Archive for November, 2011

Month of mo, 1 day to go, unless…

Wednesday, November 30th, 2011

This mo might gro!

Major metrosexual disaster mo

Even the sheep are running scared.

It’s the last day of Movember.

Inspired by your comments, and frankly, more inspired by your donations to Movember in the name of this metrosexual disaster, I’ll take on the challenge of wearing this mating handicap for an extra week for every additional USD 1,000 donated today. About USD 2,100 raised so far, and I’ll match the total when the event wraps up.

Go on, make me do it, at  mobro.co/smonaut.

Update

Your generosity was incredible – thank you everybody. All that hard currency meant I had to wear the mo for an extra week (Claire was a little worried that you’d have her looking around for somebody else to kiss at New Years eve!) and the folks at ZA.Movember seem delighted. I matched all donations made by the end of the month, and will match one other challenge that came in shortly after. Would never have thought to top the charts; kudos is all yours.

Ubuntu TV discussions hot up

Sunday, November 27th, 2011
Good to see the level of interest in a TV experience for Unity. From a weekly update Friday:

Earlier this week the guys in #ubuntu-tv (on Freenode) generated an Etherpad with their thoughts and then arranged a meeting to discuss priorities.  Alan Bell produced some designs:  http://people.ubuntu.com/~alanbell/unitytelly/

The mailing list has seen some decent traffic as well, with people talking mostly about what the future of the Connected TV might be and features they’d like to see.

Thanks guys. The resulting list looks like this:
Essential
- 10′ interface- Watching Media (DVR, Live, Network(TV Guide is part of DVR/other services))- Control via remote controlHigh priority- Plugin support- Cloud and/or server storage (for home grown media)

- Playback of physical media (USB cd/dvd/bluray drive)

- Installable image

- Easy configuration of new devices (eg. installing same plugins, mounting same network shares)

- Ubuntu One Accounts

- Push media to/from other Ubuntu devices / Media syncing capabilities (Pause on one device, resume from same spot on another device)

- Collaborate with other Ubuntu devices (context: https://lists.launchpad.net/ubuntu-phone/msg00006.html )

- Control from portable devices (phones/tablets/web interface/PC) (collaboration with Ubuntu Phone/Tablet?)

Medium priority

- Sharing media with friends (social network connectivity)

- Purchasing media through online stores (Ubuntu one/Amazon/Netflix)

 

Not a bad list at all. Thanks to tgm4883, MrChrisDruif, imnichol, callumsaunders1, dmj726 and others.

Separately, reports from a team that may have a crack at implementing the TV interface:

… tracked down some bugs in QML itself, fixed them, and are submitting patches upstream.  Next time you read that Qt Mobility now supports hardware accelerated video playback, or how the “ShaderEffectItem” now respects the “clip” property, or simply that the OpenGL video painter renders where it’s supposed to; you know who to thank.  As an added bonus this will benefit Unity-2D.  Awesome work.

Appreciation for Daniel Holbach

Sunday, November 20th, 2011

Today, since it’s impossible to thank everyone individually who helps make Ubuntu such a wonderful project, I want to express public appreciation for Daniel Holbach’s amazing contribution to our community.

A smooth-running community is not a miracle, it’s the result of dedication, energy, organisation and empathy. Daniel has all of those gifts and qualities in abundance, and the impact he’s had on the governance of Ubuntu is profound.

We pride ourselves on being a meritocracy and a do-ocracy. Those who have the capacity and the will and the commitment and the values and the energy to lead, and who are recognised as leaders by their peers in the project, get the opportunity to take on responsibilities in one of the many parts of the project, or overall in the CC or TB. But it takes insight and effort to recognise those with that potential, and it takes leadership to encourage them to step forward to shine, and it takes organisation to coordinate diverse efforts so as to ensure a harmonious result. For all of the work and play he brings to that, I thank him.

In a galaxy of many stars, it’s perhaps impolite to single out one in particular. So please counterbalance that impertinence by picking your own star to thank; in our community, the depth and strength don’t come from the headline acts so much as the diversity of contributions from an enormous number of people. Thank you all.

Caption competition

Wednesday, November 16th, 2011

I’ve donated my face to charity. It’s not a tattoo, but it’s nevertheless a commitment. Really.

118 118?

"It will only take me a minute to fetch the lube."

You can contribute to the cause (male health, grin and bare it etc) via the excellent Movember and if you do it as a result of my embarrassment then I’ll match it up to a somewhat unreasonable figure. I think they take plastic, and for the globally challenged $1 is about R8, so your donation will look much more impressive than it is. Just like my tache. Think big ;-)

If however you would like to substitute wit for cash, and this is a rare occasion when that is a possibility, add your caption for this 70′s throwback to the comments below.

Community growth and development

Friday, November 4th, 2011

Martin’s chart showing the pattern of growth in Ubuntu project membership supports a view of deepening and strengthening participation in Ubuntu, globally. A second data point for me is the number and caliber of nominations we’ve seen to community governance boards, not just at the most senior levels (community council and technical board) but also in the breadth of community activities.

In the past year we’ve had to refine our thinking about a number of issues. The question about whether contributions outside the project, with a specific emphasis on Ubuntu, should be considered on a par with contributions directly to the project was resolved inclusively. So we are delighted to welcome members who do work in Debian to ensure that Ubuntu and Debian stay on rails together, and we are delighted to welcome members who contribute to projects elsewhere with the aim of improving the experience for Ubuntu users.

It remains true that there is no aspect of Ubuntu that a community participant cannot influence. At UDS this week it was impossible to tell, across hundreds of sessions, which voices were from Canonical, or Dell, or ARM, or Linaro, or from folk who have no corporate affiliation but have a passion for getting things done, and getting them in front of millions of users, and getting them right. From the artwork we ship, to the way we evaluate contributions, and the versions of software we include by default, to the toolchain and kernel and infrastructure that makes it happen, the degree of diverse participation is something we can be proud of. So thank you to everyone, whether participating for personal or corporate interests, for your engagement with Ubuntu.

It was a pleasure to meet the (mostly) new Community Council, and to have a session in person. And it was wonderful to see the vibrancy of the Community Leadership Track at UDS, and the participation in those discussions by leaders of other communities like GNOME and Debian. We have a lot to learn, and a lot to teach.

As a community, we will flourish if two things remain true:

  • We continue to attract and empower motivated and energetic participants
  • We defend our core values and the tone of our discussions
Given that our mission is profound and meaningful, I have no concerns on the former front. Brilliant and energetic people continue to join the project. It’s up to us to clear the way for them to do what they do best, whether it’s translation, motivation, leadership, organisation, software development, quality assurance, art, or cooking for a loco event.
More challenging is the need to recognise that the success of Ubuntu will attract voices that are more interested in influence than participation; now that Ubuntu is a conduit to millions of users, it is an effective way to broadcast to all of them. When we started, the only people who showed up were those attracted to our values and our mission, now we will attract folk who are interested in our users. That’s why we should weigh the voices of those who have actually contributed much more heavily than those who seek to influence the project without doing any work. And it’s why we need to make sure that the tone of conversation stays true to the Ubuntu code of conduct, and the goals of the project – to serve the needs of others rather than ourselves – maintain primacy.
Growth brings challenges; it is no longer possible to show up and immediately define the rules, we are a large and complex and fast-moving institution. We will see many contributors come, and thrive, and move on. We will celebrate their successes and their highs, but also share their sadnesses and lows. We were all saddened to hear of the death of Andre Godim, a champion of Ubuntu and free software in Brazil, this week. We are a real and complex and human society.
In a big and established community like ours, it takes some patience to figure out how to get things done, how to exert influence, how to create change. It takes the sort of discipline and effort that separates doers from talkers, the constructive from the merely present, the energetic from the lethargic. And that’s a good thing: in order to make a big change, we need depth and quality as an institution. This is no longer a chaotic revolution, it is about balanced governance and effective, constructive change.
We all owe a debt of gratitude to Jono and his horsemen for the way they lead Canonical’s thinking on our relationship with Ubuntu and other participants in the project. It takes a huge amount of work, first and foremost, to bring together a community of such intensity, diversity and depth. And we similarly owe a debt of gratitude to those who take tough decisions; it’s their willingness to make commitments on behalf of parts of the project, and your willingness to stand by those commitments, that makes Ubuntu wonderful and impactful.