente,  Mark Shuttleworth presidente da Canonical, descreve algumas dessas [...]

  301. What’s coming in Ubuntu’s new Unity Linux desktop | LINUX REVIEW says: (permalink)
    September 25th, 2011 at 12:01 pm

    [...] According to Canonical founder, Mark Shuttleworth a subsequent chronicle of Unity, that is due out in October, “Our thought with Unity is rare palliate of use, visible character and opening on a Linux desktop.” [...]

  302. kikl says: (permalink)
    September 29th, 2011 at 11:28 am

    Dear Mark,

    I’ve been using 11.10 for quite a while and would like to share my impressions:

    1. The software centre looks spectacular. I haven’t tried syncing the apps across computers, but if it works as advertised, great!

    2. The dash: Huge improvement. You can really tell that user testing has been performed. Small changes such as integrating the ubuntu button into the launcher, maximizing and closing in the upper left corner like in any other window… The looks are great, love the transparency, the launcher becomes colourful, the panel icons change contrast, lots of polish. The filters and lenses (?) add usability. Great, great work!

    3. The global menu: I got used to it quite fast with maximized windows. Hiding the menu cleans up the GUI and lets you concentrate on work. It looks great once you know it’s there. I don’t know whether users are easily going to discover the feature. A short film or introduction during installation could help a lot. However, this is my first major complaint: Global menu with non-maximized windows is a usability nightmare!? Test it, test it, test it, you must get rid of it. I am sure the usability tests are going be unambiguous. Sorry, but copying bad apple features won’t get you anywhere. I imagine that it’s something you personally love, but think of the users (and business) first. So keep it for maximized windows and get rid of it for non-maximized windows. The menu (hidden or not) as well as the close/maximize/minimize icons must be connected to the non-maximized window the good old way.

    4. Stop/system settings. You have combined the Turn-off button with the system settings. Either you integrate a separate system settings icon into the top panel or you integrate the system settings into the dash. But the current solution doesn’t make any sense. I think a slick settings lens in the dash would be the right solution. The system settings are basically programs/applications. Therefore, the dash is the place to look for them. A notification area for attached devices could be part of the top panel. I do like the new “online accounts” menu in the system settings. So far it only works for google, but it’s a neat idea.

    O.K. I am an experienced user, so this is the feedback of a geek. I am going to test the 11.10 on my old mom, who is still using XP. I am going to set it up specifically for her needs and test how she copes with the changes.

    Wish you all the best

    Kikl

  303. Jason says: (permalink)
    September 30th, 2011 at 3:59 am

    Mr. Shuttleworth, can you please give users the option of using the “flat darkening” Dash? After using Oneiric Beta-1 and Beta-2, I am really not liking this new “colored” Dash. A setting that let’s users choose which they want to use would make everyone happy.

    My “preferred palette” is that the dash be dark/black. It provides a nice backdrop to display the icons and it helps me focus on whatever task I enabled the dash for. The new “Wash” effect has removed most everything I love about the Dash’s appearance. The Dash looks great in Natty and Unity-2D. But I’m really disappointed with the Dash in Oneiric’s Unity-3D :(

    Just because I select a wallpaper with certain colors doesn’t mean I want everything to be that color. Besides, often I’ve got a maximized window open of an application that has some totally different color. Like if I have Gedit open or a webpage, then the background color is mostly white. Opening the Dash with this background results in awful icon-contrast and results in a Dash that has zero visual appeal. One of my favorite things about the Unity interface was Natty’s Dash. I feel like this has totally been undone with Oneiric because of this Wash effect.

    I am really, really hoping (begging) that you will give Oneiric users a setting that will let us use the “flat darkening” background from Natty (or Unity-2D) in Oneiric’s 3D Dash.

  304. Colin says: (permalink)
    September 30th, 2011 at 8:53 am

    I’ve used Ubuntu since it started. I’ve stuck with it and been impressed with the fantastic achievements.

    I just did a new install… I’m sorry to say it, but Unity is confusing, slow and coloured like a child’s toy.

    The classic Gnome interface has been very effective for me, logical, simple, word based. All the gee-wizz flashy Unity colours make it look like a kiddy interface to me.

    I don’t think it’s a step forwards. If you must go down the gaudy colour path, please keep a simple clean Gnome-classic version for business users.

    Cheers, Colin

  305. Emiliano Puddu says: (permalink)
    September 30th, 2011 at 10:54 am

    Dear Mark, I’m trying Unity and I will use it because I believe in innovation and I like you idea of Linux (and 200 000 000 people that will use it).
    I’m thinking about one thing: to use Unity at its best, I would remove the horizontal bar (heavy) and use only the side bar, but with menù icons inside. In place of icons of libreoffice, one, and so on, I placed there icons of Accessories, Multimedia, System, Office, Configuration…once you click on them, the usual dash opens in the corresponding environment, showing icons of Word, Draw, Calc, Impress, for example…
    An additive icon showing the shutdown commands, connection status, chat, mail etc etc should be added.
    I have thought this because I think that the killapp of Unity is its emptyness, its lightness with respect to kde, gnome3 etc…but the horizontal bar in not perfectly style integrated to the side bar, which brings the real innovation…
    I hope I gave some interesting concepts.
    Best Regards,
    Emiliano

  306. sibin says: (permalink)
    October 8th, 2011 at 2:37 pm

    I hate Ubuntu 11.10 ,It is very slow on my computer.So i uninstall and install Ubuntu 10.10.Now everything is fine..Please tell more about Lubuntu and Xbuntu .Which is faster in my 6 year old ,Celeron based PC having 1GB RAM,200 GB HDD with no Graphics card …Please replay me………

  307. Ubuntu 11.10 for Productive People says: (permalink)
    October 9th, 2011 at 10:26 am

    [...] reading Mark Shuttleworth’s blog, I’ve found strong feelings out there on Ubuntu’s default user interface. I agree with [...]

  308. Peter Risdon says: (permalink)
    October 16th, 2011 at 11:12 am

    I’m afraid this is where you lose me as a user. I want my computer back. For ease of use, I’ll stick with my Mac. For development, some other Linux or maybe FreeBSD again.

    Bye.

  309. Andy says: (permalink)
    October 16th, 2011 at 8:01 pm

    Mark: Why would you use a scrollbar at all with a touch interface? I’ve never used a scrollbar on my Android phone…

  310. mark says: (permalink)
    October 16th, 2011 at 8:58 pm

    @Andy

    You wouldn’t use a scrollbar on a touch interface, that’s the point ;-)

    Mark

  311. Roger says: (permalink)
    October 17th, 2011 at 1:57 pm

    The temptation is to leap straight to criticism, but that would be unfair, because Ubuntu is not exactly alone in making changes that I dislike (Windows is going the same way), and I do appreciate many of the advances in Ubuntu that have made using a Linux desktop more viable.

    So, I would like to say first that I applaud the fact that Ubuntu has provided a version of GNU/Linux that, for the most part, works out of the box. Automatic detection and support of hardware was always a weakness in Linux that you have gone a long way towards solving. Similarly, I have generally positive views on the changes made to the startup and shutdown procedures. For the past several releases, Ubuntu has performed so much better than Windows on identical hardware ( where it used to be comparable, or even slightly slower ) that it is hard to believe.

    So, in general, I like Ubuntu, and I use it to the exclusion of other Linux distributions.

    But having said that, I have to admit that I am no fan of the current trends in the computer interface world. The two main drivers currently seem to be “search” based interfaces and “touch” based interfaces for small devices. Unity design seems to embody both of these trends, but at the expense of usability for normal window-centric devices.

    I am currently writing this using a device with a keyboard, a mouse equivalent and a screen with a resolution of 1900×1280. The unity interface is frankly abysmal on such a device. Leaving aside how the launcher works, there are several basic problems:

    1. Interface elements are tiny: Window borders are practically non-existent ( so they are difficult to use ), scrollbars tend to disappear whilst trying to use them unless the mouse movement is very accurate.

    2. The base themes lack contrast and interest. UI elements lack much in the way of visual cues and feedback ( space saving mania again ). As a side note, it would be better that all elements of the interface match. The visuals of the 3D Unity dash are at odds with everything else.

    3. Detaching the menu system from the application is plain nonsense. Just because Apple did it does NOT make it a good idea. If you want/need to save space in the application, have the menu as a drop-down from a button on the title bar. You can still merge the title bar with the bar across the top of the screen when you maximize , and it avoids having to go back and forth across the screen when a window is not maximized.

    4. Floating hints ( Tool-tips ) and pop-up menus exist for some elements and not others; help features do not seem to exist directly in any Unity element, and customization appears to be close to zero ( aside from the ability to drop links into the launcher ). This means that it is hard for a user to do anything to improve usability.

    5. Most of the Windows opened appear jammed into the top left of the screen, often with the launcher bar on top of it. This is not necessarily useful.

    Now, I understand that many of these criticisms would not apply if I were using unity on a 10″ touch screen with 1024×768 resolution. But I’m not. I have 5 devices that run Ubuntu, and none of them look like that. Conversely, I have one tablet device that does look like that, and it does not run Ubuntu, because there is no value in putting Ubuntu on it. It gets used for casual browsing, as its form factor and capabilities makes it useful for little else.

    I was going to now turn to the launcher and criticize its sudden loss of speed in 11.10: Initially I found that the the Dash Home took about 4 seconds to open after being clicked, and that logging out of the Unity shell seemed to hang for 10-15 seconds. Fortunately, this seems to be due to the 3D graphics driver used. After replacing the default open source driver with the ATI provided driver, everything works as snappily as I expected. Under the OSS driver the dash also looks different, maybe it was failing and falling back to 2D?

    The dash itself is visually attractive and functionally cool. Whilst it is aiming towards search-oriented launch, it is less so than the mess in Windows 7. I can see that for most of the time, the Dash COULD provide what I would consider a good experience.

    COULD but DOESN’T because, again, I can’t change anything about the presentation. Personally, I would find it most useful for the dash to present the “More/All Apps” screen ( with the filters twisty open ) directly, as I see no value at all to the dash home screen. Selecting a filter category is then akin to a selecting a sub-menu of apps in a given category, which is more familiar and useful. Searching for apps using text matching is only really useful when installing new ones, since you are unlikely to have that many in any given category actually installed.

    Speaking of which, I would also find it more useful to have “frequently used” and “installable” as collapsed categories, or better yet, a radio button ( as part of the filter? ) that allows selection of favorite / installed / available. If something is a favorite, you already know that, and have probably put it in the launch bar already, so it just wastes space and makes the interface look messy and confusing. Similarly, you are usually starting an infrequently used app, or looking for a new one, but not both. Putting everything in one window just isn’t helpful.

    When looking for documents or data, on the other hand, text matching could be much more useful given that there are potentially far more documents than applications. Categorization may well be insufficient.

    It may sound like that is all very negative, but it is not really. I do not have any issue with trying to introduce improvements or variants, but I doubt the wisdom of removing support for other proven options whilst the new code is still in such a raw state. Quite apart from usability issues and the lack of automatic / manual configuration, there are still significant functional bugs – for example, the categories have just disappeared from all my application selection screens, and the “search music collection” screen returns a meaningless selection when a category is selected but there is no search text.

    Regards,

    Roger.

  312. Rob says: (permalink)
    October 17th, 2011 at 8:27 pm

    There are some good aspects to Unity, such as the lenses in dash, but overall it is inferior to Gnome 3 shell, in my opinion, and I’d rather see the devs work on other issues and just go with Gnome.

    One thing with Unity is the launcher on the desktop, which seems to me to be at odds with the overall design philosophy that Unity is heading toward. Why have the launcher there at all? You can hide it, of course, but then to get into dash you have to move the mouse to the edge of the screen to get the launcher to appear, and then click on the icon to go into dash. It is a pointless couple of steps when you could just mouse into the upper left like in Gnome 3 and dash open with that simple gesture. That’s one change I would certainly recommend to make Unity more attractive. Even though it is a minor feature in the grand scheme of things, it is a one reason I don’t use Unity. It just lacks some of the simple elegance of Gnome 3 shell.

    The icons in dash are overly large and ugly. Granted this is the case in Gnome 3 shell as well (though not quite as bad), and I had to edit a .css file to get the icons down to what looked like a professional desktop and not a cartoon one. I assume it can be changed in Unity as well, but you might consider making it more attractive by default.

    Those are just aesthetic issues, but I think the presence of the launcher and the extra step to get to dash are important. The feel of how it works in Unity is just clunky. If Unity were changed to eliminate the launcher from the desktop entirely (or to at least allow it be eliminated, not just hidden), and a option to open dash by simply mousing to the corner of the screen, I’d at least give Unity another look. Right now, Gnome has the more elegant solution.

  313. arunmanoj says: (permalink)
    October 18th, 2011 at 9:48 am

    First of all the 11.10 release is g8! congrats & thanx 4 that! but 1 prob i am facing with the ubuntu 4 the past 1-1.5yr(s) is still there…The HIBERNATION is still not working in my laptop(dell vostro 3300)…this is very basic thing & ubuntu should/must solve this problem ASAP,(windows vista & 7)’s hibernation works fine without a hitch…

  314. Kikl says: (permalink)
    October 18th, 2011 at 2:31 pm

    “Why have the launcher there at all?” Because it is supposed to provide a very quick access to your favorite applications as well as opened apps. Searching for them in the dash each and every time would be time consuming.

    The dash combines google like search and searching through categories and filters in a single and simple interface. I hope that third party developers are going to be able to provide individual lenses according to people’s preferences. But I feel there is one problem. You have to cover a lot of screen space with your mouse in order to accomplish you goal. Let me illustrate this.

    You start in the top left corner in order to open the dash. Then you wander down to the bottom in order to select the appropriate lens. Thereafter you move all the way to the right hand side in order to select a filter and finally you move back into the center of the screen in order to select the search result. Wow, after this odyssee across your wide and large screen you feel a little exhausted.

    Therefore, I think the buttons should be arranged differently. My suggestion:

    X-0 … Lens Lens Lens Lens
    Dash Filter (debending on selected lens) Search field (for typing)
    Dash Filter Results Results Results..

    If the lenses are in the top left corner, where the menu bar usually is, then the path to them is much shorter and users are accustomed to the position – the lenses provide additional functionality like a menu bar in an application. But keep the ikons, it’s much better than having text fields. Filters could be positioned right below the lens field. So then you just move down to the filter or start typing in the text field. If you don’t want to use the lenses at all, you can just start typing immediately – basically you don’t have to use the mouse at all. So in terms of mouse usage, this would be no drawback. This suggestion has one drawback, you have to drag an application across the filters to the dash in order to position it there. Alternatively, you open the app and then select it with your right mouse button in the dash. But hey, let’s see if someone has a better idea;-)

    Regards

    Kikl

  315. Mike514 says: (permalink)
    October 19th, 2011 at 8:10 pm

    I keep hearing how Unity supposed to be fast, but it’s a slow design. I used to be able to open a second browser in another workspace by clicking on the workspace icon at the bottom of the screen to switch to it, then clicking the browser button at the top of the screen – two clicks and I’m done. NOW I have to click on the workspace switcher button on the Launcher. Right click on the workspace where I want to open the new browser. Click on the Dash button because the browser button won’t open a second browser regardless of where you want it (took me 3 days to figure that one out). Click on Internet Apps. Click on the browser button. FIVE clicks. This is supposed to be faster?

    Unity reminds me of the old joke about Helen Keller’s parents punishing her by rearranging the furniture. Yes the old stuff is all there, but it’s in different places, and only the Unity team knows where and how to navigate it.

  316. mark says: (permalink)
    October 20th, 2011 at 12:37 am

    @Mike514

    The specific issue you have is a bug in Unity that will be fixed in 12.04. Apps that support launching multiple windows will do so by default if you click on them in the launcher in a workspace which does not have that app running in it. So you’ll be back to: select workspace, select app.

  317. Kikl says: (permalink)
    October 23rd, 2011 at 11:46 am

    Two more remarks about the dash if I may. The scroll bar in the dash is very difficult to use. Please add the work that you’ve been doing with scroll bars to the dash.

    Then I asked myself why people are so attached to the old gnome 2.x drop down bar. So I installed one for fun in the top panel in order to use it side by side with the dash. The main advantage of the old design is speed. You just mouse over a category and the results immediately pop up. In the dash a whole lot of clicking is going on. You click the lens, then you click filter results, then you click each and every filter. On top of that it’s just not as responsive. The dash offers many more options than the drop down menu, but it doesn’t offer its speed. Once you’ve addressed this issue the unity haters are going to repent;-)

    Unity (launcher, dash, top panel + global menubar) looks modern and slick. Nautilus now looks great too. Once you’ve polished the dash a little bit more, I think Ubuntu should start giving a little more love to the default applications and their integration. Thunderbird and Firefox are great. The lo-menubar for libreoffice. Gwibber and empathy need some love.

    Wish you all the best

    Regards

    Kikl

  318. fd says: (permalink)
    November 2nd, 2011 at 12:51 pm

    Unity would be easier if each program had it’s own tab in the taskbar. Please please please please pleeeeeease implement this. Keep everything and have every program clickable in the taskbar.